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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 4MRecover 11.0 Beta OS Can Help Users Recover Lost Files Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 11:19am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 9:15am
Story Will New Google Android Live TV Outfox Apple? Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 8:55am
Story Q4OS Is a Windows-Lookalike OS That Now Comes with LXDE and Xfce as Well Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 12:57am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 12:46am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 12:44am
Story Linux Mint Debian Might Not Adopt Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 12:43am
Story Latest SteamOS Update Brings New NVIDIA and AMD Drivers Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 9:22pm
Story Your Old Computer Can Live Again with Emmabuntüs 2 Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 7:50pm
Story 11 years developing Krita Roy Schestowitz 27/12/2014 - 7:41pm

Sapphire Radeon HD 4830 512MB

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Hardware The launch of the RV770 GPU earlier this year by AMD was quite successful. The Radeon HD 4850 and Radeon HD 4870 series feature best-in-class performance. If you are looking for leading performance and all of the bells and whistles on the newest ATI graphics cards but at a lower cost, AMD recently introduced the Radeon HD 4830.

13 Great Linux Videos!

Linux does not need multi-million advertising on top TV networks!
Every one of us can spread the word, with such high quality videos.

Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10

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In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project.

Linux Setup iSCSI Target ( SAN )

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Linux target framework (tgt) aims to simplify various SCSI target driver (iSCSI, Fibre Channel, SRP, etc) creation and maintenance. The key goals are the clean integration into the scsi-mid layer and implementing a great portion of tgt in user space.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Printing: A Curious Mix of Yuck and Excellence, part 1

  • What’s unique about openSUSE?
  • 50 Essential Open Source Security Tools
  • USB MiniMe 2008 install from Windows
  • Linux powered Yoggie goes open source
  • Does cb2bib remove drudgery from bibliography creation?
  • Level of Effort and Empowerment
  • 10 ways to amuse a geek
  • G1G1 coming to Europe Nov. 17
  • The license wars are over
  • Windows: The pit stop on the road to open source
  • Next generation C++ "goes beta"
  • IPFire, the Lean Linux firewall
  • Exploring VIM configurations

some howtos:

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  • Installing and Setting Up Avant Window Navigator

  • Ubuntu, the absolute beginners guide
  • Installing a vanilla Firefox in Kubuntu Intrepid
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part4
  • Relaying Postfix SMTP via
  • Ubuntu Ignored Ickthyopterix 8.10 Static IP Bug
  • A Secure Nagios Server
  • Convert Flac To Ogg Vorbis In Three (Easy) Steps
  • Ubuntu 10 things in a terminal
  • Ways To Grab Screenshots In Ubuntu

Specialty Linuxes to the rescue

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Linux Six sweet distributions that can boot from a pen drive, run in a sliver of RAM, rejuvenate an old system, or recover data from a dead PC.

File Roller is a piece of sh*t

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linuxd.wordpress: I never liked File Roller, and now I’ve got proof it sucks. Besides terrible usability, it handles partitioned rar files very badly. By partitioned I mean when a rar file is separated into .r00 .r01 etc parts, by very badly I mean it can’t handle it at all.

Open-source companies crashing en masse? Puh-lease!

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news.cnet: Remember Trip Chowdhry, the analyst with Global Equities Research? He's the guy who said that Red Hat is rubbish, and that the entire LAMP stack is potty, too. Given how far off Chowdhry was then, it's perhaps no surprise that he's now claiming that "'almost every VC funded open-source company is struggling and will run out of funds within the next six months."

LZMA compression becoming the better choice

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Software If you have not heard about it, certainly start reading up on it and DO use it. If your using bzip2 currently then your going to like this even more.

Opera UI feedback

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Software I'm currently working on a strategy on how to take the Opera User Interface forward, and I'm eager to get your opinions on a particular subject: Native look and feel.

Firefox 3.1 beta 2 delayed, beta 3 now sheduled

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blogs.zdnet: The Mozilla team had decided to delay beta 2 and release a beta 3 in order to resolve bugs and garner more feedback before the early 2009 ship.

Tiny hardware firewall opened to Linux hackers

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Hardware A vendor of miniature hardware firewalls has started shipping two user-modifiable products. Delivered with sandboxed cross-compiling development tools, and an open source Linux firewall stack, the Open Firewall SOHO and Pico give sysadmins, security pros, and hobbyists access to Yoggie's nifty hardware for the first time.

Novell offers RHEL, CentOS support

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SUSE Novell has launched a "competitive replacement" program aimed at luring Red Hat and CentOS users to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) product. Through the program, Novell will support customers' RHEL or CentOS servers for up to two years, while the customer migrates to SLES.

The big Windows 7 lie

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blogs.computerworld: You’ve read the early reviews with comments like Windows 7 is a big improvement over Vista and Windows 7 is wicked fast. Sounds great doesn’t it? On closer inspection though Windows 7 M3 (Milestone 3) is being revealed as being just a “slightly tweaked version of Vista.”

