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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story My Recent Linux Journey Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 3:01am
Story Which Linux Distribution Powers HP Helion Cloud? [VIDEO] Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 2:56am
Story A Process for Managing and Customizing HPC Operating Systems Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 2:49am
Story Breaking: Amazon launch $199 ‘Fire Phone’ with free Amazon cloud image storage Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 2:33am
Story Lighting automation system syncs bulbs with music Rianne Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 12:24am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2014 - 8:51pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2014 - 8:44pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/06/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Ubuntu 14.10 Now Using Linux Kernel 3.15, Version 3.16 to Follow Soon Rianne Schestowitz 18/06/2014 - 8:22pm

Kubuntu Hardy Heron KDE 4 Remix review

Filed under
KDE
Ubuntu

fosswire.com: The latest version of the KDE variant of Ubuntu, has two versions - the standard disc featuring KDE 3.5.9, and this KDE 4 Remix disc, which features the new KDE 4.0 release.

Choosing a font manager

Filed under
Software

linux.com: With libraries of thousands of fonts to handle, designers need a way to quickly locate fonts and organize them into meaningful categories -- such as by the project that requires them -- and to disable fonts when they are not in use so that they don't clog system memory. Although as recently as two years ago the GNU/Linux desktop lacked a font manager that met all these needs, it now has four that either meet them or are likely to.

KDE 4 rev 802150: Work in progress

Filed under
KDE

polishlinux: The state of Plasma can be currently described as ‘chaotic’. The reason for that is that its API is being refactored which in result makes it almost impossible to use for a regular human being. I managed to catch a dev snapshot of KDE 4.1 which allowed me to test the recent changes, at least on the surface.

interesting off-topics

Filed under
Misc
  • Blogger fined for 'menacing' rant

  • Electron discovered April 30, 1897, by Joseph John Thomson
  • Microsoft device helps police pluck evidence from cyberscene of crime

12 of the Best Media Players for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: One of the many perks of being a Linux user is that you have plenty of excellent software to choose from. To somehow guide those who are still looking for a media player that will suit their needs, I have put together a list that I hope will help.

Open source big names helping attract new users

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com: Participation by big open source vendors is helping attract new interest in Linux user groups in Asia. Khairil Yusof, president of the Free/Open Source Software Society (FOSS) in Malaysia, said in an interview that the group's members have benefited by sharing knowledge with others from different technology backgrounds during its monthly meetings.

Red Hat pitching proprietary lock-in as "open"

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: Ah, how the mighty have fallen. In what must have been gross oversight, Red Hat is pitching proprietary software on its website under the banner of "No vendor lock-in." The way Red Hat and IBM make it appear, simply running one's software on an open platform like Linux magically removes the proprietary lock-in of the application.

Firefox 3 improves handling of invalid SSL certificates

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.ivanristic.com: I have downloaded the beta of Firefox 3 to check out the improvements related to SSL. First, there's the added support for Extended Validation SSL certificates, but I am not very excited about that. It's a nice feature, but it's not going to bring much good overall. On the other hand, I am very happy with the improvements to the handling of invalid SSL certificates.

Also: Mozilla Developer News April 29

Reiser FS: The open source file system fallout

Filed under
Reiser

blogs.zdnet.com: Yesterday, the Open Source community took an emotional hit when veteran Linux programmer Hans Reiser was convicted of first degree murder in the suspicious disappearing of his wife, Nina. I would like to talk a little bit about how this verdict will impact the technology in play for file system dominance in our favorite Open Source operating system, Linux.

Also: Was Reiser really found Guilty of being a Hacker?

Sun sheds light on its open-source future

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

zdnet.co.uk: Sun UK's chief open-source officer, Simon Phipps, has a high-profile role to play as the company aims to complete its move to 100 percent open software development.

UVC support soon in vanilla kernel?

Filed under
Linux

liquidat.wordpress: In a recent interview with the German IT online magazine Golem.de the kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman mentioned that the USB video device support will soon be merged into the vanilla kernel.

Linux and Formula One

Filed under
Linux

itpro.co.uk: Formula One motor racing is no longer about famous car marques, its about precise science and using technology to shave another fraction of a second off a lap time, and Linux is playing a pivotal role in helping the race teams achieve this.

Announcing Linux Graphics Users.com

Filed under
Web

Linux Graphics Users.com is a forum created by artists, for artists in the Linux community. It is true, that most of the Linux graphics software listed on our site has their own forums (some more than one).... But, LGU is much more than just about the software, or the distro.... It's about the people.

BT bundles MS Office with Linux laptop

Filed under
Humor

reghardware.co.uk: This week's award for the Most Astutely Selected Software Bundle goes to BT after the teleco tried to hook potential purchasers of Asus' Linux-running Eee PC 900 by offering to ship it with a copy of Microsoft Office.

OpenOffice.org - a candidate for a 501(c)6?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.gnome.org/bolsh: Faced with serious, persistant maladministration and injustice in the ‘communities’ Sun controls - what can you do?

Chess in Linux

Filed under
Gaming

wheatlandlinux.wordpress: There are many (not all are very good) chess games in Linux. There is the one installed by default with the small game packages that come with Ubuntu and most versions of Linux that use Gnome, but I do not like this one very much. It is ok for basic play, but it is really not that good.

Collector’s item

Filed under
Software

manilastandardtoday.com: I have managed to amass several hundred audio CDs over the years—and I have long since given up trying to keep track of them on a spreadsheet. Entering data in this manner—especially individual track information—was simply too tedious. How best then to manage my music library?

“Don’t tell them that I love it”

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • “Don’t tell them that I love it”

  • Three Steps Forward, One Step Back
  • How To Enable BCM43xx in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Filezilla in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Repositories for Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron
  • rm -rf ubuntu && cat gentoo.iso > /dev/sda1
  • Some tasks to consider after upgrading to Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)
  • Hardy Heron moves into the Black Tower
  • Using update-alternatives to switch between Gnash and SWFdec in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Status of Sugar in Ubuntu 8.04
  • First Look: Ubuntu 8.04 'Hardy Heron'
  • Mozilla Prism in Ubuntu!
  • Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron has issues

The Perfect Desktop - Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Hardy Heron)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This document describes step by step how to set up a Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Hardy Heron) desktop. The result is a fast, secure and extendable system that provides all you need for daily work and entertainment.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux: Try Before You Buy

  • Linux gains lightweight media-oriented graphics stack
  • Update on merged openSUSE forums
  • Rocking the Pacific Northwest with Linux
  • Meizu M3: Linux compatible MP3/Ogg player
  • You'll Get Bitten Eventually...
  • OOo: Searching and replacing for carriage returns, tabs, and other characters, using regular expressions
  • New BBC site struggles with Firefox
  • Jonathan Schwartz has the last word on MySQL
  • Social networking for sports sits on an open platform
  • Windows or open source is not the question
  • Grabbing Telnet Information On Linux Using TcpDump
  • Linux experience everything that it should be
  • Phoronix Test Suite Mailing List
  • Interview With IBM's Inna Kuznetsova on Big Green Linux
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More in Tux Machines

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more

Server: Red Hat, Security, Samba, Docker, Microsoft Canonical and MongoDB