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Saturday, 24 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux rules the universe by behaving exactly how the user wants Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 2:18pm
Story Ubuntu OS Running Smoothly on Google Nexus 4: Hands-on Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 2:14pm
Story LibreOffice: My birthday wish list Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 2:10pm
Story Android for All: Broadcom Gives Developers Keys to the VideoCore Kingdom Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 1:53pm
Story Steam Hardware Survey Changes, Now Split Per-Platform Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 1:02pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 12:08pm
Story March 2014 Issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine Released Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 12:00pm
Story GLX_MESA_query_renderer Support Comes To All Drivers Rianne Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 8:40am
Story Ubuntu Wallpapers, Fedora 20 Tour, and Linux Rules! Rianne Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 8:29am
Story Tiny ARM/FPGA Zynq COM does Debian Rianne Schestowitz 01/03/2014 - 7:53am

PCLinuxOS Day 11 - Documentation and Information

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: I am not someone who believes that a Linux distributions sells itself, that technological achievement is enough to push it to the desktop of end users. As long as the educational systems keep on teaching Windows-based skills, there will be a lot of users who need some hand holding, some guidance, some instruction. What does PCLinuxOS have to offer in this regard?

KDE 4.0: Everything that has an end, has a beginning

Filed under
Reviews

By now, every Linux user's heard of KDE 4.0, and the controversy surrounding its release. Here's one partisan KDE user's take on it — with screenshots.

SimplyMEPIS 7.0 is a keeper

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: The long awaited SimplyMEPIS 7.0 was finally released just before Christmas, and it was worth the wait. In this mature and sometimes underrated operating system, everything looks good and works well.

Groklaw, Mandriva and Turbolinux

Filed under
MDV

François Bancilhon: Our recent announcement concerning the creation of a joint lab with Turbolinux has generated some controversy. Even PJ, from Groklaw, a site we like very much at Mandriva, showed some concerns and signaled her intention to stop using our Distro.

My thoughts on VectorLinux

Filed under
Linux

Dr Small's Blog: So I was finally able to get VectorLinux downloaded on my limitation of restricted bandwidth, but I was able to do it, so that’s all that matters. Torrents come in handly with my type of bandwidth, considering I can Pause the download Smile

How to Play Prince of Persia on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

softpedia: Prince of Persia is definitely one of my all-time favorite game. It's a third-person action adventure video game published by Ubisoft. Here's what you need to get started:

The First Day of the KDE 4.0 Release Event

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The first day of the KDE 4.0 Release Event in Mountain View, California, got off to a great start on Thursday, with attendees fuelled by a hearty breakfast provided by Google. Then, the "un-conference" was ready to get underway, and within minutes the first topics were added to the whiteboards.

Also:

  • KDE4: Get More Widgets

  • KDE 4.0 Packages Ready for Sabayon
  • First impressions: KDE 4.0

Come Fly with Fluxbuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.blogspot: Fluxbuntu Linux is yet another offshoot of Ubuntu. It uses a Fluxbox window manager as its main aim is to be fast, lightweight, and at the same time full featured. Consequently, the primary objective of Fluxbuntu is to develop an operating system that would be ideal for older or low-end computer machines and even on mobile devices.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenGL - Microsoft left?

  • An Open letter to Mark Shuttleworth
  • The open source development incline
  • CSI: Open Source
  • Linux is greener than Vista
  • New D language pumps up programmer productivity
  • Microsoft Says It Will Release Binary Office Formats - Which?
  • XtreemOS: a Linux-based operating system to support next-generation grids
  • Trac(king) software development
  • Selecting Live Distro for BITA exhibition

A conversation with the autopackage team

Filed under
Interviews

linux.com: Curtis Knight, Isak Savo, and Taj Morton are the lead maintainers and developers of autopackage, a set of tools designed to let developers build and distribute distribution-neutral installation packages. In this interview, they share their vision of the project and where Linux packaging in general is going.

KDE 4.0, A Call for Perspective

Filed under
KDE

linuxtechdaily.com: KDE 4.0 was released last week and all hell seemed to break loose. What I view as a solid first step in a very positive reaction was met with some applause, but generally scorn and complaints. I think some perspective is needed, and I humbly offer to try and provide some.

Miro: Free Television

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: TV. We all watch it. Chances are you might have a DVR hooked up to your TV so you can watch it at any time. If you pay for cable or satellite access, you are probably getting a little tired of those bills as well. If you’re into the ‘net, get rid of those bills and get Miro.

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • Building a Home File Server

  • Streamline browsing and save bandwidth
  • So What is Bashrc?
  • Creating large (>2TB) Linux Partitions
  • New users guide to the terminal
  • Adding Additional Repositories

Arch: the real no-go reason in my case

Filed under
Linux

beranger: I was exaggerating the other day it is not only because of pacman's switches that I won't be using Arch in the predictable future. It's more than that.

