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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Is Linux only for the poor?

Filed under
Linux

education.zdnet.com: Last week, I followed a conversation on an OpenSuse Education newsletter to which I subscribe. If you have money in your district, is there any reason to use Linux?

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Review

Filed under
PCLOS

linuxbsdos.com: PCLinuxOS is a Linux distribution based on Mandriva Linux. The most recent update, and the first since the last update in 2007, was released last week.

GNOME 2.26: Fast & Stable, But Light On The New Features

Filed under
Software

itnewstoday.com: GNOME is a very stable and fast desktop environment that’s easy to love. Not to disappoint, GNOME 2.26 is here right on schedule and was released last week. However, a lack of exciting new features prevents it from becoming an all-star.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #134

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #134 for the week of March 15th- March 21st, 2009 is now available.

My Gimp Tutorial and Resource Linklist

Filed under
Web
GIMP

penguinpetes.com: Gimp just seems to be a buzz topic lately. Since I have searches pouring into my site to find the five or six little Gimp tutorials I have, here is a whole list of resources from my personal bookmark list, covering everything from beginners to intermediate to expert advice:

xmlstarlet: Command Line XML Toolkit

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: With the proliferation of XML-based formats, it is nice to have tools that manipulate XML documents in the traditional Unix-like fashion, as the good old grep, sed, and other tools do for plain text.

Blind leading the blind

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the problems many veteran users have with the rise of Ubuntu is how message boards and communities get polluted with the clueless new users. Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with looking for a little help or offering some of your own knowledge. But the old adage holds water; one can know just enough to cause trouble.

My dog is more Linux than your dog

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Is there really a way for any one distro to be "more Linux' than another? Possibly the answer is yes and no, right down the middle.

We Won't Leave You Behind...

Filed under
KDE

christian-loose.de: Although the future belongs to newer application launchers like Kickoff, Lancelot or Raptor, some users prefer the old K Menu style.

ATI Linux Drivers Gain Support For Unreleased RS880

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix.com: AMD's current flagship offering when it comes to integrated ATI graphics is the Radeon HD 3300 / 790GX. As something new for consumers to consider, soon it looks like AMD will be introducing the RS880.

Arduino hardware hacking: Part 1

Filed under
Hardware

tuxradar.com: Arduino is cool. It's cool because it's a tiny device - about three inches by two inches - that comes with a USB port and a programmable chip. It's cool because you can program it using a very simple programming language known as Wiring.

THREE reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3

Filed under
OOo

collinpark.blogspot: OK, here are three reasons to upgrade to openoffice.org3 if you're still using 2.x

Six Latest Firefox Addons You Should Check Out

Filed under
Moz/FF

killertechtips.com: We all love Firefox for the sheer number of extensions that can be added to it. There are plenty of brilliant yet unpopular extensions that have been written about before.

Move over Tux; it's time for Tuz the Tassie Devil

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Ever socially aware, Linux has a new mascot for a short while. Tuz will instead embrace the boot screen of many a distro in kernel 2.6.29.

Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 10 Server

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install and use KVM for creating and running virtual machines on a Fedora 10 server. I will show how to create image-based virtual machines and also virtual machines that use a logical volume (LVM).

Review - OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
Reviews

I decided to install OpenSUSE this weekend onto my new Maxtor 4 USB hard drive. I've used the live CD before with KDE 4.1, but didn't like not having the option to have different backgrounds on the multiple desktops. Supposedly, this option and others will be available in KDE 4.2. So, instead of waiting, I decided to install KDE 3.5.10. Here's how it went.....

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Arch Linux Review

  • A PCLinuxOS 2009.1 userbar
  • SAM-Linux, PCLinuxOS' Ugly Duckling?
  • pwn2own confusion
  • Installing Linux on my girfriend’s laptop: an overview
  • Digest of Enlightenment 17 Dimensions
  • FLOSS Weekly 61: Arduino
  • Linux
  • A Working X Input 2 Implementation
  • Programming for Kids with Basic-256 on Ubuntu
  • why I chose openSuSE again and howto make updates faster

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Easily Get free newsgroup access over ipv6 in Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu: Picviz 0.5 Installation
  • How To Configure PXE Boot on CentOS 5
  • How to set up a web server with Apache
  • TV-Browser - A Digital TV Guide in openSUSE
  • Fixing High Latency with KDE4 - Display Flickering - Freezing Videos
  • Get system specs in Linux
  • Domainkeys/Dkim with Postfix (quick way)
  • Mplayer on Gentoo with VDPAU
  • Configure BIND 9 For IPv4 (or IPv6) Only

2009 and still in fear of using new hardware in GNU/Linux!

Filed under
Linux

When the GNU/Linux revolution started reaching the masses, around 2000, I predicted that by 2010 there would be full vendor support for the free operating system. Well, it’s 2009, and I have to admit it — I am feeling nervous. Read the full article at Freesoftware Magazine.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space: Linux and Systemd

  • Linus Torvalds tells kernel devs to fix their regressive fixing
    Linus Torvalds has given the Linux kernel development community a bit of a touch-up, after finding some contributions to Linux 4.18 complicated the kernel development process. In his post announcing release candidate 2 of Linux kernel 4.18, Torvalds mentioned “some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs.” “I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were ‘fixes’ not in the ‘regressions’ sense, but in the ‘missing features’ sense.”
  • Why data centers need log management tools

    Even though systemd is a common logging method, rsyslog offers more features. One main capability is being able to write log messages to a specific database. You can also configure rsyslog logs on one main server for centralized access.

