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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will Android and Chrome marry? Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:35am
Story Elive 2.3.9 beta released Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:32am
Story Mobile pico projector does surround sound too Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:28am
Story The Free Software Foundation opens nominations for the 17th annual Free Software Awards Roy Schestowitz 18/10/2014 - 6:22am
Story For Gentoo Linux Initiates, Iron Penguin May Be Too Heavy Roy Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 9:54pm
Story AMD's Radeon R9 285 On Linux Offers Good OpenCL Performance Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 3:38pm
Story Feature-creep will ensure that systemd stays Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 3:32pm
Story Qt 5.4 Beta Available Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 3:28pm
Story Wine 1.7.29 Is Still Implementing DirectWrite Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 1:56pm
Story IPFire 2.15 Core 84 Firewall OS Gets Fixes for Shellshock and Other Issues Rianne Schestowitz 17/10/2014 - 1:48pm

What a nuisance (gNewSense)

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: The latest release, 2.1, was just announced on Distrowatch. Based on Ubuntu, it strips out all the proprietary bits, including codecs and drivers, and forces the end user to initially use the open and free equivalents if they exist. If they don't then you're stuck without features such as 3D acceleration, DVD playback, QuickTime movies, etc.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #106

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #106 for the week of August 24th - August 30th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Second Ubuntu Developers Week, Intrepid feature freeze - Alpha 5 freeze ahead, Call for testing of 2.6.27 kernel(Intrepid), and Xfce 4.6-beta now available for Intrepid users.

Ubuntu Studio: Pictorial Walkthrough

Filed under
Linux

freedomyug.wordpress: Ubuntu Studio is a tailor made multimedia creation flavor of Ubuntu aimed at audio/video, graphic editors, both enthusiasts and professionals. One could setup a decent studio, and connect midi devices, synthesizers, audio/video recording devices, additional sound cards and installing ubuntu studio on the system.

Crystal Ball Sunday #10: Linux Vendor Consolidation

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Welcome to the 10th installment of the Crystal Ball Sunday series. This is an exciting time to be involved with Linux because the temperature is right for some Linux vendor consolidation.

Open opportunity

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

thehindubusinessline.com: What is hot in the open source software scene? eWorld chatted with Gery Messer, President, Red Hat Asia Pacific, for an update. Here goes:

Firefox, the king of web browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF

freesoftwaremagazine.com: After Microsoft killed Netscape, there was no serious competitor to Internet Explorer in the browser wars. For years, Microsoft lorded its dominance of the web browser market. Then along came Firefox, the open source web browser that took the world by storm.

21st Century Desktops, Linux or Windows, Does It Matter?

Filed under
OS

techrepublic.com/forum: It is with considerable amusement I view the verbal skirmishes between the gathering Linux and Windoze factions, almost like watching differing Religious sects gather. There are obvious advantages to each O.S. and the philosophy's behind their development. So what, does it really matter what the desktop of the 21st century is? In the whole overview I doubt it makes any difference at all.

20 Linux apps you can't live without

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: Following the success of our 25 killer apps for Linux post, we've dug deep to find the 20 must-have apps you should get your hands on today. Believe us when we say that for Linux users, they're indispensable.

Top 7 Best-kept Linux Secrets

Filed under
Software

As we all know, there are a vast amount of applications available for Linux. People outside the Linux scene will probably have heard and used the most famous open source apps, but there are a select few programs that are either insanely cool and innovative, or just extremely polished.

4 Open Source Collection Manager Apps

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: I have way too much stuff. I managed to find four open source programs that all call themselves “collection managers.” That is, they all claim to make it easy to catalog and keep track of your collections of things like books, movies, and CDs.

Top Free Linux Online Courses

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: If you plan to get your Linux knowledge a formal nurturing, an online course may be something you would be interested in! These courses would be beneficial for people interested to master the art of Linux.

Open Source In Action -- Xi'An

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com/blogs: Last month, I had a good opportunity to visit Xi'an Software Park with SUN, Intel and Red flag for 'Open source In Day'. This is second time I went to Xian, the event also let me more understand the development of software in this ancient city.

It’s a joke: In a Linux world without walls who needs Windows?

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Microsoft are poised to launch a new $USD 300 million advertising campaign this week, starring comedian Jerry Seinfeld among others. The marketing types responsible are intending to counter Apple’s successful "I’m a Mac" line, but the slogan picked out is simply on the wrong foot from the start and is thwarted by Linux immediately.

My Favorite Linux Podcasts

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: In the recent years, podcasting has been gaining momentum and today we have a multitude of podcasts for almost every topic, including my favorite (and yours, I hope), GNU/Linux. Instead of listening to the same song over and over, why not educate yourself about the latest in open source technology?

Boxee

Boxee is an open, connected and social media center for Linux and OSX (Windows not supported yet). At the moment it is still in an Alpha stadium, but I haven’t had much problems with it. You will need an invite to be able to use Boxee, not to worry, I’m giving them away.

Interview with a new Linux user

Filed under
Linux

briancarper.net: After countless, endless hours of nagging on my part, my girlfriend finally put Linux on her laptop. I thought it would be interesting to hear what a long-time Windows-using non-programmer thinks of Linux (Kubuntu in this case) after a few weeks of use. So I interviewed her.

The "Appliancising" of Free Software

Filed under
Linux

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: Ever since I watched the fledgling Free Software movement take hold a few years ago in Thailand, I've thought that the current trend of what I'll call "appliancising" was the natural end game for Free Software (and really all OSes in general).

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Rant

  • Linux/BSD Versions I have tried
  • Linux redo
  • Slackware to Wolvix
  • EeePC Skin / Linux Mint
  • Linux, College, and Others

Displaying RSS And Atom Feeds On Your Web Site With SimplePie

Filed under
HowTos

SimplePie is a PHP library that can fetch, cache, parse, and normalize RSS and Atom feeds. It allows you to display the newest articles from websites with RSS or Atom feeds on your own site. This is a great way to add new, fresh, and relevant information to your site.

DevTodo: a reminder/task program aimed at developers

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: DevTodo is a simple command-line-based package to keep todo lists. Lists are prioritized and hierarchical. Each task in the list has a priority (very high, low, medium etc.) and a given task can be linked to another todo database, making the list hierarchical.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.