Interview: OLPC's Michail Bletsas Part 1 [of 2]

Filed under
OLPC
Interviews

gearlog.com: When Nicholas Negroponte's One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative was first announced, the project was nearly universally lauded by the tech press. We caught up with OLPC's Chief Connectivity Officer, Michail Bletsas, to speak about these issues and the future of One Laptop Per Child.

Criminalist Testifies That Blood Was Found In Reiser House

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: Jurors judging the murder trial of Linux guru Hans Reiser were provided a glimpse into the prosecution's forensic evidence -- trace amounts of "nice shiny red" blood found inside the defendant's house -- the last place his wife Nina Reiser was seen alive.

Flock 1.1 beta will add web Email, Picasa and more to your web browser

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad: Social web browser Flock is planning to launch 3 major new features in about two weeks. Like its predecessors, Flock 1.1 beta is built on Firefox code but it has a ton of features that make it easier to keep in touch with your social networking services like Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, and YouTube.

PCLinuxOS 2008 on my ThinkPad T61 - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

temporaryland.wordpress: As I mentioned on Part 1 of this review the version of PCLinuxOS I am using is the MiniMe 2008 edition. For those of us that already know what applications we need, the MiniMe edition is actually preferred. It is very easy to install the needed applications from Synaptic.

Also: PCLOS Day 10 - 2008 MiniME Edition Impressions

more Sun MySQL headlines

Filed under
Software
  • A bright future for MySQL

  • Give Me a M: The MySQL/Sun Q&A
  • Sun proves the open market with MySQL
  • $1 Billion and Not a Thing to Wear
  • Sun, MySQL and the return of integrated solutions
  • What do the database deals mean?
  • Open Source Groups Upbeat, Cautious on Sun-MySQL

SSH: Best Practices

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Are you using SSH in the best way possible? Have you configured it to be as limited and secure as possible? The goal of this document is to kick in the new year with some best practices for SSH: why you should use them, how to set them up, and how to verify that they are in place. All of the examples below assume that you are using EnGarde Secure Linux but any modern Linux distribution will do just fine since, as far as I know, everybody ships OpenSSH.

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today's leftovers

  • Effective Microservices Architecture with Event-Driven Design
    There’s no doubt, in the IT world, microservices are sexy. But just because you find something cool and attractive doesn’t mean it’s good for you. And it doesn’t mean you know how to use it properly.
  • Cloud Foundry Makes its Mark on the Enterprise
    "Proprietary will have to either get on board or be left in the dust."
  • Tumbleweed Review of the week 2017/25
    With the pace of Tumbleweed having resumed to ‘almost daily snapshots’ I will to the review again weekly instead of bi-weekly. It’s just easier to remember what big updates came in like this. This week I will cover the 6 snapshots 0616,0617,0618,0619,0620 and 0622 (again, 0622 just passed openQA and you will get it shortly on the mirror). There was also a 0621 tested, but discarded by openQA.
  • S10E16 – Enthusiastic Woozy Route
    It’s Season Ten Episode Sixteen of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Martin Wimpress and Joey Sneddon are connected and speaking to your brain.
  • My Meetup Slides: Deploy and Manage Kubernetes Clusters on Ubuntu in the Oracle Cloud
  •  
  • MinnowBoard 3 will offer Apollo Lake, triple M.2s, and Raspberry Pi expansion
    Minnowboard.org is prepping an open spec “MinnowBoard 3” SBC with a quad-core Apollo Lake, 4GB LPDDR4, 8GB eMMC, 3x M.2 sockets, and an RPi connector. The Intel-backed Minnowboard.org project has posted preliminary specs for an open-spec MinnowBoard 3 model to follow the recently shipped MinnowBoard Turbo Quad. Due to ship in the fall, the community-backed MinnowBoard 3 stands out with a 14nm Apollo Lake Atom, three M.2 sockets, and an “RPI” adapter. The only RPI we know of is Raspberry Pi, or more specifically, its much copied 40-pin expansion connector.
  • Open source social robot kit runs on Raspberry Pi and Arduino
    Thecorpora’s Scratch-ready “Q.bo One” robot is based on the RPi 3 and Arduino, and offers stereo cams, mics, a speaker, and visual and language recognition. In 2010, robotics developer Francisco Paz and his Barcelona-based Thecorpora startup introduced the first Qbo “Cue-be-oh” robot as an open source proof-of-concept and research project for exploring AI capabilities in multi-sensory, interactive robots. Now, after a preview in February at Mobile World Congress, Thecorpora has gone to Indiegogo to launch the first mass produced version of the social robot in partnership with Arrow.

