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Sunday, 25 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cinnamon 2.4.4 Arrives with Various Refinements Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 11:00pm
Story Android drone tracks you by computer vision Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:48pm
Story ArrayFire Accelerated Compute Library Open-Sourced Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Wormhole in Interstellar Movie Designed with a Linux OS – Gallery Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:13pm
Story Pear OS Linux Concept Revived as Pearl Linux 1.0 – Screenshot Tour Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:10pm
Story We have a winner! Fresh Linux Mint 17.1 – hands down the best Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:05pm
Story 6 tips for adopting open source Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:02pm
Story Linux admins: It's time to relearn the art of compiling apps Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 9:47pm
Story Dirt-cheap laptops might be this year's stocking stuffer Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 9:43pm
Story I GIve Up On Systemd Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 9:24pm

Windows XP takes on Linux in the netbook market

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

guardian.co.uk: Shen -- who is keen on Linux -- said Asus had hoped sales of Eee PCs would be 50:50 between XP and Linux, but actually they were 60:40 in XP's favour.

Does OpenOffice.org Still Matter?

Filed under
OOo

blogs.eweek: For the past six years or so, I've watched the suite progress slowly but steadily toward the goal of being "just as good" as Microsoft Office. For my needs, OpenOffice.org has been better than good enough. Given the rise of these Web-based alternatives it's worth asking whether OpenOffice.org will continue to matter as we move forward.

Missing features in Amarok 2

Filed under
Software

kde.org: Today on IRC a user asked the following question: "Is there a list of 1.4 features that are still missing in Amarok 2?" As this question comes up rather frequently, I will try to shed some light on this topic here.

In search of bigger, stronger calculators

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If I had had SpeedCrunch or Qalculate! during high school, finishing homework really would've been child's play. From breaking down complex algebraic equations, to solving your calculus problems, to performing geometric computations and providing statistical answers, SpeedCrunch and Qalculate! are tools that offer quick solutions to difficult questions.

Debian postpones Lenny, calls for help

Filed under
Linux

tectonic.co.za: Debian, the granddaddy of Linux distributions, is in trouble. Its planned September release date for Lenny - its latest release - has come and gone and there is still no sign of the new product. It seems the Debian team is battling “too many release critical bugs” to make Lenny viable. And now the team is calling for help from the community to squash the remainder of these bugs.

Andreas Jaeger: Retiring from the openSUSE Board

Filed under
SUSE

Andreas Jaeger: I have served as chairperson of the openSUSE board the last year and would like to announce that I decided to pass the honours on for the next election period.

Pentagon: Open source good to go

Filed under
OSS

gcn.com: Military IT folks wondering if their use of Apache, Perl, Linux and other open source software is copacetic with the brass will soon get some answers from the Defense Department's Office of the Chief Information Officer.

Going to a Linux or Open-Source Show?

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: Even before our recent economic crash, flying has become increasingly more costly. So have hotels, the price of gas, on and on it goes. Can you afford to go to a show? Can your company afford to send you to a show? The answer for most of us and our businesses is increasingly ‘no.’

Opera maverick is still making waves

Filed under
Software

theinquirer.net: TRIVIA QUIZ: Which browser was the first to implement tabs, integrated search, zoom, saved sessions, and runs on mobile phones and TVs? Hint: it wasn't Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome.

Red Hat tells Wall Street it wants Main Street

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Commercial Linux distributor Red Hat hosted its annual analyst day in New York today, and as Wall Street continues to hemorrhage, the company couldn't have picked a gloomier time for the occasion.

Hands on: How to get more from Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software

pcw.co.uk: Following the recent releases of two popular Linux distributions, Fedora 9 and Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, we are looking at a couple of additional pieces of software you might want to install onto a fresh installation of either.

Why Mono and Samba Are Patently Different

Filed under
Software

computerworlduk.com/blogs: To understand the principal difference between Samba and Mono, we need to explore what they do, and how they do it.

Open source in a time of recession

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: No one questions the fact of recession any more, although we have yet to confirm a single quarter without growth, let alone two. Tech hates recessions, even though tech booms start at the bottom of them. Just as open source itself emerged from the wreckage of the dot bomb during, what — the early aughts?

Sidux grows on you

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Sidux, a relatively new desktop Linux distribution, is based on Sid, the unstable developmental branch of Debian. The developers strive for an easy-to-install and easy-to-use modern Debian derivative, and pride themselves on remaining true to the principles and values of the Debian project. Despite a few inconveniences, I like Sidux a bit more each time I use it.

Puppy Linux Live Trumps LinuxDefender In More Ways Than One

Filed under
Linux

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: More than a few people wrote in to let me know about other interesting "live" distro's of Linux after our post on using LinuxDefender Live CD to Fix NTFS problems ran.

Debian Project News - October 8th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 12th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include: Bits from the DPL, What you can do for Lenny, and 500,000th bug reported.

10 questions to ask before migrating to Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: With the unsure economy and Microsoft Vista failing to gain overwhelming acceptance, many people are considering a migration to Linux. Although I find Linux to be far superior to Windows, certain criteria MUST be considered before making the switch.

Opera 9.60 released

Filed under
Software

Opera today released a new version of its desktop browser, Opera 9.60. Highlights include Feed preview, Speed enhancements, and Mail improvements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Torvalds talks about his brand new blog

  • Does Linux suck or is it lusers who suck? (netbook returns)
  • Biggest Enemy Of Linux Netbooks Isn't Windows - It's Expectations
  • Microsoft’s Cloud Computing: The Movie
  • Google is NOT your friend
  • New Linux Broadcom Wi-Fi drivers arrive
  • Quick Reviews: Linux, a n00b's POV
  • Opening Up ISO's Can of Worms
  • Wizbit: a Linux filesystem with distributed version control
  • How to Make a PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe Flash drive in Windows
  • Red Hat looks to mainstream markets for growth
  • Buddi - Personal budget software for Ubuntu Desktop
  • Open source does not mean 'open to pilfer trademarks,' suggests Google
  • NH Hoteles: Customers stay for less with open source
  • Open Source vs. Proprietary Intranet Software, Part 3
  • Ubuntu Podcast Episode#8
  • Mozilla Developer News 10/7
  • Red Hat To Adopt Qumranet Desktop Virtualization Products
  • Forget the damn netbooks. Can “Windows” replace Windows?

Linux distros lead jumps from Sun

theregister.co.uk: Sun Microsystems has lost a key individual responsible for getting its aspiring open-source software included in leading Linux distributions. Barton George has quit Sun after 13 years.

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More in Tux Machines

Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up. Read more

today's leftovers

  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux
    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.
  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  
  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market
    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017. Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.
  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October
    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers. And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center. While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.
  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes
    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers. What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs
    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.
  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History
    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.
  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data
    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future. The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?
  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?
    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers
    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.