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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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more openSUSE and Novell headlines

Filed under
SUSE
  • ReviewLinux.Com: First Look openSUSE 10.3 i386 DVD

  • Novell boosts desktop Linux
  • Novell Gives openSUSE the (Faster) Boot
  • New Feature List for OpenSUSE 10.3
  • Stay Away from OpenSUSE 10.3
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 Launch Party Locations
  • OpenSUSE Linux 10.3 Review
  • OpenSUSE 10.3 opens for business
  • And Novell Fires the First Shot

a few statistics:

Filed under
News
  • Swedish police saves 400 cars by using MySQL

  • Hardware4linux : more than 1500 systems reported and ranked
  • LATU Uruguay Buying 100,000 OLPC XO's Over Classmate PC!!

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • check weather conditions and forecasts on the command line

  • How to automatically sign in to Ubuntu
  • Using a MySQL Performance Tuning Analyzer Script
  • What package is that file in ?
  • Handy script protects Linux against traffic spikes
  • Use ssh on multiple servers at one time
  • Installing Audacity MP3 export support on Linux
  • Adjust the Transparency of Window Decorations with Compiz
  • Digitizing records and tapes with Audacity
  • Compiz-Fusion On Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy Gibbin”

Sweet Symphony is out of tune with OOo

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Last month, just one week after IBM announced it would help with OpenOffice.org's development, the company released Lotus Symphony, an office suite based on OpenOffice.org code. I found a lot of slick features in Lotus Symphony, but I worry that Symphony could affect the OpenOffice.org community adversely.

5 Reasons your parents should NOT use Linux

Filed under
Linux

foogazi.com: Lets face it, there are some parents that insist on using certain applications that are strictly made for Windows and just do not function properly in Wine. Some parents do not want alternatives to Windows applications.

Initial Impressions of Kubuntu 7.10 beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu-tutorials: My initial impressions are that KDE is very clean looking. The display is very crisp on my machine and its easy to navigate. It appears to have most of the applications I need out of the box.

Trying Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

omat.nl: I first tried KUbuntu Gutsy, but that halted on 'installing language pack' in the gui-installer. I tried to resolve that, but did not succeed in it. I installed MEPIS. The current stable 6.5 is based on ubuntu Dapper, which is kind of old. But that evening Helio pointed me to Mandriva.

The Penguin Grows Horns: Installing FreeBSD

Filed under
BSD

penguin pete: It has always bothered me that this site and my experiences stay inside of Linux so much, when the whole site is about "free and open source software". I've only dabbled in non-Linux FOSS with live CDs and such, but I'm ready to install a real BSD and stick with it for awhile.

Fedora 8 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: There's still a month until the final release of Fedora 8, but Fedora 8 Test 3 is now available, which has a wealth of a new features. Among these new features is an Online Desktop powered via BigBoard, KDE 3.5.7 can be found on the KDE Live images, improved Live installations, and improved yum performance for package management.

Also: What New in Fedora 8
And: Mmm... Fedora 8 Test 3...

Run your own home-entertainment server with Linux and MythTV

Filed under
HowTos

www.hexus.net: Once upon a time, people lived in caves and hunted animals with spears. Then, they recorded things from the TV onto small black cartridges filled with magnetic tape. As is tradition these days, as soon as people develop an interesting hardware device, people start work on a software-based solution to accomplish similar features on more conventional hardware - in this case, the VDR project began in February 2000 as an attempt to bring DVR functionality to a conventional GNU/Linux PC.

ext4 2.6.24 Merge Plans

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I've just released the 2.6.23-rc9-ext4-1. It collapses some patches in preparation for pushing them to Linus, and adds some of the cleanup patches that had been incorporated into Andrew's broken-out-2007-10-01-04-09 series," announced Theodore Ts'o.

Is it time to give Red Hat some respect?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet blogs: Red Hat is the Rodney Dangerfield of open source. We talk here a lot about Microsoft and Novell, about Sun and IBM. Red Hat just keeps plugging away.

Scott McGregor, Thunderbird Lead Engineer leaves Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla links: Scott McGregor, Thunderbird lead engineer, announced that on October 12 he will leave the Mozilla Corporation to pursuit other career interests. He plans, however, to continue his role as module owner for Thunderbird as a volunteer.

You want to learn about Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

the register: Ubuntu is the free Linux-based operating system designed with frequent updating in mind. Released in October 2004, it has evolved into one of the best-known branches of the Debian tree and offers a strong focus on usability and easy installation, whether it be on a laptop, desktop or server machine.

Announcing openSUSE 10.3 GM

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: The openSUSE team is proud to announce the release of openSUSE 10.3. Promoting the use of Linux everywhere, the openSUSE project provides free, easy access to the world’s most usable Linux distribution, openSUSE. openSUSE is released regularly, is stable, secure, contains the latest free and open source software, and comes with several new technologies.

S2 Games Announces Savage 2: A Tortured Soul Beta

Filed under
Gaming

mcvuk.com (pr): Independent game developer S2 Games announced today that Savage 2: A Tortured Soul, the sequel to its first PC title, Savage: The Battle for Newerth, has entered its beta testing phase and is nearing launch. Additionally, the game is being simultaneously designed for Linux Client users.

Kudos for Kino

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Kino is a video editor that allows you to produce your own video masterpieces using only free and open source software. With it, you can capture and edit clips from your video camera, add titles, insert still images, create transitions between scenes, and output the result in a number of formats. Best of all, it's easy to learn to use.

Challenges of Upgrading Linux

pcmechanic: As a result of my experiences I chose to increase my Linux experience and the best way to do that was install and set up Linux as a web and email server. Three years ago I chose to do that with Fedora, Apache2, and Sendmail. I was very happy with my new Fedora server and it ran perfectly until last Tuesday…

Hot, quick web designing with Firebug

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic: After doing a review of the Firefox Web Developer extension, One of our readers left a comment to recommend the Firebug extension, so I decided to give it a bash.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics