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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:23am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:22am
Story Kids Are Learning to Code With a Slice of Raspberry Pi Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:09am
Story Need a Cheap Chromebook? Here’s How to Pick One Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 9:04am
Story Raspberry Pi was created to solve talent crisis at Cambridge: Eben Upton [Interview] Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:53am
Story We interview Michael Hall, Ubuntu app development liason Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:53am
Story Choose your Look and Feel experience Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:49am
Story As DBMS wars continue, PostgreSQL shows most momentum Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:31am
Story Sharp to launch thinnest and lowest-bezel smartphone ever Rianne Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:26am
Story 18F publishes guidelines for open source contribution Roy Schestowitz 19/08/2014 - 8:20am

4 Little Known Thunderbird Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux-blog.org: I recently searched through the mozilla thunderbird extensions website and found 4 extensions that I didn't know about that actually prove to be quite useful. I use Thunderbird 2.0.0.12 on Foresight Linux and have tested all of these extensions and verified that they work on that environment.

7 young GNOME apps from a new generation

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org/bolsh: With the recent discussion in blogs around the GNOME world, it can be easy to forget that there have been some great new applications for GNOME appearing recently. Many of these are written by a new breed of GNOME developer.

Will the internet really improve the way we think?

Filed under
Linux

In a recent interview with the British Sunday Observer, Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, claimed that “it’s the next billion [internet users] who will change the way we think”. Such a big claim deserves some critical house room. Will the internet really change the way we think? Or are we just getting carried away?

Kubuntu 8.04: Hello Old Friend

Filed under
Ubuntu

raiden.net: Have you ever run into an old friend, whom you've not seen in a long time? I experienced this recently with a Kubuntu install. You see, I used to be a heavy KDE user and really loved using it. I took the time to look at a few other distributions before deciding to give Kubuntu a shot.

Ubuntu Linux not for ! Puppy Linux Rocks.

Filed under
Linux

blog.creativewebsaz: So a friend gave me her old computer and says ‘ I can’t use it, it has a virus or something’. Turns out it didn’t have a virus it had a huge problem with the hardrive. Of course with all the buzz I immediately went to Ubuntu. It was a wrong decision.

20 Reasons Linux Users Like Linux (and you might, too)

Filed under
Linux

suseblog.com: One of the major inhibitors to the spreading of Linux, as I see it, is that people don’t know why they should try it. Other reasons may include lack of support for their favorite game, or that Photoshop doesn’t run on Linux. For those of us who weren’t stopped by those reasons, why did we switch? What is it about Linux that makes it a viable alternative?

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

Filed under
MDV
SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

24 hours with openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bear454.blogspot: 24 hours. Not 'a day'; not figuratively; I've spent 24 hours with the recently released update to my long-running favorite OS. OpenSUSE Linux 11.0 is revolutionary, but my enthusiasm is tempered by substantial regressions.

Also: OpenSUSE 11.0 on a Lenovo ThinkPad T61

few early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Firefox 3 Tips & Tricks

  • Quick documents from the desktop
  • How to personalize a package’s CFLAGS in Gentoo
  • Resolve Windows (Netbios) Hostname in Ubuntu
  • Simple Perl Script To Ease Console Server Use On Linux And Unix
  • How to install Mplayer codecs in openSUSE 11-x86_64

Kernel space: drivers that don't make the kernel scene

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Linux supports most hardware "out of the box" without adding a driver. Most of the missing drivers are proprietary, from uncooperative manufacturers, but there are a few where the license is right but the actual code is still missing. Why?

Another Programming Language for Kids, but This One Is Impressive

Filed under
Software

codingexperiments.com: I just spent today spending my time with an interesting little app, Scratch. It’s a cool little application that introduces children and early teens to programming and animation.

My Newfound Love for Xfce!

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blogs: For the past week to two weeks I’ve done something I had’t done in years - I switched my default desktop environment in my GDM login screen. I’ve been logging into Xfce instead of my usual Gnome. There are basically three reasons why I’m loving Xfce over Gnome.

Interview with Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

oneopensource.it: Zenwalk is one of the most promising Linux distribution. Based on Slackware, the distro is lightweight, simple and stable. We decided to make some questions to Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator, regarding future plans and developments about this “GNU-Linux Operating System”.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Lessons of the Linux revolution

