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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 11:29am
Story Linus Torvalds runs one of the most world's important software projects from a tiny 'Zombie shuffling' desk Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 9:15am
Story Linux 4.0-RC1 Tagged, Linux 4.0 Will Bring Many Notable Improvements Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 9:06am
Story Running Bodhi 3.0.0 Legacy on Older Hardware Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 8:47am
Story Q4OS 0.5.26 version released Roy Schestowitz 23/02/2015 - 8:45am
Story Leftovers: KDE and GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:27pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 to Get Locally Integrated Menus by Default Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:23pm
Story Cinnamon 2.6 brings panels to multiple monitors Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 7:44pm
Story Ubuntu Kylin 14.04.2 LTS Is Out for Chinese Users with Linux Kernel 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 5:33pm

5 Reasons Why Linux is Recession Proof

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: What's more stable than a rock, faster than a spinning disk, more powerful than a Windows system twice its size, and able to leap platforms like no other operating system? Surprise! It's Linux. It's also recession proof.

Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The third annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit will take place from the 8th to the 10th of April in San Francisco, California at the Hotel Kabuki.

Why Google open-sources code: 'Fuzzy feelings'

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: Google's desktop team has put together a short list of the reasons that Google open-sources software. The reasons may surprise you:

Open Solutions Alliance - not off-course for open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I read a fairly critical blog about Gold and the OSA from Glyn Moody. I believe that Moody raises some valid points and offers Gold the opportunity to clarify the OSA’s dedication to truly open standards and openness in enterprise software later in the comments. However, I must disagree.

It's time to customize the OS

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: Mass customization -- the process of customizing a product to meet individual needs while leveraging mass production efficiency -- is commonplace in manufacturing everything from cars to laptops. Yet the operating system has remained monolithic. Ironically, Linux is modular and designed to be customized.

Brilliant scripting with Guile

Filed under
Linux

Guile isn't just another extension language: it's the official extension language of the GNU project. Guile makes Scheme embeddable, which makes the interpreter ideal for embedded scripting and more.

LCA2009: It's a Linux conference - but there's Macs aplenty

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: One thing that has been increasing exponentially at the Australian national Linux conference is that shiny, steel-grey laptop - or, at times, the sleek white one.

"In the Middle of Difficulty Lies Opportunity"

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxfoundation.org/blog-entry: Today's surprising news of 5,000 Microsoft jobs cut might be good news or bad for Linux, depending on how you look at it. As a Linux advocate, it's very easy to sit here and start spouting off that this is what Microsoft deserves, after running big and bloated for so long.

Does Windows 7 Threaten Mac OS and Linux?

Filed under
OS

earthweb.com: Does a good OS from Microsoft put the pressure back on Apple and the Linux development community? After all, both the Mac OS and Linux have benefitted from the fact that early adopters of Vista experienced declared the OS a lemon, with the worldwide market share in both OSes climbing significantly over the past couple of years.

The Netbook Newbie's Guide to Linux

Filed under
Linux

reghardware.co.uk: True to its name, a netbook makes a very decent ebook reader. Here's the freely-downloadable Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, complete with original Tenniel illustrations, as it appears on the MSI Wind:

Darwin at 200 and Linux at 20

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: This post is about things that look like other things but really are very different in origin and structure. For example desktop interfaces now look pretty similar to me.

LCA2009: Why ODF should be the chosen one

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: It is difficult to know whether Louis Suarez-Potts, community manager at OpenOffice.org, was conscious at any point today of the irony of criticising proprietary software while making a presentation using a MacBook.

Ext4 to be standard for Fedora 11, Btrfs also included

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: According to current plans, version 11 of Fedora, which is expected to arrive in late May, will use Ext4 as its standard file system. That's what the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee (FESCo) recently decided, following a heated discussion in an IRC meeting.

Cloning Linux Systems With CloneZilla Server Edition (CloneZilla SE)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can clone Linux systems with CloneZilla SE. This is useful for copying one Linux installation to multiple computers without losing much time, e.g. in a classroom, or also for creating an image-based backup of a system.

Hidden Linux : More secure deletion tools

Filed under
Software

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: Last time I introduced a couple of open source tools to securely delete files, folders or whole hard drives. Naturally Linux has more!

GNU/Linux races for Best Desktop

Filed under
Linux

norsetto.890m: La Repubblica, one of the two major Italian newspapers, has opened a competition for the most beautiful, original personal desktop.

How “Simplifying” Linux Just Made It Worse

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Some time after Linux netbook started appearing, it became obvious that there was a problem. Every time a new manufacturer gets in to the business, they try to build a completely custom Linux system that is “easier.”

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • do you believe in fate?

  • Gparted - Gnome Partition Editor in openSUSE
  • Using Linux to Leapfrog the Competition
  • VMware developers release GUI debugging tool for GTK+
  • Bringing Up Open Source, Part 2: The Consumer Side
  • Congratulations Mr President - Linux Australia goes to the vote
  • LCA2009: Sugar Labs tries to pick up the pieces
  • The Problems Facing Sugar Learning Platform
  • Building A OLPC Case From Spare Shampoo Bottles
  • Live from Down Under: Report from Linux.conf.au 2009
  • Why Ubuntu stays top of Distrowatch and Digg
  • Flock 64 Bit Browser on Linux (with 64-bit Flash support)
  • Firefox 3.1: Thanks For The Memory
  • Phoenix Strikes HyperSpace Deal With ASUS
  • Linux, Windows 7 Beta Could Be Hit By Downadup Worm
  • Linux Tells Us What’s Up (new version of ’sup’ tool!)
  • losing that Drupal lovin
  • Rar and Unrar for Fedora 10
  • Adding Wbar, Prism, and Gadgets to Ubuntu
  • Dropbox on 11.1
  • How To Move Your Server From Windows To Linux
  • 'Scroll animating' an image

Ubuntu's Shuttleworth praises Windows 7, welcomes fight

Filed under
Microsoft
Interviews
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: Speaking with The Reg, the founder of popular Linux distro Ubuntu and chief executive of Canonical called Windows 7 a great operating system.

Linux video converter is now available

Filed under
Software

rudd-o.com: True to its flexible and capable roots, Linux has a ton of ways to convert videos, with multiple competing projects all featuring astounding capabilities. Regrettably, they all are either command-line programs or very, very complicated. Until today.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more