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Sunday, 17 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 17/09/2014 - 12:14am
Story ACPI, kernels and contracts with firmware Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 11:11pm
Story Canonical Partners with AMD for Ubuntu OpenStack Cloud Server Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 9:13pm
Story Docker Raises $40M in Series C Financing to Drive Open Source Adoption Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:44pm
Story Open Source Fix For US Voting System ? Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:40pm
Story Expanding Reach in Asia: Telenor Group Brings Firefox OS Smartphones to Bangladesh Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:36pm
Story Android One phones launch in India Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:30pm
Story Valve Begins Publicly Tracking AMD Catalyst Linux Issues Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:19pm
Story Flowhub Kickstarter delivery Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:14pm
Story Windows vs Linux: Which OS is best for your business? Rianne Schestowitz 16/09/2014 - 8:11pm

Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

Filed under
Linux
  • Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

  • LinuxWorld 2008 features cloud, virtualization topics
  • Installfest at LinuxWorld could seed national program
  • LinuxWorld Expo Preview: Four Canonical and Ubuntu Linux Trends
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

A Quick Look at OpenOffice.org Writer 3.0 Beta 2

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta 2 is available in preparation for an official September release. Here are some quick first impressions of the Writer word-processor program.

KDE 4.1 Beta 2 on OpenSuSE 11.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

gordonazmo.wordpress: Decided to give OpenSuSE 11.0 a spin - wasn’t terribly amazed by the 10.3 release, but really curious to see what they did with KDE 4.x. Long story short, they did quite a nice job polishing it to look familiar to KDE 3.5.x users. Too ‘familiar’ and not enough 4.x’ish for my liking, but kudos to them - almost everything worked like you would expect it to work. Played around with it for like an hour, then decided to give KDE 4.1 Beta 2 a spin.

Will a $19.99 Ubuntu Succeed Where the Free Version Hasn’t?

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Canonical, the company behind the Linux distro Ubuntu, has collaborated with software distributor ValuSoft to sell a boxed version of Ubuntu 8.04 into Best Buy retail stores. Is $19.99 a better price point for Ubuntu than $0?

KDE 4.1: Good enough for ME

Filed under
KDE

jucato.org/blog: KDE 4.1 is coming! If all goes according to schedule, we should see it released in a day or so. I’ve migrated my main user to KDE 4 totally, except for a few KDE 3 apps here and there. I just want to share some of the things I’m loving in KDE 4 in general, and KDE 4.1 in particular. With screenshots, of course!

Economic clustering and Free Software release coordination

Mark Shuttleworth: I had the opportunity to present at the Linux Symposium on Friday, and talked further about my hope that we can improve the coordination and cadence of the entire free software stack. I tried to present both the obvious benefits and the controversies the idea has thrown up.

5 simple reasons to choose Linux over Vista

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: Linux enthusiasts have always touted for Linux to be one of the best operating systems ever. Their voice grew shriller with the advent of Microsoft Windows Vista in the market.

PCLinuxOS: Definitely “Radically Simple”

Filed under
PCLOS

blogs.techrepublic.com: The slogan for PCLinuxOS is “Radically Simple” and, as far as I can tell, it might be one of the most fitting operating system slogans I have seen. But does it apply across the board? From start to finish? I decided it had been too long since I had tried this distribution so I went about giving it a go. I have to say I was certainly impressed.

Sun dropping out of OOo wouldn't be bad

Filed under
Interviews
OOo
SUSE

derstandard.at: Novell-developer Michael Meeks finds strong words for Sun's management of the free office suite in an interview - Pushes for own OOo flavor and talks about KDE/GNOME-unification

World's cheapest laptop' now available

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxworld.com (IDG): A company is now selling what it calls the "world's cheapest laptop," which at $130, is not a bad deal if you can bear some hardware limitations.

A Non-insider's Guide to Free and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

sharplinux.blogspot: For years I have been using and, in some cases, promoting "open source" software, but until a few months ago, I really couldn't have told you what is really behind that idea. I knew vaguely, but since neither I nor anyone I know actually would delve into the source code (at least not at this point), what does it matter?

Microsoft Joins the ASF: Can They Be Trusted?

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

ostatic.com: Microsoft announced on Friday that it would be joining the Apache Software Foundation, which costs $100,000/year and is the highest level of sponsorship that the foundation offers. Bruce Perens, a well-known open-source advocate, cautioned on Slashdot that "there's much reason for caution."

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 263

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Guest Review: NimbleX 2008

  • News: Mandriva's 10th Birthday, Fedora 9 Re-Spins, openSUSE PromoDVD, and Foxconn Crippled BIOS
  • Released last week: NimbleX 2008, Foresight 2.0.4, and DragonFly BSD 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Musix 2008-7, sidux 2008-03, and Draco 0.3.2
  • Mini Review: Parted Magic 3.0
  • Reviewed last week: NimbleX 2008, Vector 5.9 SOHO
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly...

Novell's OpenSUSE Version 11 is definitely stacked--maybe too much

Filed under
SUSE

crn.com: Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9 have made great strides in making desktop Linux more user-friendly and technologically advanced. With OpenSUSE 11, Novell Inc. can match them feature for feature.

