Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Order From Chaos: Choosing A Linux Distribution

Filed under
Linux

bizriver.com: Choosing a Linux distribution from the dozens, if not hundreds, of available options can be a daunting and confusing proposition. What is the best distro? What are the differences between distros? How do I choose? These are all good questions. In this multi-part article, I will give you my opinion and guidelines for choosing.

3 Ways To Linux For The Weak Of Heart

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: Making the switch from Microsoft Windows or Apple’s OS X to Linux can be a daunting proposition for most people. There are a lot of negative myths, half truths and misinformation out there that scare many people off. Fortunately there are several ways to experiment with, and get to know, Linux that will not change your system as it is now.

Ubuntu 8.04 - keep up the good work

Filed under
Ubuntu

arijitsarkar.wordpress: Let me admit that I’m not an Ubuntu fan. This is not because that it’s getting all the limelight in the Linux world and I am a Fedora user. I don’t use it much becuase it’s too user-friendly. Yes, it’s so user-friendly that I’m not getting the fun of using Linux.

And:

  • Ubuntu Linux
  • Ubuntu 8.04
  • My Take on Ubuntu

Linux is ready for your desktop, and your business

Filed under
Linux

pcadvisor.co.uk/blogs: Linux? That's only for geeks, right? Like its forerunner Unix it conjures up visions of terminal windows and cryptic commands.

Qt 4.3.5: Two steps back and one step forward

Filed under
Software

trolltech.com/blogs: Earlier this month, we released the single, largest release of Qt since the 4.0.0 release two years ago. Qt 4.4.0 is the result of 10 months of hard work by the Trolls, including numerous distractions. And while it’s being digested by our clients and users, we’re working on Qt 4.4.1, which will include fixes for bugs that were already known at the time of the 4.4.0 release, as well as some that people have reported.

OOo Basic crash course: Creating a simple application launcher

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: In previous installments of the crash course, you've learned how to build a simple basket tool, a task manager, and even a word game. This time, let's take a look at how you can use the skills you picked up from those exercises to create a simple application launcher, which will allow you to start virtually any application without leaving the convenience of OpenOffice.org.

Linux On The Desktop: Who Cares

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Every so often, you read on Slashdot, Digg, or some other techie news site that Linux is finally ready for the desktop. It's finally to the point that any end user could sit down at a computer and happily compute away. The applications are sufficiently sanitized and Windows-like that even Grandma can use them. I think it's fair to say that most of our previous conceptions of "ready for the desktop" are moot points.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring review

Filed under
MDV

zdnet.co.uk: Linux distros are a bit like buses (bear with me on this) — miss one and another is bound to come along sooner or later. In the case of Mandriva Linux, it's the 2008 Spring edition that benefits from the usual long list of component updates together with full support for the Asus Eee PC, improved synchronisation with mobile devices, PulseAudio sound infrastructure and a handful of other enhancements.

Slackware 12.1 First Impressions

Filed under
Slack

ever-increasing-entropy.blogspot: Late last week I downloaded and installed Slackware 12.1 on my aging (OK, old) Toshiba laptop side by side with Vector Linux Light. My first impression: Slackware is still Slackware.

Is OpenOffice.org getting faster?

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: Some complain OpenOffice.org is slow and bloated. With each release there may be dozens of performance improvements, but there are also new features, some of which may slow things down. This the natural balance in software development, but in the end, what is the net effect on performance from one version to the next?

5 Extensions That I Wish Were Working In Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: One of the feature that makes Firefox a great favorite among users is its huge library of extensions that improved both its functionality and user’s experience. While there are a good number of extensions that are ready for Firefox 3, there are also some of the great add-ons that are not compatible and are sorely missed by many. Here are 5.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux kernel compile secrets. Part 2

  • How To Patch Perl 5
  • Use the OR operator in grep to search for words and phrases
  • Clean up Ubuntu Junk Files
  • Best Method To Reboot Remote Linux / Windows / UNIX Server
  • Controlling desktop applications with six degrees of freedom
  • Ubuntu: Disabling Service on Startup
  • removing outdated ssh fingerprints from known_hosts with sed or … ssh-keygen
  • Fedora 9: Fix No Flash Sound Issue with Firefox 3.0

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Compro Technology responds to GPL accusations

  • Multi-Pointer X Merged To X.Org Master
  • Donnie Berkholz speaks with LinuxCrazy
  • Operation OOXML, Part 7 x 10512: The Appeals Arrive
  • Arora, a WebKit browser in Qt
  • Dependence, entitlement, victimhood
  • Linux Users: no MSDN downloads for you
  • GPL-Violations.org and FTF to work more closely together
  • Wikindx facilitates academic writing in a browser
  • Flock is top browser in PC World’s 100 Best Products
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Achieves Major R500 3D Success
  • What is KDE4 meaning to me (parody)
  • Linux green activists unite

Free software vs. software-as-a-service: Is the GPL too weak for the Web?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: You’ve read the GPL’s preamble, you can name the Four Freedoms, and you do your best to keep proprietary bits off our computers. But what’s the future of free software in the era of Flickr, Google Apps, and Facebook?

Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Linux is already the same piece of shit as Windows. Period. Nothing stable. Nothing that would work in the next version. Bluewhite64 Linux 12.1 "LiveDVD" just screwed my evening. The problem is that the previous Bluewhite64 Linux 12.0 "LiveDVD" just worked, and now the 12.1 LiveDVD is a PITA.

OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3

Filed under
SUSE

lazytechguy.com: OpenSUSE 11 Beta 3 marks the end of Beta series of OpenSUSE 11. With final version scheduled to release in 22 days on 19th June 2008; I felt its time to test what is in-store for us. I was specially interested in the KDE4 version and the new installer.

Nonprofit chooses Ubuntu for servers, OpenOffice for desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Oxford Archaeology, one of the largest independent excavation firms in Britain, has twin missions: discovering and preserving historical artifacts that might otherwise be destroyed by construction projects, and sharing its finds and experiences with visitors to increase their appreciation of archaeology and history.

2.6.26-rc4, "Things Are Calming Down"

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "You know the drill by now: another week, another -rc," began Linux creator, Linus Torvalds, announcing the 2.6.26-rc4 kernel. "There's a lot of small stuff in here", he continued, "most people won't even notice. "

Open source on the wire

Filed under
OSS

idg.no: Once upon a time, using open-source servers and applications for business was frowned upon in many circles. Today, you'd be hard pressed to find any sizeable infrastructure that doesn't leverage open-source code in some form or another.

EeePC 900 running 8.04 OOTB from ZaReason

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

ubuntu-rocks.org/blog: I picked up an Asus EeePC 900 from ZaReason and it arrived today. Now, on the order form it says Xandros but I mentioned in a comment that it would soon be running Ubuntu. Within two minutes of placing the order they replied saying they can put a basic Ubuntu install on it, so I said “heck yeah!”.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more