Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Big Buck Bunny builds a better Blender

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Big Buck Bunny is the colorful product of the Peach open movie project: an animated short released online and on DVD. But in addition to the 'toon itself, Peach has produced an altogether different yield: improvements to the Blender 3-D modeling application.

Audio/Visual Synthesis For Linux: The New Art, Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: The Linux Journal recently published an article I wrote on Jean-Pierre Lemoine's AVSynthesis, a program designed for artists working with the computer as a medium for the synthesis of image and sound. I'm fascinated by that program, so I decided to research the existence of similar software. This article presents the current findings from that research.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Backing up Large Files

  • HowTo: Reset KDE to Previous Configuration State
  • Install SecondLife 1.19.1.4 on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Moving Thunderbird Emails
  • wlan0_rename issue
  • Using SSH as an Ad-Hoc VPN
  • (gtk applications with qt style)
  • Music server via Samba
  • Install a 3D transition effect plug-in for OpenOffice.org

KDE: It’s time for a fork . . . is it really?

Filed under
KDE

cookingwithlinux.com: Over at Practical Tech Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols suggests that it may be time for a fork of KDE, mostly because he doesn't believe that KDE 4.1 is heading in the right direction. All this discussion, and yes, criticism, is also good. Evolution doesn't just move forwards. It moves sideways.

Intrepid Ibex – Catering To The Wrong Users?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lockergnome.com: Ars Technica has an article expounding upon the changes to the next revision of Ubuntu. The tale begins with news that the upcoming release will include support for the sub-notebooks based upon the Intel Atom processor. Very nice, but what portion of the market will be using these things?

Are Linux Users More Productive?

Filed under
Linux

foogazi.com: I’ve been wondering if using Linux actually makes me more productive. I can think of a few reasons why a Linux user may be more productive but I can also counter those reasons with ways running Linux can make you unproductive.

Goodbye, GUI: Thirty Days of Command Line

Filed under
Linux

seanrtilley.blogspot: So, I've decided to do something REALLY out of the ordinary for me. My friend Steven said that I don't understand enough about Linux. Fair enough. To completely immerse myself in tech know-how, I am going to use my computer every day...with nothing but a command line.

Open Source Applications: Catfish

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: Every now and then I bump into a nice, little, relatively unknown but impressive application that makes my life a little bit easier. Catfish is one of those.

What your own open source census can get you

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: As the Open Source Census grinds on (over 250,000 installations so far) it occurs to me just how useful it can be for an enterprise to participate. You might learn something you can profit from.

Why enterprise still cannot accept Linux.

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox.com: Linux is ready for the desktop. It can handle one hundred percent of all business tasks. If you are willing to break the proprietary nipple sucking that is. Yet enterprise still pulls out the same old excuses for not adopting Linux.

Linux’s dirty little secret

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: OK, so over the past few months I’ve grown from being a Linux skeptic into being quite a Linux fan. I’ve still got lots to learn but it’s great having the ability to roll out a no-cost OS onto systems that don’t need to have Windows on them. That said, there are a few aspects of Linux that do annoy/frustrate/anger me/make me hulk out.

The End Of LugRadio

Filed under
Linux

jonobacon.org: Today we announced that we have decided to call it a day with LugRadio. Our last show will be LugRadio Live UK 2008 on the 19th and 20th July 2008 at The Lighthouse in Wolverhampton.

Ubuntu Video Tutorials For People Just Starting Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

cybernetnews.com: Video tutorials are one of the easiest ways to figure out how to do something and for many people making the switch to Linux is one of the hardest things to do. So, why not make a bunch of video tutorials for Linux to make things a little easier?

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 259

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Package management

  • News: openSUSE defends KDE 4, Mandriva cancels alpha release, Debian completes Lenny's security support, Ubuntu unveils MID edition, Zenwalk's J.-P. Guillemin, Acer Aspire One, Linux rescue CDs
  • Released last week: CentOS 5.2, Pardus Linux 2008, Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.04.1
  • New distributions: F-Secure Rescue CD
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Entrepeneurs won't embrace Firefox 3.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

gather.com: Most business entrepreneurs play it safer when dealing with software than in other aspects of their dealings and the launch of Mozilla's Firefox 3.0 has highlighted the issue.

The Russian schools Linux pilot goes nationwide

Filed under
Linux

robertogaloppini.net: The pilot project to migrate schools of three Russian regions to Free Software has recently expanded its geography. Now it is possible for the schools outside of Tatarstan, Perm krai and Tomsk region to voluntarily apply for participation.

New: Ubuntu YouTube Channel

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: The Ubuntu Developer channel has been launched on YouTube. The channel features videos about developing for Ubuntu. Currently, there are several videos featuring the current Ubuntu Developer Summit.

Asustek to launch new Eee PCs with bigger keyboards

Filed under
Hardware

digitimes.com: Asustek Computer is planning to launch new Eee PC models, the 904 and 905, which have an 8.9-inch panel but use a similar chassis and keyboard as the company's 10.2-inch models, according to sources at channel vendors.

Why Is PCLinuxOS 2007 Better Than Ubuntu ?

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

geniushackers.com/blog: I am one of Linux enthusiast like you people, and have used almost all major Linux distros in past.Currently I triple boot Windows XP/Ubuntu Feisty /PCLinuxOS 2007.I am very impressed with PCLOS 2k7, even more than i was with Ubuntu. So i though why not write something which may help other people….

10 Substantial Events in Linux History

Filed under
Linux

adamstechblog.com: Here are a few substantial events in Linux history: 1991 - Linus Torvalds posts his first message about his free operating system resembling MINIX. He mentions that the operating system will probably never support anything other than AT-hard drives.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."