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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nerd Likes And Dislikes srlinuxx 17/07/2011 - 8:06pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 17/07/2011 - 6:31am
Story A Weekend with Kongoni 2011 srlinuxx 17/07/2011 - 3:50am
Story The FSF about Free Games srlinuxx 17/07/2011 - 3:49am
Story Slackware Turns 18 srlinuxx 17/07/2011 - 3:47am
Story Canonical Hiring Consumer Marketing Expert srlinuxx 1 16/07/2011 - 11:53pm
Story How to best choose hardware for Linux srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 10:51pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 184 is out srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 10:45pm
Story At last, the Bird became the Thunderbird srlinuxx 1 16/07/2011 - 9:06pm
Story Debian 7 might come in a GNU Hurd version srlinuxx 1 16/07/2011 - 8:12pm

Book Review: Live Linux CDs

Filed under
Reviews

I can still remember the wow factor when first seeing a copy of Knoppix booting up on a Windows machine. These days Knoppix is no longer alone, there are plenty of other Linux live CDs available. For those who've ever wondered how it all works or have entertained ideas of creating their own live CDs then Christopher Negus has put together a book that opens the lid on the arcane secrets involved.

X.Org community releases X11R7.2

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Software

The X.Org community is proud to announce the release of X11R7.2, the third modular release of the X Window System. X11R7.2 supports Linux, BSD, Solaris, Microsoft Windows and GNU Hurd systems.

Professional audio with Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Linux

In the last few years Linux has made great strides forward in the provision of professional applications for the creation, manipulation, and recording of audio and music. It is now possible to create a professional level Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) using only Free Software.

Also: Book Review: Fedora Linux

Interview: Sam Leffler of the FreeBSD Foundation

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Interviews

During last weekend's Southern California Linux Expo 5x, Sam Leffler of the FreeBSD Project and FreeBSD Foundation and "old school" hacker from the UC Berkeley Computer Systems Research Group (where the original Berkeley Software Distribution was developed) took some time to explain to me what the Foundation actually does, and the kind of work it has fostered. We also chatted briefly about the current status of FreeBSD, and the degree to which Apple contributes to the Project.

To get SoundJuicer to rip CDs directly to MP3

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

SoundJuicer is the CD ripper of choice for Ubuntu, but it doesn't rip directly to MP3, nor does it give you the option to do so. To create that option...

IDC: Linux Ecosystem Worth $40 Billion by 2010

Filed under
Linux

Sizing the Linux market ecosystem is no easy task. Downloads of Linux operating systems and applications are not an accurate measure. Analyst firm IDC, however, has a handle on the market and its size, and it's large.

Book Review: Designing and Implementing Linux Firewalls and QoS using netfilter, iproute2, NAT, and L7-filter

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Reviews

As is reminiscent of many of the books written by authors for Packt Publishing, the first chapter begins with descriptions and re-introductions to many of the basic networking concepts. These include the OSI model, subnetting, supernetting, and a brief overview of the routing protocols. Chapter 2 discusses the need for network security and how it applies to each of the layers of the OSI model.

Linux Links and You - Symbolic (Soft) and Hard Links Explained

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HowTos

If you’ve used the command line in Linux at all, you’ve probably heard about links. Symbolic links, soft links, hard links, links, links, links. What the heck are these things anyway?

One million OLPC laptop orders confirmed

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OLPC

Quanta Computer, the world's largest contract laptop PC manufacturer, already has confirmed orders for one million notebook PCs for the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project, a company representative said Thursday.

Colonizing a free new world with FreeCol

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Gaming

Colonizing a new world is not a trivial task, even when you're doing it in a clone of a famous game. FreeCol is a free-as-in-free-software Java-based clone of Sid Meier's Colonization that's currently at the 0.5.3 release.

Zero Install: An executable critique of native package systems

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Linux

Zero Install is one of the more promising alternatives to native package systems for Linux distributions, such as RPM and Debian's dpkg. It begins with a criticism of existing package systems the difficulties of using them, and is built to provide an answer to the problems raised by the critique.

Microsoft, Novell Have Much to Prove

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SUSE

Microsoft and Novell have been making a big deal of their big deal to work together to soothe customers' cross-platform pain points. But it remains to be seen whether and how far the deal will end up extending beyond the realm of press releases and presentation slide decks.

EBS implements Novell SUSE Linux

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SUSE

In an effort to decrease IT costs and provide centralised management, EBS Building Society in Ireland has deployed Novell's SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) within the company's mainframe environment to host IBM's WebSphere applications. SUSE Linux Enterprise Server will support more than 1,000 users within EBS in 2007.

Add a “Refresh/Reload GUI” Button to your Gnome Panel

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HowTos

If you’re like me and you love customizing your Gnome system, you’ll know that during your customizations, you have to reload this and reload that for your new changes to take effect.

My sysadmin toolbox

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Software

My working day includes a variety of tasks, and most of them take place on the command line, because that approach enables me to do things in the most efficient way. But you can also waste a lot of time on the command line if you don't know what utilities will give you what you need quickly. Here's an introduction to the most important tools I use every day.

New Firefox cookie vulnerability, workaround

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Security

Security researcher/hacker, Michal Zalewski has released a report on a security vulnerability affecting Firefox 2.0.0.1 and possibly earlier versions. The vulnerability could allow a malicious web site to impersonate an authentic one and set a cookie on its behalf. Zalewski recommends this workaround:

Why CIOs Don't Care About Open Source

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OSS

I recently gave a presentation at CIO on ‘Making Your Organization Open Source-Ready’, one question, posed by CIO editor Chris Koch, really struck me: "Why," Chris asked, "are so many CIOs completely uninterested in open source?

Debian developers seek new leader

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Linux

Nominations for the unpaid position of Debian Project Leader (DPL) opened last week. The successful candidate will take over from current incumbent Anthony Towns in April.

Has open-source lost its halo?

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OSS

Is open-source still a grassroots social movement made up of idealistic underdogs trying to revolutionize an amoral industry? Or has it become a cloak used by IT vendors large and small to disguise ruthless and self-serving behavior? Some observers argue it’s the latter.

Rhapsody: A Music Service for Linux Users

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Software

The idea of Rhapsody offering a Linux music service is fantastic, except for the fact that they have opted not to allow the full functionality offered to those in the Windows world. It really is a let down for Linux users, but is this something that we can blame Rhapsody for?

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box