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Sunday, 22 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:48pm
Story [Pictures] Samsung Z (SM-Z910F) Tizen in Gold Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Chromecast Now Lets Users Move Android Content to Their TVs Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Faults in Linux 2.6 Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:07pm
Story KDecoration2 – The road ahead Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Kerala Legislature moves to open source software; LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:09pm
Story Could we See a Linux Tablet Brought to Life with Ubuntu Touch? Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 7:47pm
Story Docker networking: How Linux containers will change your network Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 7:43pm

Compiz 0.7.6 Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Just shy of two months since Compiz 0.7.4 was released, Compiz 0.7.6 is now available. This update has a rewritten Place plug-in to dramatically improve multi-output behavior, configurable multi-output behavior, removed plane plug-in in favor of the wall plug-in, removed cube wallpaper painting in favor of the Compiz Fusion wallpaper plug-in, panel and desktop selection mode is now available in the switcher plug-in, and improved painting behavior.

PCMan Lightweight Alternative File Manager

Filed under
Software

tombuntu.com: PCMan File Manager (or PCManFM) is a lightweight alternative to GNOME’s Nautilus file manager or Konqueror/Dolphin in KDE. I found it to be an excellent option for more sophisticated GNOME users, as well as those with slower computers.

Slitaz Linux 20080518: Pretty, but not very useful

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Slitaz is one of an increasing number of distributions that came to me out of the blue via a random suggestion. These are quickly becoming my favorites because very often I'm pleasantly surprised by them. At just about 25 megabytes, Slitaz qualifies for the "ultra-lightweight" division.

Will we Ever Have a GPL Test Case?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The GNU General Public License is nearly 20 years old (version 1 came out in 1989). In that time there have been at least 100 million lawsuits filed in the US (and that's a conservative estimate). Amazingly enough, not one of those millions of court cases has actually tested the GPL's validity. How can that be - and is it a problem for the open source software movement?

Fedora Nightlife Project Harnesses Idle Computer Power

ostatic.com: Nightlife will give people the ability "to donate idle capacity from their own computers to an open, general-purpose Fedora-run grid for processing socially beneficial work and scientific research that requires access to large amounts of computing power.

Firefox takes aims at wrong record

Filed under
Moz/FF

daniweb.com/blogs: Now I am not averse to a little innovative marketing, and let's face it Mozilla and Firefox certainly know how to milk the hyperbole cow, but I cannot help but wonder if downloads in a day is the record they ought to be aiming at.

Review: Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring

Filed under
MDV

linux.com: Last month Mandriva announced its latest Spring edition. Despite a few minor glitches, after several weeks of testing the two Mandriva flavors, I have finally come across a distro that gives you the best of the GNU/Linux and proprietary worlds in terms of ease of use, range of software, and stability.

Gnome "2.24 Maybe" Apps

Filed under
Software

ibeentoubuntu.com: Right now, there are three applications proposed for the Gnome desktop which are not out of the running, but definitely aren't near crossing the finish line.

Browser faceoff: IE vs Firefox vs Opera vs Safari

Filed under
Software

zdnet.com.au: Web 2.0, with its complex sites and rich Ajax applications, is an increasingly demanding platform for a browser. In this review feature, we look at how the leading browsers measure up.

Linux filesystem defragmentation flame war

Filed under
Misc

ducea.com: Earlier this week I’ve read this article: “Defragmentation of Linux Filesystems“. The title and the headline made me interested enough, to go ahead and read it and see if there was something there to show me that linux filesystems do need defragmentation. The result was that I was not convinced at all. Still the reason for this post is not a technical one, but a human one.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • A Review of Open Office 3.0 Beta

  • Open Source Forum Shootout - bbPress
  • Three sitemap generators for WordPress
  • Trying out Linux the really easy way: VMware Player
  • Alt OS: running OpenSolaris, Syllable, and Haiku on the Eee
  • NASA taking open source into space
  • Ray Ozzie is afraid of open source, but why?
  • Get acquainted with open source analyst Raven Zachary (video)
  • Universities Embrace Open Source IT Monitoring
  • More efficient Ubuntu membership approval process
  • KDE at LinuxTag 2008 - Day 1
  • Hospital dumps Microsoft Exchange for Linux-based clone
  • The sum of Microsoft’s fears
  • Setting up Gentoo
  • Mandriva Linux Community Newsletter #128

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers with Linux 2.6.25

  • Test KDE 4.1 Beta 1 with KDE4Daily
  • Ubuntu: Enabling Broadcom BCM43xx Based Wireless
  • Got Java plugin working under Ubuntu 8.04
  • Display a calendar in UNIX
  • Recovering Ubuntu after installing Windows
  • Simple Shell One-Liner To Enumerate File Types In Linux and Unix

2008 Fav Desktop

KDE
46% (698 votes)
GNOME
39% (588 votes)
XFCE
6% (87 votes)
Enlightenment
3% (43 votes)
*box
4% (53 votes)
other
2% (33 votes)
Total votes: 1502

Forget the Heron; what's new in Ubuntu's Intrepid Ibex?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu, arguably the most popular Linux distribution today, came out with its 8.04 release last month, dubbed Hardy Heron. That's passé now; here’s the low down on what the future holds this October with Ubuntu 8.10, Intrepid Ibex.

The Shuttleworth Foundation Supports South Africa's Appeal Against OOXML

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: The Shuttleworth Foundation has sent out a press relase explaining what it believes is wrong with OOXML as a standard, and stating its conviction that the the South Africa Bureau of Standards has a strong case for appeal.