  • VirtualBox B0rken By Gutsy Kernel Upgrade
  • OpenLX and KalCulate pair Linux distro with proprietary accounting app
  • Report: Open Source City in Liverpool
  • Jim Zemlin: Nokia Launches a Full Scale War for the Mobile OS
  • Kiss VMWare's rump good-bye
  • Linux vs. Closed-Source Kernel Modules
  • Firefox: checking for updates?
  • Mozilla Developer News June 24
  • Vi Assistant
  • Open source tour of Europe: The Netherlands
  • Mandriva: Compatibility & Drivers I
  • Europcar buys into Red Hat's allegedly nonexistent desktop
  • Open Source vs. Profit: Google Android (iPhone 3G), Linux (Microsoft Vista)
  • A low-cost education-use mobile computer 'LUKID'
  • Gdium, another Eee PC competitor
  • LOLspeak creeping into code

openSUSE 11.0 x86_64 Review

Filed under
SUSE

dtschmitz.com: I have finished setting up openSUSE 11.0 on my HP dv2000z AMD Turion64 X2. Up to version 10.3 I was running the 32-bit version of SUSE and decided now was a good time to do a 'New' install and give x86_64 a spin.

I Did It - Ubuntu Linux on my Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

browncoatcat.wordpress: The great thing about Linux, all the distributions, not just Ubuntu is that people share what they have learnt, and it is always possible to find help with a problem. So in this spirit of sharing, here is how I got my new laptop to work with Ubuntu Linux.

Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cnet.com.au: The Acer Aspire One is better than most netbooks. It's fantastic for anyone who wants a small, cheap machine on which to type and surf the Web. However, its battery life lets it down slightly.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Chroot users with OpenSSH: An easier way to confine users to their home directories

  • Booting of a Live CD without a CD or an Emulator
  • Adding XFS Support to RHEL5
  • How to scan and OCR like a pro with open source tools
  • Linux And Unix System Security Wrap-Up - Part 4b
  • Vi Search and Replace
  • Ubuntu Hardy: How To Disable Synaptics Touchpad When Typing
  • Monitoring network performance with speedometer
  • Development with Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM)
  • Quickzi: How To Add a Line into the middle of a Text File
  • Making Music (Beats) on Linux/Ubuntu with Hydrogen

Arch Linux 2008.06

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: It’s taken some time, but here it is, the spankin new, fresh from the press Arch release, ambitiously called “Overlord”. In this review, I’ll have a look at it, and discuss a bit of the Arch philosophy in general.

Coders now can try mobile Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

cnet.com: Canonical on Tuesday released its first publicly available developer edition of Ubuntu for mobile Internet devices. Ubuntu MID works on two devices at present, the Samsung Q1U and the Intel Crown Beach.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5
    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.
  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28
    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.
  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse
    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!
  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0
    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people. Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.
  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC
    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project. Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.
  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room
    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.
  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code
    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing. Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017. In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”
  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang
    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack. Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.
  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem
     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

Kernel: Linux 4.15 and Intel

  • The Big Changes So Far For The Linux 4.15 Kernel - Half Million New Lines Of Code So Far
    We are now through week one of two for the merge window of the Linux 4.15 kernel. If you are behind on your Phoronix reading with the many feature recaps provided this week of the different pull requests, here's a quick recap of the changes so far to be found with Linux 4.15:
  • Intel 2017Q3 Graphics Stack Recipe Released
    Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has put out their quarterly Linux graphics driver stack upgrade in what they are calling the latest recipe. As is the case with the open-source graphics drivers just being one centralized, universal component to be easily installed everywhere, their graphics stack recipe is just the picked versions of all the source components making up their driver.
  • Intel Ironlake Receives Patches For RC6 Power Savings
    Intel Ironlake "Gen 5" graphics have been around for seven years now since being found in Clarkdale and Arrandale processors while finally now the patches are all worked out for enabling RC6 power-savings support under Linux.

Red Hat: OpenStack and Financial News

Security: Google and Morgan Marquis-Boire

  • Google: 25 per cent of black market passwords can access accounts

    The researchers used Google's proprietary data to see whether or not stolen passwords could be used to gain access to user accounts, and found that an estimated 25 per cent of the stolen credentials can successfully be used by cyber crooks to gain access to functioning Google accounts.

  • Data breaches, phishing, or malware? Understanding the risks of stolen credentials

    Drawing upon Google as a case study, we find 7--25\% of exposed passwords match a victim's Google account.

  • Infosec star accused of sexual assault booted from professional affiliations
    A well-known computer security researcher, Morgan Marquis-Boire, has been publicly accused of sexual assault. On Sunday, The Verge published a report saying that it had spoken with 10 women across North America and Marquis-Boire's home country of New Zealand who say that they were assaulted by him in episodes going back years. A woman that The Verge gave the pseudonym "Lila," provided The Verge with "both a chat log and a PGP signed and encrypted e-mail from Morgan Marquis-Boire. In the e-mail, he apologizes at great length for a terrible but unspecified wrong. And in the chat log, he explicitly confesses to raping and beating her in the hotel room in Toronto, and also confesses to raping multiple women in New Zealand and Australia."