Traveling Success with Linux

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I have spent the past four days on a short vacation in the Piedmont area of northwest Italy. This has given me the opportunity to make a "traveling test" of Linux on both of my laptops. During this trip I have tried Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Mandriva.

today's leftovers (part deux)

Filed under
News
  • Cloud Computing Could Invite Data Lock-In

  • Run Linux? Save the World, Please.
  • disabling the annoying system beep in linux
  • Make Your Ubuntu Desktop Rotate As a Cylinder/Sphere
  • Sun releases web stack

Gentoo Monthly Newsletter -- 28 July 2008

Filed under
Gentoo

gentoo.org/news: Welcome to the July issue of the Gentoo monthly newsletter! Since our last issue, Gentoo Linux 2008.0 has been released and the Gentoo Security Team held a meeting on July 14, 2008. In howtos: this guide will show you a method for trying to recover just about any deleted file.

openSUSE at OSCON

Filed under
SUSE

zonker.opensuse.org: I can’t believe OSCON is over already. It seems like the week flew by, probably because there was almost zero downtime from the time I arrived in Portland until the time I went to the airport.

Foxconn, ACPI fail, and leaving money on the table

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Matthew Garrett writes, "Linux hasn't claimed to be Linux in response to OSI queries since 2.6.24." With the current kernel.org Linux pretending to be Windows 2000, XP, Server 2003, or Vista, as a motherboard vendor you could just "not support Linux." What a mess. Why support Linux at all?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Running Quicken Premier 2008 on Linux with Wine

  • How to configure DSL in Fedora Linux
  • Eye Candy in Ubuntu 8.04 - Hardy Heron
  • Our LTSP hackfest effort: KIWI-LTSP 0.4.3 with Live USB and CD support
  • mkinitrd for XFS
  • Google Earth on Gentoo (inspite of Digest error)
  • Open Web Foundation to Play Freedom Cop for Net Specs
  • Videos: Dolphin, Gwenview & More in KDE 4.1
  • Ubuntu on Atom: coming soon to a subnotebook near you
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More in Tux Machines

Tryton and Python Deprecation Warnings

  • Trying Tryton
    The quest to find a free-software replacement for the QuickBooks accounting tool continues. In this episode, your editor does his best to put Tryton through its paces. Running Tryton proved to be a trying experience, though; this would not appear to be the accounting tool we are searching for. Tryton is a Python 3 application distributed under the GPLv3 license. Its home page mentions that it is based on PostgreSQL, but there is support for MySQL and SQLite as well. Tryton, it is said, is "a three-tier high-level general purpose application platform" that is "the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security". The "core base" part of that claim is relevant: Tryton may well be a solid base for the creation of a small-business accounting system, but it is not, out of the box, such a system itself.
  • Who should see Python deprecation warnings?
    As all Python developers discover sooner or later, Python is a rapidly evolving language whose community occasionally makes changes that can break existing programs. The switch to Python 3 is the most prominent example, but minor releases can include significant changes as well. The CPython interpreter can emit warnings for upcoming incompatible changes, giving developers time to prepare their code, but those warnings are suppressed and invisible by default. Work is afoot to make them visible, but doing so is not as straightforward as it might seem. In early November, one sub-thread of a big discussion on preparing for the Python 3.7 release focused on the await and async identifiers. They will become keywords in 3.7, meaning that any code using those names for any other purpose will break. Nick Coghlan observed that Python 3.6 does not warn about the use of those names, calling it "a fairly major oversight/bug". In truth, though, Python 3.6 does emit warnings in that case — but users rarely see them.

Red Hat News

Linux Kernel Space: eBPF and More (LWN Paywall Expired)

  • A thorough introduction to eBPF
    In his linux.conf.au 2017 talk [YouTube] on the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine, Brendan Gregg proclaimed that "super powers have finally come to Linux". Getting eBPF to that point has been a long road of evolution and design. While eBPF was originally used for network packet filtering, it turns out that running user-space code inside a sanity-checking virtual machine is a powerful tool for kernel developers and production engineers. Over time, new eBPF users have appeared to take advantage of its performance and convenience. This article explains how eBPF evolved how it works, and how it is used in the kernel.
  • Restricting automatic kernel-module loading
    The kernel's module mechanism allows the building of a kernel with a wide range of hardware and software support without requiring that all of that code actually be loaded into any given running system. The availability of all of those modules in a typical distributor kernel means that a lot of features are available — but also, potentially, a lot of exploitable bugs. There have been numerous cases where the kernel's automatic module loader has been used to bring buggy code into a running system. An attempt to reduce the kernel's exposure to buggy modules shows how difficult some kinds of hardening work can be.
  • Container IDs for the audit subsystem
    Linux containers are something of an amorphous beast, at least with respect to the kernel. There are lots of facilities that the kernel provides (namespaces, control groups, seccomp, and so on) that can be composed by user-space tools into containers of various shapes and colors; the kernel is blissfully unaware of how user space views that composition. But there is interest in having the kernel be more aware of containers and for it to be able to distinguish what user space considers to be a single container. One particular use case for the kernel managing container identifiers is the audit subsystem, which needs unforgeable IDs for containers that can be associated with audit trails. Back in early October, Richard Guy Briggs posted the second version of his RFC for kernel container IDs that can be used by the audit subsystem. The first version was posted in mid-September, but is not the only proposal out there. David Howells proposed turning containers into full-fledged kernel objects back in May, but seemingly ran aground on objections that the proposal "muddies the waters and makes things more brittle", in the words of namespaces maintainer Eric W. Biederman.

today's howtos