Also: Is Windows 7 Vista all over again?

The sad state of emerald for compiz & its possible demise

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Software Emerald is no longer maintained which means, unless someone really steps up it’ll just be a memory.

Ubuntu Experiences

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manishtech.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu for quite a long time and seen lots of its releases. Some of them were really groundbreaking in features. Many of them showed a new route for other distro developers. Indeed Ubuntu enjoys a strong community ahead of Fedora.

Slitaz to the rescue

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kmandla.wordpress: Most of my hardware questions about my FMV-5100 have been answered, thanks to Slitaz. A quick hop, skip and jump from an installation, and I had a booting, self-configuring Linux system in place on my newest family member.

First Trek film footage unveiled

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Movies Lost creator JJ Abrams has unveiled footage from his Star Trek prequel at a press event in London. The clips featured US actor Chris Pine as the young Captain Kirk, Heroes star Zachary Quinto as Mr Spock and Simon Pegg as Enterprise engineer Scotty.

Tips and tricks for working on the command line

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HowTos Anyone that has been reading these tips for any length of time knows that I am a command-line guy. It’s faster, more efficient, and more powerful. Sure, a nice GUI is great to look at, but to really get things done, give me the CLI any day.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Dropbox, FUD, CNCF, 'Cloud'

  • Dropbox has some genuinely great security reporting guidelines, but reserves the right to jail you if you disagree

    Dropbox's position, however reasonable in many of its aspects, is woefully deficient, because the company reserves the right to invoke DMCA 1201 and/or CFAA and other tools that give companies the power to choose who can say true things abour mistakes they've made.

    This is not normal. Before DRM in embedded software and cloud connectivity, became routine there were no restrictions on who could utter true words about defects in a product. [...]

  • Hackers Infect Linux Servers With Monero Miner via 5-Year-Old Vulnerability [Ed: A five-year-old vulnerability implies total neglect by sysadmins, not a GNU/Linux weakness]
    Attackers also modified the local cron jobs to trigger a "watchd0g" Bash script every three minutes, a script that checked to see if the Monero miner was still active and restarted XMRig's process whenever it was down.
  • GitHub: Our dependency scan has found four million security flaws in public repos [Ed: No, GitHub just ran a scan for old versions being used and reused. It cannot do this for proprietary software, but the issues are there and the risks are no better.]
    GitHub says its security scan for old vulnerabilities in JavaScript and Ruby libraries has turned up over four million bugs and sparked a major clean-up by project owners. The massive bug-find total was reached within a month of the initiative's launch in November, when GitHub began scanning for known vulnerabilities in certain popular open-source libraries and notifying project owners that they should be using an updated version.
  • Envoy CNCF Project Completes Security Audit, Delivers New Release
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) has begun a process of performing third-party security audits for its projects, with the first completed audit coming from the Envoy proxy project. The Envoy proxy project was created by ride-sharing company Lyft and officially joined the CNCF in September 2017. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale micro-services data traffic.
  • Hybrid cloud security: Emerging lessons [Ed: 'Cloud' and security do not belong in the same headline because 'cloud' is a data breach, typically involving a company giving all its (and customers') data to some spying giant abroad]

A Look At The Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux

The latest in our Windows versus Linux benchmarking is looking at the relative performance impact on both Linux and Windows of their Spectre and Meltdown mitigation techniques. This round of tests were done on Windows 10 Pro, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Clear Linux when having an up-to-date system on each OS where there is Spectre/Meltdown protection and then repeating the same benchmarks after reverting/disabling the security functionality. Read more

Raspberry Pi atmospheric sensor HAT can detect distant explosions

OSOP’s $179 and up “Raspberry Boom” Raspberry Pi HAT add-on detects infrasound from volcanoes, explosions, and rockets. A $299 and up Shake and Boom HAT adds a seismograph. Panama-based OSOP, which found Kickstarter success with its Raspberry Shake seismograph add-on board for the Raspberry Pi, has now returned with a Raspberry Boom add-on board and infrasound sensor that detects inaudible sound. The same Kickstarter campaign is also selling a new Raspberry Shake and Boom product that combines the Boom with the seismograph capabilities of the Shake. Both products can tap into OSOPs large citizen science network to detect real-time events around the world. Read more

Wireless crazed Orange Pi boasts 4G LTE, WiFi, BT, FM, and GPS

The “Orange Pi 4G-IOT” SBC that runs Android 6.0 on a quad -A53 MediaTek MT6737 SoC, and offers a 40-pin header, WiFi, Bluetooth, FM, GPS, a 4G LTE radio, and fingerprint sensor support. Shenzhen Xunlong open spec Orange Pi 4G-IOT SBC, which just launched for $45 on AliExpress, is the most wireless savvy Orange Pi to date. The open-spec SBC includes an unnamed, 4G LTE radio module with mini-SIM card slot, as well as a combo module that includes WiFi, Bluetooth, FM, and GPS. There is also support for a fingerprint sensor. Read more