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Saturday, 21 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Benji’s “One-Click-Install” Gets Supported by openSUSE Build Service

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SUSE

news.opensuse.org: The openSUSE Build Service generates .ymp files from now on, which can be used with Benjamin Weber’s One Click Install YaST Module.

Linux Vs. Mac: Which Is The Better Alternative To Microsoft Windows?

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OS

InformationWeek: If you're a Vista-wary Windows user who would rather switch than fight, should you move to a Linux distro or Apple's OS X? We asked a Mac fan and a Linux advocate to lead a guided tour of each OS.

Troubleshooting Linux Audio, Part 2

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HowTos

LinuxJournal: In my last installment of this series I introduced a variety of GUI-based tools that can help you discover more about your system to help identify potentially troublesome components. This week we'll look at some of the command-line utilities that do similar work. In fact, some of these utilities are the engines underneath the more attractive GUI tools, and there may be good reasons to employ the engines directly instead of relying upon their graphic incarnations.

Open to Misinterpretation

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OSS

TuxDeluxe: Before "open source", before free software, there was software in the public domain. You could say that software in the public domain was truly free. The code was "open source" and the user had the right to take it, break it, appropriate it, re-use it, package it, sell it, re-brand and license it, or do what you will with it.

Ubuntu for Dummies ?

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Ubuntu

Techzone: I came across an article Tech writers think Ubuntu is for morons. As this is at Jem Report, I cannot even ignore it. It listed some serious doubts about the capabilities of a Ubuntu user. Here is an attempt to explain/reword the points in the above article.

The pendulum has swung in the open source debate

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OSS

Matt Asay: Once upon a time, the term "open source" was coined to save the free-software world from itself. Or, rather, from the free-software zealots. Today, I can't help but feel that the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction, where we're so self-satisfied with the money we're making off open source that we have neglected the essential freedoms that make open-source profit possible.

Desktop Backgrounds For Minimalist Window Managers Revisited

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HowTos

Caitlyn Martin: Back in February I wrote about using xli to add a desktop background of your choice to a minimalist window manager. It turns out that many distros include something a bit newer and perhaps better than xli. Esetroot can also be used to change the contents of the root window in X.

apt-listbugs: Lists critical bugs before each apt installation

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Software

DPotD: apt-listbugs is a tool designed to warn the user about critical bugs of packages that are about to be installed or upgraded. Once installed, each time you use aptitude or apt-get it will be run, and if it detects any critical bugs will stop to ask the user what to do.

New LyX document processor released, now with unicode!

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Software

arstechnica: The LyX graphical document processor is an open source program that users to focus on content rather than formatting (akin to how HTML is written when your formatting is taken care of in the CSS files).

OpenOffice.org Calc: Pivot tables by another name

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OOo

LinuxJournal: DataPilots are OpenOffice.org Calc's equivalent of what MS Excel and other spreadsheets call pivot tables. Under any name, they are a tool for extracting and summarizing the information contained in spreadsheet cells in a more convenient form. Using a DataPilot, you can immediately see relationships between different pieces of data.

Some KDE news: Decibel 0.5, Plasma Applet Browser and Kicker and Plasma

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KDE

/home/liquidat: Decibel was released as version 0.5. At the same time a Plasma Applet Browser was introduced by Ivan Čukić. Also, it was once again made clear that we will see a kicker replacement for KDE 4.0 in time.

KDE4 is very attractive for software service companies

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KDE

kdedevelopers.org: The next version of KDE4 will run natively on Mac OS X and Windows XP and Vista. This means that it is a very attractive platform for software development. No other cross-platform toolkit looks as good as Qt and has an equally appealing API.

Ubuntu Documentation Mentoring

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Ubuntu

Matthew East: The mentoring project for Ubuntu documentation is going really well - the mailing list has sprung back to life after several slow months and a number of new aspiring contributors with ideas and enthusiasm have come on the scene.

One Month On, GPLv3 Adoption Going Very Smoothly

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OSS

FSM: I recently read the discussion on the GCC development mailing list related to GCC's transition to GPLv3. Despite generating 172 emails, the transition was quite smooth actually.

Linux: Distributed Storage Subsystem

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Linux

kernelTRAP: Evgeniy Polyakov, listed as the ufs filesystem and w1 subsystem maintainer, announced the first release of his distributed storage subsystem, "which allows [you] to form storage on top of remote and local nodes, which in turn can be exported to another storage as a node to form tree-like storages."

Do we need an open hardware license?

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Hardware

linux.com: Nokia researcher Jamey Hicks recently proposed a Open Source Hardware License (OSHL) for approval by the Open Source Initiative (OSI). Is there a need for a hardware-specific license? If so, what makes hardware different from software?

Windows vs. Linux vs. OS X: CIO John Halamka Tests Ubuntu

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OS

cio.com: Last summer, CareGroup CIO John Halamka began looking for a viable alternative to the Microsoft Windows desktop operating system. Last July, he quit Windows cold turkey and used a MacBook running OS X as his sole computing machine to see how it stacked up against Windows. In August, he worked with two Linux distributions.

Launch Apps Automagically in Gnome

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Software

MaximumPC: Over the last couple of months, a lot of new Linux users have written in to ask how they can get apps to launch automatically in GNOME like they can in Windows. So rather than continue to answer everyone individually, here's an easy tutorial for everyone.

IDC: Patents Inhibit Open Source Adoption

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OSS

internetnews: "The potential for copyright and patent infringement is the No. 1 inhibitor right now for organizations in adopting more open source software in their organization," Lawton said in the afternoon conference call. "Close behind that is the availability of support."

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today's howtos

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News