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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 26 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Sabayon is So Pretty and Fast srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 7:08pm
Story 32bit Vs 64bit. The War Continues srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 7:06pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 3:16pm
Story Fedora 17 "Beefy Miracle" Is Officially Dead srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 5:38am
Story New KDE Media Center Inches Closer srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 5:07am
Story Google Drive in LibreOffice srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 3:05am
Story Docker: A 'Shipping Container' for Linux Code srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 3:02am
Story The End of a Year of Open Source srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 2:58am
Story Is Linux Operating System Virus Free? srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 12:51am
Story Why Mark Shuttleworth Is Important to Desktop Linux srlinuxx 02/08/2013 - 12:49am

Will open source become as bloated and decrepit as proprietary software?

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: Jesse Robbins over on the O'Reilly Radar offers up a sobering reminder to those of us who feel that we are disrupting the software industry for the better: we may well end up becoming that which we disrupt.

Also: Trust in open source software soars
And: Open source tells content owners adapt or die

Cult of the Mad Penguin

Filed under
Linux

Linux Journal: Last Wednesday, I went to a pub with some people from work. I wore a t-shirt I picked up at Linux World Boston in 2003. As my co-workers left one by one, I moved to the bar to strike up a conversation with the bartender. "Hi!", the guy said. "I see you're wearing a Linux shirt."

Ubuntu wins 2007 Linux and Enterprise Open Source Readers' Choice Awards

Filed under
OSS

sys-con.com: SYS-CON's Readers' Choice Awards program, widely considered to be the most prestigious award program in the software industry, is a community-driven process in which the products participating in the program are nominated by the industry's vendors, customers, and users, as well as by the readers of SYS-CON Media's industry-leading i-technology publications.

OpenSUSE 10.3 Release Party at the OSTC at Novell

Filed under
SUSE

suserants: We are having an OpenSUSE 10.3 RELEASE PARTY on the Novell campus. It will be in the Open Source Technology Center (building A) on Thursday at 6:00 PM. Alrighty, you have been tasked with spreading the word and bringing all your friends.

Novell punts world's most expensive Linux distro

Filed under
SUSE

the register: One of the favourite public refrains of the FOSS movement is that Windows is too expensive, and that Microsoft swindles consumers, governments, taxpayers, penguins, and orphans.

Networking 2.6.24 Merge Plans

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I'm a bit behind after investigating the TCP performance issues that turned out to be HW specific problems. It's a bit of a disappointment, I thought maybe there was a cool bug to fix in TCP :-)" explained David Miller, posting his networking merge plans for the upcoming 2.6.24 kernel.

Why Should You Use Linux?

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: It's a question that most people wouldn't give a second thought to. And why should they? It's a completely different operating system that we see advertising for, that we see installed on every computer at major stores and that we find compatible software for in those same stores.

Michael Meeks on Sun and OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OOo

o'reilly onlamp: Michael Meeks hacks on OpenOffice.org (and other code) for Novell. While very few people question Sun’s generosity in purchasing Star Office and subsequently opening the code, there have been persistent questions regarding the community management of the project.

Opera Tips & Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

cybernet: Opera is an extremely customizable browser, but it does so much that it can be difficult to remember it all. Then again you would have to know what it does in order to remember it. Smile Today we want to walk you through a dozen tips and tricks that will inch you closer to becoming an Opera grand master.

Announcing the KDE 4.0 Release Event

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: On January 17-19, the KDE community will present KDE 4.0 with a Release Event at the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California. The purpose of this event is to celebrate the anticipated release of KDE's new desktop environment.

Is Ubuntu losing its crown to PCLinuxOS?

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

tectonic: Quick. Name the most popular Linux distribution. You probably guessed Ubuntu, Suse or Mandriva ... but what then? Which other Linux distributions are likely to make a top ten list?

Dell Ubuntu Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

laptopadvisor.blogspot: Dell as a pioneer in the industry has recently released first line of consumer desktop computers and notebooks with pre-installed Linux, Ubuntu 7.04. Dell Ubuntu has lots offer, Ubuntu is extremely powerful, practical, absolutely free, and ready-to-run desktop Linux distribution, which is highly compatible for mainstream use.

A script to tell which workstations are using Samba shares

Filed under
Software

linux.com: A combination of Linux utilities can help you determine who on your network is using which of your shared filesystems at any given time, allowing you to ask those users to log off while you update the system.

Tales from responsivenessland: why Linux feels slow, and how to fix that

Filed under
HowTos

Rudd-O: Desktop performance on Linux computers has been a hot-button issue of late, and a source of longstanding fights among the Linux developers. Today, I want to show you how I boosted (and you can boost) desktop performance dramatically.

Hardware Compatibility Ratings

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Frederic Lepied announced the hardware4linux.info website on the Linux Kernel mailing list, "the site is collecting hardware compatibilities and incompatibilities with Linux distributions in a collaborative way: users run a hardware collector program, upload the resulting file and then rate and comment how their hardware works."

Puppy Linux 3.0 - Small with a big bite

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Looking for a small, fast Linux distribution? Take a look at Puppy Linux. Version 3.0 of this lightweight Linux operating system was released yesterday.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Why choose proprietary software over open source? Survey says!

  • A Dog Barks, The Wind Blows, A Server Reboots…
  • Book Review: The Official Damn Small Linux Book
  • Red Hat Certified Challenge: History of open source
  • Flush your Postfix queue
  • Open source entrepreneur turns his hobby into an Inc. 500 enterprise
  • Linux Done Right (personals edition): Linux shop seeks Linux vendor
  • Rolling Releases
  • When a user logs in what files are updated in UNIX / Linux
  • Tomorrow openSUSE 10.3 is released - Everything about the 3D effects
  • eBay: Botnets are Linux-happy
  • Levanta freshens up Linux server cure-all

Upgrading an operating system is easy

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: Yesterday I decided to take the ultimate test of my badly mangled edgy Linux installation. Instead of the tried and true reformat and reload method I wanted to try the distribution upgrade that the automatic update kept on nagging me about. So jumping off of the deep end to see if I would sink or swim.

Why HP Still Believes In Unix

Filed under
OS

internetnews.com: A decade ago, Intel was shipping the Pentium II processor and Linux was a fringe operating system used by a few Internet fanatics. No one at the time would ever have thought the two in combination would be a match for Sun's SPARC/Solaris combination, HP's PA-RISC/HP-UX, IBM's POWER/AIX or SGI's MIPS/IRIX. Funny what a decade can do.

TOMOYO Linux

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "'TOMOYO Linux' is our work in the field of security enhanced Linux," Kentaro Takeda began, describing 15 patches posted to the Linux Kernel mailing list. He noted that in an earlier version of the patches posted just prior to the recent Kernel summit, TOMOYO Linux's Mandatory Access Control was limited to files.

Also: Using sched_yield (Im)properly
And: Kernel space: A tiny Linux for the embedded world

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more