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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

SplashTop Source Code Released

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: It was a month ago that we first looked at SplashTop on the ASUS P5E3 Deluxe motherboard and found this to be a very exciting and forthcoming technology. If you missed our earlier article, SplashTop is an instant-on Linux desktop environment.

Microsoft cements OpenXML standard with Daisy deal

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: Microsoft has cemented OpenXML as a standard by creating an open source plug-in for the Daisy Consortium enabling Word files to be used by the blind and those with severe dyslexia.

Foresight Linux KDE Edition: The start of the odyssey!

Filed under
Linux

ogmaciel.com: I decided to give KDE a chance on my home system. The first step was to download the brand spanking alpha ISO for Foresight Linux KDE Edition and bring it home.

short takes

Filed under
Software
  • Firefox Cool Add-on : speed dial

  • KuFtp — A Graphical FTP Client for KDE
  • Display graphic representation of Linux system load average over ssh session
  • “Service” Tool Available on Ubuntu 7.10
  • GPW: generate pronounceable passwords

KWin Basics part 1.1 - Window Management

Filed under
KDE

gnuski.blogspot: KDE has its own Window Manager (WM) named KWin. KWin is great! It remembers your window sizes and placements, so that when you open those applications in the future, they're right where you left them.

Kernel space: Memory management for graphics processors

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: The management of video hardware has long been an area of weakness in the Linux system (and free operating systems in general). The X Window System tends to get a lot of the blame for problems in this area, but the truth of the matter is that the problems are more widespread and the kernel has never made it easy for X to do this job properly.

Arch 2007.08-2 Review

Filed under
Linux

Acrh Linux is lean, wicked and it allows all types to possibilities. It allows the user to custom tailor the distribution as per his/her taste. It has a great package manager. A package manager that is being used by lot of other distributions like frugalware, archie and faun.

Makagiga: More tools than you can shake a stick at

Filed under
Software

linux.com: While it's unclear what Maka stands for, the "giga" part of Makagiga most likely refers to the number of tools this application has on offer. It comes with a to-do manager, RSS reader, a basic photo viewer/editor, a text editor, miscellaneous widgets, and much more. Makagiga is written in Java, so it runs on any platform with Java Runtime Environment.

Windows vs. Linux Compared With Mixed Results

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

OSWeekly: I hear this too often - Windows is easier to use than Linux. And so in light of this, being as I have used both operating systems for years, I thought I would put this to the test, the results are not going to make Windows users feel too good about this desktop choice overall, I'm afraid.

Ubuntu desktop eye-candy with AWN

Filed under
Software
HowTos

tectonic: Tired of the regulation grey bars at the top and bottom of your Gnome desktop and hankering after something a little cooler? Say something a little bit more like the dock in Apple's OSX? Then give AWN a run and get all the bouncing icons you can handle.

Eeextremely Eeenticing: a review of the Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Reviews

arstechnica: The Asus Eee PC challenges many conventional assumptions about mobile computing. The daring, diminutive device combines a svelte subnotebook form factor with a unique Linux software platform and a budget-friendly price—factors that could make this unprecedented product a mainstream marvel.

I dunno what people say when they talk about RPM hell

Filed under
Software

Rudd-O: When people talk about RPM dependency hell, I really have no idea what they’re talking about. Here’s a factual look into RPM that should set the record straight:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • aseigo: chinny chin chin

  • Benchmark your system in Ubuntu
  • Retrieving Linux Standard Base and Distro Information
  • Nice games for your Linux box
  • Fedora Firstboot
  • Linux Vs Bsd - a comparison
  • Desktop Linux old and new
  • Ubuntu Customization Kit 2.0 is out
  • Don't cry for Microsoft (the truth is, it never loved you)
  • My Own Linux Distro: The Beginning
  • BBC Radio Player and Linux
  • Worldwide Mandriva Linux 2008 install fest
  • Update on the Firefox 3 Linux Theme
  • Rory Reiser Thinks His Dad May Have Killed His Mom

Windows Users download Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

abhay-techzone.blogspot: Today I was downloading Ubuntu 7.10 desktop i386 iso and came across an interesting fact. I was using kTorrent and was delighted to see more than 1400 seeders and around 150 leechers. There were seeders from many countries.

Is Wal-Mart's gPC The Linux Version Of The Mac Mini?

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: Back when Everex's Linux-based "Green PC" hit stores courtesy of Wal-Mart, I wasn't all that excited about it -- I saw it as being an also-ran to a much more exciting product, the Asus Eee subnotebook (also Linux-based). That said, the gPC is apparently selling like mad -- and now I think I see why: it's the Linux version of the Mac Mini, sort of.

Car computer runs Red Flag Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices: DingCheng Electronics has announced a GPS-enabled PC that fits "double DIN" stereo bays. The CarPC 102 has a 4x45W amp, and runs Red Flag Linux or Windows on a 1.1GHz Pentium M processor.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Emulate Google’s Android Mobile Stack in Linux

  • Printing from Firefox on Gentoo
  • Fix for Master password expose for Pidgin
  • Two Finger Scrolling on Ubuntu
  • Setting up openSUSE in VMware Workstation
  • Installing Ubuntu to a USB hard drive

KStars Image Challenge

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers: Do you want to help improve KStars, but don't want to do programming or debugging? Do you like pretty pictures?

Tour of GNOME Online Desktop

Filed under
Software

Red Hat Magazine: Here’s a tour of the pre-alpha demo release of GNOME Online Desktop included in Fedora 8. Learn more about what it does and how you can get involved in the project.

Portrait: Alien Arena creator John Diamond

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: John Diamond is the creator and lead developer of the popular free software game Alien Arena. He turned his hobbies and a talent for coding into a small business.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming