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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Sugar Labs is joining the GNOME Foundation

Filed under
OSS

gnome.org: Sugar Labs, a member of the Software Freedom Conservancy, is joining the GNOME Foundation as part of the GNOME Advisory Board.

KWin visual effects get way better in KDE 4.2

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: We were impressed with the big improvements in the first KDE 4.2 beta when it was released earlier this month. It fixed a lot of bugs and brought some impressive new features to the Plasma panel system and other areas of the desktop environment. The second beta, which was released last week, builds on that work and adds a lot of important refinements.

24 Hours with openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

bear454.blogspot: Back in June I blogged about my first experiences with openSUSE 11.0. Although there were some groundbreaking improvements, the general tenor of my experience was negative. I'm happy to say that both of my major gripes with 11.0 are completely resolved in 11.1, and then some.

GNU, Linux, and the Free Software Movement

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: In 1983, a computer programmer from MIT by the name of Richard M. Stallman grew skeptical of the commercial software packages that were selling for big bucks at computer stores. Since this software was a commercial product, its source code was often protected, and the alteration, or hacking, of the code was prohibited.

Hotrod Your Asus Laptop With 64-bit Kubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: I'm an old-school horsepower junkie. Oddly, I have the same addiction with laptop hardware. My four year old AMD 64-bit HP Pavilion laptop threw a rod (the LCD died) a couple of weeks ago, so this Asus seemed to fit the bill. Now on to the shop...I mean office, for a little 'tweaking' with Kubuntu.

Notifications, indicators and alerts

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: Let’s talk about notifications! As Ryan Lortie mentioned, there was a lot of discussion across the Ubuntu, Kubuntu, GNOME, KDE and Mozilla communities represented at UDS about the proposals Canonical’s user experience design and desktop experience engineering teams have made for Ubuntu 9.04.

Linux - the OS that keeps on giving

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: Most Linux users and supporters are well aware of the openness, collaboration and flexibility that mark the OS and its distributions, but we’ve received some more tangible gifts from the Linux community recently as we enjoy the holidays.

Linux Isn't Just Good Ideology -- It's Better Computing

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Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: There's no way around it: the longer you run a Windows installation, the slower and less responsive it gets. On my year-old dual-boot laptop, I wait longer and longer for Windows to boot, and longer and longer for programs to do what I ask.

OpenSUSE 11.1: Evolution dependent on Mono

Filed under
SUSE

itwire.com: Any .1 release of a Linux distribution is generally meant to fix bugs which were present in the .0 release, not to introduce new features. In this respect, OpenSUSE 11.1 differs sharply from other distributions. And the news is not all good either.

Also: My first taste of Mono on openSUSE 11.1

Best Linux releases of 2008

Filed under
Linux

mybroadband.co.za: The second half of 2008 proved to be an exciting time for Linux fans as most of the popular Linux distributions pushed out a pre-Christmas release. We take a look at a few that caught out attention.

Nix fixes dependency hell on all Linux distributions

Filed under
Software

linux.com: A next-generation package manager called Nix provides a simple distribution-independent method for deploying a binary or source package on different flavours of Linux, including Ubuntu, Debian, SUSE, Fedora, and Red Hat. Even better, Nix does not interfere with existing package managers.

Linux Lists

Filed under
Linux
  • 15 Tips to Improve your Linux Experience

  • The Top 11 Reasons To Give Linux For Christmas
  • 7 things making me tear my hair out after installing openSUSE 11.1

Phoronix's 2008 Linux Graphics Survey Results

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week our annual Linux Graphics Survey ended. There were over 14,000 submissions this year to the eleven questions we asked pertaining to X.Org, Linux desktop usage, and graphics hardware. In this article are all of the results from this year's survey.

Linux Magazine's Top 10 Articles of 2008

Filed under
OSS

linux-mag.com: Wrapping up our year in review, we’ve complied the best of Linux Magazine in 2008. Thanks to the writers, editors, and especially, the readers for making this an outstanding year.

An Easy Way to Introduce Inkscape Drawing Program to Youth and Adults

Filed under
Software

washingtonpost.com: Inkscape is a fun, free and very powerful vector drawing program that runs on all major computer platforms: Linux, Macintosh and Windows. This program can give you endless hours of enjoyment, even if you're not an artist.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 283

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Review: First look at openSUSE 11.1

  • News: openSUSE gets new license, Debian votes on firmware in "Lenny", Mandriva sets up community steering committee, Gentoo begins weekly snapshots, interviews with openSUSE and Gentoo developers
  • Released last week: openSUSE 11.1, Linux Mint 6
  • Upcoming releases: VectorLinux 6.0 RC1
  • New additions: ZevenOS
  • New distribution: CacheGuard, Rubuntu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

All window managers are not equal in screen redraw speed.

Filed under
Software

toolbox.com: I have been going through a stage of trying several different window managers and I found something that surprised me. The screen redraw speed of different window managers have a visual difference in screen redraw speed.

The Open Source Crystal Ball

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: The end of the year is a self-indulgent time, when those who write about technology stop making lists of the best, worst, and most mind-numbingly mediocre applications they find and pause to make lists about tech trends in the upcoming year.

I'm *Not* Linux

Filed under
Linux

Glyn Moody: One of the most powerful aspects of free software is that its entire approach and mindset is orthogonal to proprietary software. It's not just better, it's profoundly different. That's one of the most important reasons that *everything* Microsoft has thrown against free software has not just failed, but failed dismally.

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Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28
    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.
  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28
    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update. This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

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New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space. The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing. Read more