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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How To Triple Boot (XP, Vista, Ubuntu) With Single Boot Screen

Filed under
HowTos

Since Ubuntu 6.10 was release less than a month ago, Windows Vista went RTM and dates for new Ubuntu 7.4 were announced today, I thought I’ll post a tutorial on how to create a single boot screen triple boot system with Windows XP, Windows Vista and Ubuntu Edgy Eft.

Firefox 2.0 vs IE 7.0

Filed under
Software

Fighting over the same piece of the proverbial pie, Firefox introduces its version 2.0 just as Internet Explorer debuts its own version 7.0, whose previous release had been a long time coming. So just what are these improvements? And which company with come out on top for global internet browser dominance? Lets do some side by side comparison.

An interview with Linux Australia's cover girl

Filed under
Interviews

It can be tough being a woman in an industry where almost four in five people are men. Liz Tay speaks with Waugh about her experiences, passion for technology and open source, and advice on how to take on the skills shortage in Australia.

Linus Torvalds Officially a Hero

Filed under
Linux

"The European edition of the Time magazine has selected Linus Torvalds as one of the heroes of the past 60 years. The article on Linus is titled 'By giving away his software, the Finnish programmer earned a place in history.' Linus is cited in the 'Rebels & Leaders' category along with Nelson Mandela, Mikhail Gorbachev, Margaret Thatcher, and others."

Why is the linux file hierarchy better?

Filed under
Linux

There are many articles around the web about the differences between the windows file hierarchy and the linux one. One thing they don't say is which one is better and why. My aim in this article is to show why the linux file hierarchy is a better model.

How Red Hat Lost Friends And Gained New Enemies

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat, once the little company that could, for years could do no wrong. It rode the rising popularity of Linux to become a $280 million-a-year company with a market cap as high as $6 billion, claiming 80% of the market for Linux-based enterprise servers. Other Linux-friendly vendors loved Red Hat, since it gave them and their customers a viable alternative to Windows. Even Microsoft, while openly anti-Linux, didn't treat Red Hat as too much of a threat.

How To Compile A Kernel - The Fedora Way

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HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on Fedora systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

'Doom' creator turned rocket pioneer

Filed under
Interviews

Best known for creating two of the world's most ground-breaking video games, Doom and Quake, John Carmack is quietly breaking ground in another nascent field: commercial rocketry.

Novell and Microsoft’s deal - A Call to Action

Filed under
SUSE

Novell bit the hand that feeds it. The Novell/Microsoft announcement reminds me of the saying, “Communism is a great concept, on paper”. This deal sounds nice, especially to the uninformed. Novell really has helped out the community with this deal!

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 177

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • News: Samba denounces Novell, openSUSE 10.2, F vs U, Debian etch kernels, Slackware changelog

  • Competition: Winners of Mandriva Linux 2007 PowerPack
  • Released last week: Debian GNU/Linux 3.1r4, NetBSD Live! 2007
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 7.04, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0
  • Site news: PHR topics
  • New additions: DiscoverStation, Olive, paldo
  • New distributions: Absolute, Omaemona 2ch/Linux, LearnTux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Edgy pushed me over the edge

Filed under
Ubuntu

Today I am running a year-old version of Ubuntu Linux. In the world of Ubuntu Linux, where new releases are issued every six months, year-old Breezy is distinctly old.

Sun's Historic Java Announcement

Filed under
OSS

This is an historic day. Let's share it together. Sun believes deeply in creating communities and sharing innovations and technologies to foster more participation. Today in a historic move, Sun is opening the door to greater innovation by open sourcing key Java implementations.

Also: Download sun java GPL’d source code

Is Free Software the future of India? Steve Ballmer CEO of Microsoft answers...

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Microsoft

The solemn occasion was the talk show hosted by NDTV 24x7 - a premier cable television news channel in India. The very first question that was asked off Steve Ballmer was the following: Is Free Software the future of India?

Why I finally switched to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

My first two months of using Ubuntu were pretty... difficult. Installing Linux on a laptop (for complete beginners) was supposedly a relatively complex task (specially if, like me, you don't like asking questions on forums). So I basically ended up with a pretty buggy installation (less buggy than my Windows partition, even though my laptop is only three months old). But still, other than my original ideological motivations, what could possibly warrant a definitive switch to Ubuntu?

