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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 1:11am
Story New To Linux? Don’t Use Ubuntu, You’ll Probably Like Linux Mint Better Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 12:03am
Story IceCat 31.4.0 release Rianne Schestowitz 29/01/2015 - 12:02am
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 11:51pm
Story These Are the Hottest New Open Source Projects Right Now Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 9:31pm
Story Review: Kdenlive, the Linux video editor I want to use Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 9:25pm
Story Atomic Mode-Setting/Display Support Progresses In Linux 3.20 Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 7:53pm
Story Industrial box-PC takes Linux-on-Haswell to extremes Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 7:49pm
Story Deploying tor relays Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 7:47pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2015 - 6:31pm

AIR on Linux test run

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: AIR (Adobe Integrated Runtime) is a cross-operating system runtime that lets you use rich Internet applications that combine HTML, Ajax, Adobe Flash, and Adobe Flex technologies. What that means to you and me is that it's lets us run another kind of application on our Internet-connected Windows PCs, Macs, and just this month, Linux desktop computers.

What’s Your Holiday Gift to the Linux Community?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: In case you forgot to put the Linux community on your list or in case you just couldn’t find anything for them, you’re in luck. There’s a last minute gift opportunity:

Blah blah blah Linux blog clients blah blah blah

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: I’m appalled. No, I’m worse than appalled. I’m horrified, shocked, amazed, disgusted, insulted and flummoxed. Apparently — and as always, please tell me if I am wrong — but there is no blogging software for Linux that does not have ties to the Gnome horde.

The GPL is not a burden

Filed under
OSS

loupgaroublond.blogspot: One editor of the LWN commented recently on his yearly predictions for the ecosystem and how well they performed. Perhaps the grumpy editor was a bit too grumpy this year. There hasn't even been enough coal to go around in people's stockings.

notifications

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: I do have to say that it's a little embarrassing that Mark's blog got picked up by places like Slashdot. I really hope it was a slow news day or something, but I suspect a bit of star worship at play.

Three Great Distributions for Christmas: sidux, AntiX M8.0 and SimplyMEPIS 8.0

Filed under
Linux

lxer.com: The Debian project has packaged and produced some really great software and the latest project, code named "Lenny" has resulted in a couple of really outstanding derivatives, AntiX and its parent SimplyMEPIS. In addition, the Debian project "Sid", has led to the creation of an awesome cutting edge system called sidux. Any of the three would make a great Christmas gift for the Linux geek in your life.

Linux in 2009: Recession vs. GNU

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Pundits and business executives alike are predicting gloomy economic times for 2009. But when the talk turns to free and open source software (FOSS), suddenly the mood brightens. Whether their concern is the business opportunities in open source or the promotion of free software idealism, experts see FOSS as starting from a strong base and actually benefiting from the hard times expected next year.

Christmas Eve with KDE4

Filed under
KDE

teknostatik.co.uk: While I’m off for Christmas, I thought I’d spend a little time getting to know KDE4. To stop me cheating, I installed the latest KDE version of Mandriva One, which means I’m without a fair few other things I’m very reliant on.

Also: Little kchristmas present

Gifts for All in Linux 2.6.28

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Linux creator Linus Torvalds is expected to soon release the final Linux kernel of 2008, loaded full of stocking stuffers for users of the open source operating system.

Will commercialisation destroy Linux?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: I have noticed a fellow wooden spoon brandishing compatriot mention several times that commercialisation will destroy the Linux dream. That when the smell of money starts effusing from Linux then the sharks will come and trample all over the Linux utopia.

Five useful command one liners

Filed under
HowTos

commandline.org.uk: I had a browse through my shell history (history | less), and there are some interesting commands that I have used recently. The really experienced command line warriors among you will probably know them already, but it never hurts to have a reminder.

Linux Foundation Looks to 2009

Filed under
Linux

itbusinessedge.com: As we begin to close the books on 2008 and look into the proverbial crystal ball for open source in the new year, I thought the Linux Foundation was a logical place to start. So I asked LF Marketing what the top five open source predictions would be.

How to export your Firefox 3.0 full profile to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
HowTos

This article explains how to move a full profile (addons, themes, cookies, browsing history, passwords and so on) from Firefox 3.0.x to Firefox 3.1.x beta or any other version, but it also works for synchronizing Firefox on 2 different computers or backing up a full profile of Firefox.

Read about moving a FF 3.0 profile to FF 3.1x here.

unrelated downtime

Filed under
Site News

Well, just as I posted the "all is well" blog entry, we suffered a power outage here.

How To Chroot Apache 2 Web Server Under Red Hat / CentOS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security

A chroot on Red Hat / CentOS / Fedora Linux operating changes the apparent disk root directory for the Apache process and its children. Once this is done attacker or other php / perl / python scripts cannot access or name files outside that directory. This is called a "chroot jail" for Apache. You should never ever run a web server without jail. There should be privilege separation between web server and rest of the system.

OS shoot-out: Windows vs. Mac OS X vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: The Mac's been on a roll, both due to its highly regarded Mac OS X Leopard operating system and to an unhappy reception for Microsoft's Windows Vista. The result: For the first time in memory, the Mac's market share has hit 9.1 percent, and Windows' market share has dipped below 90 percent. (Linux distributions make up the rest.)

The Other Secret to Red Hat’s Success: A Magazine (No Joke)

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: What’s the biggest secret to Red Hat’s success in a down economy? Plenty of pundits think it’s Linux and JBoss open source middleware. But The VAR Guy has another theory:

Alan Cox and the End of an Era

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: In the beginning, free software was an activity conducted on the margins - using spare time on a university's computers, or the result of lonely bedroom hacking. One of the key moments in the evolution of free software was when hackers began to get jobs.

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: There's no question that the open source community is a passionate one -- and one with significant influence on technology directions and options. We're way past the days when people asked if Linux or Apache was safe to depend on in business. Open source is now a mainstream part of the technology fabric. 11 leaders outline the challenges and opportunities ahead.

BREAKING: compiz++ branch hits git

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Ladies and Gentlemen what you are seeing here may well be the future of compiz as we know it, in a new compiz branch called compiz++ which allows for really neat things like:

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.