Desktop: Popcorn Linux, Purism, Distro Hopping, System76, and 2017 Linux Laptop Survey

  • Popcorn Linux OS gives processors a common language
    Thanks to a new operating system called Popcorn Linux, the Navy may be able to speed systems development and cut maintenance. Developed by engineering researchers at Virginia Tech with support from the Office of Naval Research,  Popcorn Linux can compile different programming languages into a common format. The operating system takes generic coding language and translates it into multiple specialized program languages. Then it determines what pieces of the code are needed to perform particular tasks and transfers these instruction “kernels” (the “popcorn” part) to the appropriate function, ONR officials said. Chips for video systems might be programmed in one language and those for networking functions in another. These multicore processors improve computing speed, but they also force programmers to design or upgrade applications based on what programs run on which processors. That means complex systems like battlespace awareness and artificial intelligence that require specialized processors must be manually adjusted so components can interact with each other.
  • Purism's Security Focused Librem Laptops Go Mainstream as GA Begins, with $2.5M in Total Project Funding and 35 Percent Average Monthly Growth
  • Now it’s easier to buy Purism’s Linux laptops
    After running a crowdfunding campaign in 2015 to raise money for a laptop that runs free and open source software, Purism has been able to ship a limited number of 13 and 15 inch laptops, and the corporation is taking pre-orders for a 2-in-1 tablet.
  • Are You a Distro Hopper?
    Is distro hopping a dying sport or have I just gotten too old? When I first started to use Linux I was the quintessential cliche distro hopper. I swapped and switched flavor of Linux seemingly every other day, certain that at some point I’d find the right fit and stop, content with at whatever combination of distro base and desktop environment I’d hit upon.
  • System76 Continues Working On GNOME Improvements For Future Ubuntu
    System76 continues working on improvements to the GNOME stack as part of their transition in-step to using it over Unity 7, in line with Canonical's decision to switch Ubuntu over to GNOME and abandon their grand Unity 8 ambitions.
  • 2017 Linux Laptop Survey
    It has been a few years since last running any Linux hardware surveys on Phoronix, as overall the ecosystem has rather matured nicely while of course there are still notable improvements to be had in the areas of GPUs and laptops. (Additionally, OpenBenchmarking.org provides a plethora of analytic capabilities when not seeking to collect subjective data / opinions.) But now we are hosting the 2017 Linux Laptop Survey to hopefully further improvements in this area.

Software and GNOME: Pass, Popcorn Time, Nixnote2, Grive, Curlew, and GtkActionMuxer

  • Pass – A Simple command-line Password Manager for Linux
    Keep tracking the password is one of the big challenge to everyone now a days since we has multiple password like email, bank, social media, online portal, and ftp, etc.,. Password managers are become very famous due to the demand and usage. In Linux so many alternatives are available, GUI based and CLI based. Today we are going to discuss about CLI based password manager called pass.
  • Popcorn Time Watch Movies and TV Shows On Linux
    ​Watching your favorite TV shows and movies series is what you all guys do every day. Flash, Iron Fist or Moana and many more awesome movies and tv shows that we love to watch. The problems come when you are traveling. Many of your shows or movies are restricted to a particular region and cannot be accessed when you are traveling or want to just quickly watch that awesome flash punch from an episode of 1 month old.
  • Nixnote2 – A Clone of Evernote for Linux
    When I created a list of Alternative Evernote Clients for Linux, the formerly known NeverNote was on the list as NixNote since it hadn’t gained a “2” to its title yet. It has been 4 months since and I decided to give the app its own review for you guys. Without further ado, let’s get to it. NixNote2 (also called NixNote) is an unofficial client of Evernote for Linux. It possesses most of the features Evernote provides including the use of Notebooks, tags, themes, emails, and multiple accounts.
  • Grive – A Dockerized Google Drive Client for Linux
    Not too long ago I reviewed Grive2 as an alternative Google Drive client for Linux. Today, I’ll introduce you to Grive, a Docker implementation for the Google Drive client, Grive2. Docker (if you don’t already know what it is), is a tool designed to benefit both system admins and developers thanks to its use of containers. Docker’s containers provide a way for developers to create and distribute their apps using containers.
  • Curlew is a GTK Media Converter for the GNOME desktop
    There are plenty of free multimedia converters for Ubuntu available, with command-line champ FFmpeg arguably the most powerful of them all. But this power comes with a complexity. Using FFMpeg to convert media through the command line can be intimidating and arcane. Which is why FFMpeg frontends are popular.
  • Dazzle spotlight – Multi Paned and Action Muxing
    The way the GtkActionMuxer works is by following the widget hierarchy to resolve GActions. Since the HeaderBar is a sibling to the content area (and not a direct ancestor) you cannot activate those actions. It would be nice for the muxer to gain more complex support, but until then… Dazzle.