KMyMoney: Coming along, but still not there

Filed under
Software

KMyMoney is KDE's personal financial management program. If you don't have complex needs and a lot of history to import, KMyMoney lets you set up accounts, enter transactions, and generate reports easily, and other features are doable with some help from the generous amounts of documentation. However, KMyMoney is not a good choice for small business owners, who need more functionality than it can provide.

Open source rival takes on Google Maps

Filed under
Software

Volunteer "citizen cartographers" are aiming to take on the likes of Google Maps and Ordnance Survey by creating a free open source wiki-style map of the planet.

Large public-sector Linux project flops

Filed under
Linux

A publicly funded Linux project which cost UK taxpayers half-a-million pounds has flopped. Birmingham City Council began the project — one of the largest public-sector Linux projects in the UK — in May 2005 to evaluate the potential of open-source software. The council, the largest local authority in the UK, intended to deploy open-source software on 1,500 PCs in libraries across the city.

UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 2: The vi text editor

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Linux

The vi text editor might seem counterintuitive to new users but, make no mistake, there is a good reason this 30-year old tool is still widely used by many of the best developers in the world. The vi text editor separates operations into insert mode and command mode, which gives you ultrafast access to key commands that can edit, insert, and move text in on-the-fly, user-defined segments.

Microsoft patent pledge an 'empty promise'

Filed under
Microsoft

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) has dismissed Microsoft's patent pledge to open source developers as "meaningless" and warned that it could provide a false sense of security.

CLI Magic: Enhancing the shell with fish

Filed under
Software

The Friendly Interactive Shell (fish) is an alternative command line that is designed to be easy to learn and use. fish turns on by default options that are available in shells such as Bash or tcsh and develops them far beyond other shells. The result is a command line that can go a long way toward curing the phobia that many GNU/Linux users nurse from their experience with the DOS command line.

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More in Tux Machines

Dual-core MCU Arduino compatible SBC has WiFi and audio

T-Firefly’s open-spec, Arduino Uno compatible Fireduino SBC offers Rockchip’s dual-core, Cortex-M3 RKNanoD MCU, plus WiFi, RTC, and MP3 audio. Chinese embedded firm T-Firefly is apparently the new name for T-Chip Technology, which sponsors the Firefly open source hardware project. Its Arduino I/O- and IDE-compatible, dual-core Fireduino board is supported by the Firefly project along with Linux/Android hacker boards like the Rockchip RK3128 based Firefly-RK3288 Reload and Firefly FirePrime. Schematics and the like have already been posted. Read more

A Variety Of OpenGL/OpenCL NVIDIA 367.27 vs. AMD Linux 4.7 + Mesa Git Benchmarks

For your viewing pleasure this afternoon are some fresh NVIDIA GeForce GTX 900/1000 benchmarks with the 367.27 display driver compared to various Radeon GCN GPUs using a patched Linux 4.7 kernel and Mesa 12.1-dev Git as of this past weekend. Read more

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols on Red Hat

  • ​Red Hat's JBoss moves to the cloud
    At Red Hat Summit in San Francisco, Red Hat announced the release of Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7. The company also introduced the JBoss Core Services Collection to help developers create JBoss enterprise applications.
  • ​Open-source Microsoft protocol aims to be a programming standard
    Microsoft -- yes, Microsoft -- announced at the DevNation conference in San Francisco that it's releasing an open-source language server protocol. More interesting still, this is being done in concert with Codenvy and Red Hat.
  • ​Red Hat makes container development easier
    In San Francisco at Red Hat Summit, Red Hat announced the release of the Red Hat Container Development Kit 2.1 (RHCDK). This new developer kit, one of the many free programming tool kits Red Hat offers its Linux customers, is meant to enable programmers to easily create enterprise-ready containerized applications which target both OpenShift 3 development and Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) environments.

SFLC represents FOSS developers at the OECD 2016 Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy: Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity

On 21-23 June 2016, Ministers and stakeholders gathered in Cancún, Mexico, for an OECD Ministerial Meeting on the Digital Economy: Innovation, Growth and Social Prosperity, to move the digital agenda forward in four key policy areas foundational to the growth of the digital economy. Our Legal Director, Mishi Choudhary represented the United States civil society at the OECD Ministerial Panel on The Economic and Social Benefits of Internet Openness, chaired by the Canadian Minister of Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Hon’ble Navdeep Singh Bains. Read more