KDE 4.1: Have it Our Way

Filed under
KDE

practical-tech.com: Over the years, I’ve grown quite fond of KDE for my Linux desktops. To me, it offered the right combination of ease of use and access to Linux’s power-user resources. Now, though, one of the forthcoming changes in KDE 5.1 is already annoying me and it’s barely in beta.

GNOME 2.22.2 Released

Filed under
Software

This is the second update to GNOME 2.22. Come and see all the bug fixing,
all the new translations and all the updated documentation brought to
you by the wonderful team of GNOME contributors! A lot of work has been
done in the stable branch to make it even more solid than it was.

Low-cost Linux laptop targets British schools

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Elonex is taking orders for a sub-$200 Linux-based laptop aimed at the British educational market. Based on a 300MHz processor, likely ARM-based, the Elonex One includes WiFi, Ethernet, Flash storage, USB, and a 7-inch, 800 x 480 detachable touch display.

Banshee learns to sing

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: We've always been fond of Amarok. We recently discovered a contender to the title of most loved Linux media player, the ominously named Banshee. Fortunately, Banshee doesn't involve listening to shrieking demons, unless that's your genre of choice.

Amarok 2 Gets Music Video Support

Filed under
Software

kde.org: over the last few days I've been working on a video applet for Amarok 2, allowing you to view music videos directly in Amarok's new context view.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Canada’s Spy Agency Releases its Cyber-Defense Tool for Public
  • Canadian govt spooks open source anti-malware analytics tool
    The Communications Security Establishment (CSE) said the AssemblyLine tool is designed to analyse large volumes of files, and can automatically rebalance workloads.
  • Microservices served on blockchain, in open source
    Cloud application marketplace company Wireline is working with open source blockchain project developer Qtum The new union is intended to provide a conduit to consuming microservices at [web] scale using blockchain at the core. As we know, microservices offer the ability to create Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) without having to manage the underlying hardware and software infrastructure. [...] The Qtum a blockchain application platform combines the functions of Bitcoin Core, an account abstraction layer allowing for multiple virtual machines and a proof-of-stake consensus protocol aimed at tackling industry-use cases. The Qtum Foundation, headquartered in Singapore, is the decision-making body that drives the project’s development.
  • Rendering HTML5 video in Servo with GStreamer
    At the Web Engines Hackfest in A Coruña at the beginning of October 2017, I was working on adding some proof-of-concept code to Servo to render HTML5 videos with GStreamer. For the impatient, the results can be seen in this video here
  • Working Intel CET Bits Now Land In GCC8
    A few days back I wrote about Intel's work on Control-flow Enforcement Technology beginning to land in GCC. This "CET" work for future Intel CPUs has now landed in full for GCC 8. The bits wiring up this control-flow instrumentation and enforcement support are now all present in mainline GCC SVN/Git for next year's GCC 8.1 release.
  • Using Gitea and/or Github to host blog comments
    After having moved from FSFE’s wordpress instance I thought long about whether I still want to have comments on the new blog. And how I would be able to do it with a statically generated site. I think I have found/created a pretty good solution that I document below.

Security Leftovers

  • Where Did That Software Come From?
    The article explores how cryptography, especially hashing and code signing, can be use to establish the source and integrity. It examines how source code control systems and automated build systems are a key part of the software provenance story. (Provenance means “a record of ownership of a work of art or an antique, used as a guide to authenticity or quality.” It is increasingly being applied to software.)
  • Judge: MalwareTech is no longer under curfew, GPS monitoring [Updated]
    A judge in Milwaukee has modified the pre-trial release conditions of Marcus Hutchins, also known online as "MalwareTech," who was indicted two months ago on federal criminal charges. Under US Magistrate Judge William Duffin’s Thursday order, Hutchins, who is currently living in Los Angeles, will no longer be subject to a curfew or to GPS monitoring.
  • [Older] Leicester teen tries to hack CIA and FBI chiefs' computers
    A teenager attempted to hack senior US government officials' computers from his home. Kane Gamble, 18, from Coalville, Leicestershire, pleaded guilty to 10 charges relating to computer hacking. His targets included the then CIA director John Brennan and former FBI deputy director Mark Giuliano.

Debian: pk4, Freexian and More

Kernel and Graphics: ZenStates, AMDGPU, RADV, Vulkan, NVIDIA

  • ZenStates Allows Adjusting Zen P-States, Other Tweaking Under Linux
    ZenStates is an independent effort to offer P-States-based overclocking from the Linux desktop of AMD Ryzen processors and other tuning. ZenStates-Linux is an open-source Python script inspired by some available Windows programs for offering Ryzen/Zen CPU overclocking from the desktop by manipulating the performance states of the processor.
  • AMDGPU DC Gets A Final Batch Of Changes Before Linux 4.15
    The AMDGPU DC display code has a final batch of feature updates that were sent in this weekend for DRM-Next staging and is the last set besides fixes for the "DC" code for the 4.15 target.
  • Valve Developer Lands VK_EXT_global_priority For RADV Vulkan Driver
  • Vulkan 1.0.64 Adds In Another AMD-Developed Extension
    Vulkan 1.0.64 is out this weekend as the newest specification refinement to this high-performance graphics/compute API. As usual, most of the changes for this minor Vulkan revision are just documentation clarifications and corrections. This week's update brings just under a dozen fixes.
  • NVIDIA TX2 / Tegra186 Display Support Isn't Ready For Linux 4.15
    While the Jetson TX2 has been out since this past March and it's a phenomenal ARM development board, sadly the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver support for it still isn't ready with the mainline Linux kernel. Thierry Reding of NVIDIA sent in the Tegra DRM driver changes for DRM-Next that in turn is staged for Linux 4.15. Reding commented that there is prepatory work for the TX2 (Tegra186) but it's not all ready for upstream yet.