  • Systemd v239 released
    Systemd v239 has been released with a long list of changes; click below for the full set. "A new system.conf setting NoNewPrivileges= is now available which may be used to turn off acquisition of new privileges system-wide (i.e. set Linux' PR_SET_NO_NEW_PRIVS for PID 1 itself, and thus also for all its children). Note that turning this option on means setuid binaries and file system capabilities lose their special powers. While turning on this option is a big step towards a more secure system, doing so is likely to break numerous pre-existing UNIX tools, in particular su and sudo."

Canonical/Ubuntu Watching You

  • Two-thirds of Ubuntu users are happy to give up data on their PC
    As announced back at the start of the year, Canonical made the decision that Ubuntu would collect data on its user base – and now the initial results of those statistics have been published by the firm, including the headline fact that 67% of users were happy to provide details of their PC (and other bits and pieces). So, this scheme that has been unfavorably compared to Microsoft’s collection of telemetry data in Windows 10, which has long been a point of controversy. However, it appears that the majority of folks are happy to give up their data to the company providing their Linux distribution, and don’t seem perturbed by this prospect.
  • Ubuntu reports 67% of users opt in to on-by-default PC specs slurp [Ed: 33% of Ubuntu users say to Canonical "don't spy on me" and Canonical then counts them, which means that Canonical collects data on them, too]
    However just 33 per cent of the undisclosed number of users Canonical’s analysed didn’t opt in to the slurpage. Which is where things get a little bit weird, because Canonical’s post reports an “Opt In rate”. Yet the data slurpage is selected by default: there’s an active opt out but a passive opt in.
  • The Average Ubuntu Install Takes 18 Minutes (And Other Stats)
    Did you know that the average Ubuntu install takes just 18 minutes? That’s one of several nuggets of information Canonical has collected (and now revealed) thanks to the new “Ubuntu Report” tool included in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. This tool, when given permission to, collects non-identifiable system data about new Ubuntu installs and upgrades and ferries it back to Canonical for analysis.

Linux Foundation's TODO and New Chinese Ties

  • The Linux Foundation and TODO Group Release Chinese Versions of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise
    -The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has released Chinese translations of 10 Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, created to help executives, open source program managers, developers, attorneys and decision makers learn how to best leverage open source.
  • Tencent joins the Linux Foundation as a platinum member
    Chinese tech giant Tencent has announced it’s joined the Linux Foundation as a platinum member. Tencent is one of a few companies to offer the highest level of support to the Linux Foundation. Other tech companies in this stable include IBM, Microsoft, and Intel, as well as fellow Chinese titan Huawei. As part of the deal, Tencent will take a chair on the Foundation’s board of directors. It has also promised to offer “further support and resources” to the Foundation’s efforts. So far, this has taken the form of Tencent donating several pieces of its software.
  • Tencent becomes a Linux Foundation platinum member to increase its focus on open source
    Tencent, the $500-billion Chinese internet giant, is increasing its focus on open source after it became a platinum member of the Linux Foundation. The company has long been associated with the foundation and Linux generally, it is a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s deep learning program that launched earlier this year, and now as a platinum member (the highest tier) it will take a board of directors seat and work more closely with the organization. That works two ways, with Tencent pledging to offer “further support and resources” to foundation projects and communities, while the Chinese firm itself will also tap into the foundation’s expertise and experience.
  • Tencent Supports Open Source Community With Linux Foundation Platinum Membership
    LinuxCon China -- The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announces Tencent has become the latest Platinum member of the foundation. Tencent is a leading provider of Internet value added services in China, offering some of China's most popular websites, apps and services including QQ, Qzone, Tencent Cloud and Weixin/WeChat.
  • TARS and TSeer Form Open Source Project Communities Under The Linux Foundation to Expand Adoption and Pace of Development
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China in Beijing that TARS, a remote procedure call (RPC) framework, and TSeer, a high availability service discovery, registration and fault tolerance framework, have become Linux Foundation projects. Both projects were initially developed by leading Chinese technology company, Tencent, which open sourced the projects last year. This follows the announcement of Tencent becoming a Platinum member of The Linux Foundation, and reflects the foundation’s growing collaboration with the Chinese open source community.
  • Tencent Becomes Latest Platinum Member of Linux Foundation
    Chinese behemoth looking to cultivate open source ties The Linux Foundation has announced that Tencent has become the latest member to obtain platinum membership. The non-profit American tech company, which is funded by membership payments, uses the funding for sustainable open source projects. Within the foundation, there are three membership tiers, starting from silver to gold, all the way up to platinum where members have to pay $500,000 a year (approx. £377,643) for that category.
  • Tencent Joins The Linux Foundation, Open-Sources Projects
    China's Tencent holding conglomerate that backs a variety of Internet services/products is the latest platinum member of the Linux Foundation.

Events: DebCamp, openSUSE Conference, OSSummit Japan 2018

  • Yes! I am going to...
    Of course, DebCamp is not a vacation, so we expect people that take part of DebCamp to have at least a rough sketch of activities. There are many, many things I want to tackle, and experience shows there's only time for a fraction of what's planned.
  • Dates, Location set for openSUSE Conference 2019
    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce the location and dates for the 2019 openSUSE Conference. The openSUSE Conference 2019 will return to the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, and be Friday, May 24, through Sunday, May 26. Planning for the 2019 conference will begin this summer and community members are encouraged to take part in the planning of the conference through the organizing team. The openSUSE Board proposed the idea of having organizing team for openSUSE Conferences last month at oSC18. An email about the organizing team was sent out to the openSUSE-Project mailing list.
  • OSSummit Japan 2018
    Some Debian developers (Jose from Microsoft and Michael from credativ) gave a talk during this event.