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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OpenSSH 4.5 fixes bugs

OpenSSH 4.5 was released today, fixing a number of bugs and security risks. T-shirts, posters and CDs continue to feature in OpenBSD and OpenSSH releases.

Ubuntu Edgy LAMP Server Installation with Screenshots

Filed under
HowTos

Automatic LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP) In about 15 minutes, the time it takes to install Ubuntu Edgy Server Edition, you can have a LAMP server up and ready to go. This feature, exclusive to Ubuntu Server Edition, is available at the time of installation.

OpenSUSE Is A Community Product - Respect That

Filed under
SUSE

It is just a matter of Novell and has nothing or very little to do with openSUSE. It’s a Novell management decision, has nothing to do with openSUSE nor the community.

Flying high with FlightGear

Filed under
Software

FlightGear is a top notch and highly accurate free software flight simulator. The software has no kill or be killed situations. Don’t expect arcade like dogfights and precision bombing. Such features are not included. However, with a large range of planes to choose from and with most of the world covered by accurate maps expect a realistic experience as near to a holodeck as software only can allow.

Mark Shuttleworth: Simplified, rationalised licensing

Filed under
OSS

Richard Stallman is the man I admire most in the free software world. Nobody else has so clearly articulated, so beautifully argued for the freedom to change your own software and the freedom to share it. I’m absolutely convinced it is free source, not “open” source, which is at the heart of the innovation that will carry free software to ubiquity.

Linux printing: much done and more to do

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Linux

In the last seven years, printing on Linux has undergone a metamorphosis. Barely adequate printing support, provided on a program by program basis, has been transmuted by a half dozen projects into a wealth of options comparable to those available on Windows or the Mac OS. Where printer manufacturers once ignored Linux, a growing number support it and the rest are watching closely. Standardization and support for multiple distributions remain major problems, but community and corporate interests have recently started working together to address these last remaining problems.

The Linux desktop is dead

Filed under
Linux

Linux is unlikely ever to be a viable alternative to Microsoft's Windows on the desktop for corporate IT departments, according to leading CIOs.

NVIDIA brings Vista-esque graphics to Linux

Filed under
Software

NVIDIA has officially released a Linux driver that supports a compatible version of the AIGLX instruction set.

White box makers to pre-install SUSE Linux desktop

Filed under
SUSE

Novell officials are pleased to note four white box PC makers will distribute new PCs pre-loaded with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 operating system.

How To Compile A Kernel - The Ubuntu Way

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on Ubuntu systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Fedora Core Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This is the first Fedora Core review I've written, but it's not because I didn't want to write one before. I've tested every Fedora release since the very first one, and have declined to write about it because it never seemed to work properly and I don't like writing totally negative reviews.

Ubuntu maker to distribute Sun's Java

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Ubuntu

Canonical will distribute Sun's open-source Glassfish software for running Java on servers with the Ubuntu version of Linux, the companies plan to announce Wednesday.

Chapter 8: Setting Up a Game Server with BZFlag

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HowTos

To try your hand at setting up and playing from your own gaming server, I describe how to configure Battle Zone capture the Flag (BZFlag). BZFlag is a fun 3D tank battle game, designed to be played against others over a network. After you set up a BZFlag server, you can have players battle each other over the network using clients on other Linux, BSD, Mac OS X, or Windows systems.

Slam-dunk for Linux - a review of Fedora Core 6

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Linux
Reviews

A line has been drawn. Apple’s MacOS X and the free Linux desktop now possess modern 3D accelerated user interfaces that are absolutely top-notch, and Microsoft, as yet, does not. The first and most noticeable of these is the new ‘desktop effects’ control panel, which provides the user with the option to enable the new 3D accelerated GUI.

New Nvidia Linux Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-9629
Operating System: Linux x86, IA32, AMD64/EM64T, FreeBSD x86, Solaris x64/x86
Release Date: November 7, 2006

Details of Novell-MS Pact - The SEC filing

Filed under
SUSE

Novell promises not to sue Microsoft's customers for using Microsoft software. Microsoft promises not to sue Novell SUSE paid customers for using Novell SUSE. They each pay each other millions. But it's not a patent cross license. No sirree. Why that would violate the GPL, don't you know. In fact, it isn't a license at all.

Also: Novell gets $348 million from Microsoft

NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTX / 8800GTS Linux Preview

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Hardware

Coming out of the green camp today is a hard launch of the GeForce 8800GTX and 8800GTS. These G80-based graphics cards are designed to deliver a new level of graphics realism for gamers and enthusiasts alike. At Phoronix we have a technical preview this morning of the GeForce 8 series as we look at primarily how the GeForce 8 Family will affect GNU/Linux users.

A More Positive gNewSense Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

A recent announcement on Distrowatch.com for a new distro called gNewSense perked my attention. It seems that the Free Software Foundation, the group headed by Richard M Stallman, otherwise known as RMS, sponsored this project and basically was conceived "due to Frustrated by many Linux distributions which include (or make it easy to include) non-free software in their products.

Jono Bacon: UDS so far

Filed under
Ubuntu

Well, I have been at the UDS for a few days, and there is lots of stuff going on around many different parts of Ubuntu and the community. Prepare for one of my rather ugly bullet-points-lists-of-ultimate-doom:

My Rant for gNewSense 1.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

gNewSense came to me via a random suggestion on LinuxForums. These excite me because some of the most hilariously bad distributions I've ever tried have come to me this very same way. Looking at the rather sparse website for this distribution further fueled my excitement because it looks like essentially a reactionist derivative of Ubuntu that's sanctioned by the Free Software Foundation.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more