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Saturday, 30 Apr 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Open-PC starts not with one or two but with three models and partners srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 3:01pm
Story Cut and Play With Pitivi Video Editor srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 2:59pm
Story The 6 dimensions of Open Source srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 1:05pm
Story The Slacker’s Fav Linux List srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 1:03pm
Story Where does Linux want to go these days? srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 1:01pm
Story The End of Novell srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 12:59pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 6:28am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 5:14am
Story Debian and Ubuntu – collaboration and issues srlinuxx 03/12/2010 - 5:07am
Story What's up with Fedora Installer Warning srlinuxx 02/12/2010 - 10:36pm

Intel 2006-08-09 Graphics Preview

Filed under
Reviews

Making news this afternoon is the release of Intel's next-generation graphics driver. This Linux display driver is open-source and supports all of the integrated graphics adapters from the i810 to the new i965 Express. As we were only alerted to these happening shortly in advance, we only have a few thoughts to share at this time.

Tip of the Trade: Knockd

Filed under
HowTos

Port-knocking has long been kicked around as a nearly fool-proof tactic for keeping intruders out of the network, while unfailingly allowing only legitimate connections. It works like this: The "secret knock" daemon listens on a network interface for a specific sequence of "knocks," or port hits. The client "knocks" by sending TCP or UDP packets to certain ports on the server. You don't need to leave any ports open for this work, because the daemon listens at the link-layer level. When the "secret knock" daemon detects the correct sequence of port hits, opens a port, and allows incoming traffic.

Managing users in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

As you notice from day to day use of Ubuntu, most tasks are easily accomplished. But what happens when you’re ready to expand your use of Ubuntu to include new applications, or connect to a home network and add new users?

Transgaming discusses problems (for Cedega) with ATI face to face

Filed under
Gaming

It seems as though Transgaming might have an ace up their sleeves to keep existing Transgamers and maybe even win back some. Quotes from the Transgaming Newsletter and development report:

Printing Avery labels with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

To aid users in the task of label printing, Avery Dennison offers a host of free (to download) software, including a program for the Mac released late last month. Linux still isn't supported, but that's no matter -- there's more than one open source application for Linux that lets you format text for printing on the whole universe of Avery labels, from DVD covers to business cards. Here's a look at them.

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Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

Filed under
OSS

Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

OSDL Signs Up Xandros To Accelerate Adoption Of Desktop Linux

Filed under
OSS

Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and Xandros, provider of easy-to-use Linux alternatives to Windows desktop and server products, announced that Xandros is joining the Labs to help drive the adoption of desktop Linux.

Portable Linux Pact Quietly Fades Away, Leaving Questions

Filed under
Linux

More than two years after touting a deal to create a version of Linux for phones and other handheld gadgets, Wind River Systems and Red Hat are parting ways.

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Giant Robots And Killer Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Maybe I should have titled this Why you should fear proprietary software. I generally leave pointing people to other stories to . . . er, um, well, other people. These stories, however, highlight so beautifully why open source software, open protocols, and open data formats are so important.

LinuxWorld Analysts Cite Hottest Open Source Trends

Filed under
Linux

What are some of the hottest trends in the Linux/open source market today? Avid activity among some resellers, abundant virtualization, and a growing tendency to mixed open source/proprietary deployments, according to a trio of top industry analysts, who helped to preview LinuxWorld San Francisco in an IDG-sponsored teleconference on Tuesday.

Also: Analysts: What to Look For at LinuxWorld

MythTV and AM2 on Linux war stories, a continuing saga

Filed under
Software

As you may recall from my last entry, I exchanged my cable box from a Scientific Atlanta 8000HD to a Scientific Atlanta 8300HD. The latter, new box continues to output a signal from the cable connection even if I have it in HDTV mode. It probably also continues to output AVI and S-Video. This finally opened up a way for me to use my cable box with a MythTV box.

The new platform maze

Filed under
Hardware

I own an old, quite customised Thinkpad a21m laptop, which I still use intensively when I’m out of town: with 256 Mb of RAM, a 750 MHz Pentium 3 chip and a 1024x768 screen running off an ATI chip, I can run pretty much all recent GNU/Linux distros around. I also have built a nice living-room warmer based off an Athlon64 X2 3800+ with a big, fat hard disk and more RAM than you can shake a stick at (well, almost). Is there a problem here?

Unix or Linux commands for changing user rights

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I received the question via email — “…How do I change user rights under UNIX? I am using Red Hat Enterprise Linux and my background includes Windows network…”

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Ubuntu Linux On Thinkpad T43p: Wow!

Filed under
Ubuntu

After reading report after report of people using Ubuntu Linux on various flavors of desktop and laptop computers, I've finally decided to give it a try.

Emacs tips: Customize your Emacs experience

Filed under
HowTos

One of the principal advantages of Emacs over competing editors is how flexible and customizable it is. In fact, in several other "Emacs tips" columns, you may find references to customizing your setup. It's a big topic, so this is a quick start guide to the fundamentals: the .emacs file and basic customization techniques.

rPath Named as Finalist for LinuxWorld San Francisco 2006 Product Excellence Awards

Filed under
Linux

rPath’s solutions named as finalists in three categories – Best Open Source Solution, Best Utility Grid Computing Solution and Best Virtualization Solution

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dear Init Freedom Lovers, once again the Veteran Unix Admins salute you. As promised two years ago with the first declaration of Exodus from Debian, today we can proudly state: we do not go gentle into that good night. Now has come the time to announce the Beta release of Devuan. Debian GNU+Linux is a fork of Debian without systemd, on its way to become much more than that. This Beta release marks an important milestone towards the sustainability and the continuation of Devuan as an universal base distribution. Read more Also: Beta Released Of Devuan, The Systemd-Free Version Of Debian

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