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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story My Raspberry Pi Adventure srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 9:20pm
Story Epiphany 3.8 gets integrated AdBlock srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 9:18pm
Story HP webOS: Open Source Software Reaches 1.0 srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 6:49pm
Story Dreamlinux Is No More :( srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 6:45pm
Story From Noobs to Experts: Is There an ABC for Linux Distros? srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 6:44pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 4:28pm
Story Blender 2.64 released srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 4:00am
Story Thinking Small With Tiny Core Linux srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 3:58am
Story 10 obscure Linux apps you should know about srlinuxx 04/10/2012 - 2:03am
Story Greg KH: 5 Open Source Projects That Need Developers srlinuxx 03/10/2012 - 9:38pm

Linux: KVM Adds Support For SMP Guests

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A recently merged KVM patchset included support for guest SMP, various performance improvements, and suspend/resume fixes. KVM stands for Kernel-based Virtual Machine, "a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions".

Open-source Democracy Player relaunches as Miro

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: The Participatory Culture Foundation (PCF) has renamed and relaunched its open-source television platform in hopes of offering an "open, mass medium of online television." What was once known as Democracy Player is now Miro.

Avogadro Gets Some Sweet POVRay Goodness

Filed under
KDE

blog.cryos.net: It has been a while since I last posted about progress with Avogadro. I have been doing a lot of under the hood improvements which has been really frustrating at times and hard to blog about. At last I have some real output and have just committed the code to the repository.

KDE hacker authors Qt book

Filed under
Misc

linuxdevices: Core KDE developer Daniel Molkentin has written a book about Trolltech's cross-platform application development toolkit. Published by NoStarch Press, and entitled, "The Book of Qt 4."

Review: Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: Puppy Linux is a light weight Linux distribution built from scratch and born in mid 2002. It’s creator, Barry Kauler, originally created Puppy Linux as a fun project to do in his spare time. But recent tension in the community have spawned some heated controversy of late.

With new code base, Supergamer is fun again

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

linux.com: Supergamer is a unique Linux distribution whose primary focus is on fun -- specifically, gaming. Supergamer VL, now based on VectorLinux, is all new, with additional games, new code base, and new look and feel. Let the games begin.

Windows users are whiners

Filed under
Linux

vnunetblogs: "Linux is hard to install" You probably bought a computer with Windows preinstalled and bought a new one when it came to a grinding halt. Next time try reinstalling it from scratch, drivers and applications included.

Too Many Linux Distros Makes For Open-Source Mess

informationweek blogs: Remember the 1980s worries about how the "forking" of Unix could hurt that operating system's chances for adoption? That was nothing compared to the mess we've got today with Linux.

Ubuntu is more popular than kittens AND pie

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher: In a mildly childish attempt at putting the popularity of Ubuntu into real context, I've enlisted the help of Google trends to benchmark searches for "Ubuntu" against other words. Mindless spam or important sociological experiment?

openSUSE gets a new manager

Filed under
SUSE

LWN: It appears that former openSUSE manager Andreas Jaeger has been promoted within Novell, so the management of the openSUSE distribution has been passed to Stephan Kulow.

Innovate! Innovate!

Filed under
OSS

Paul Cutler: GUADEC, the annual GNOME user and developer conference, is in full swing in England right now. One of my favorite times of the year as a GNOME user, all the GNOME developers get together and blog about all the cool stuff they’re working on, or want to be working on.

Blindly applying proprietary metrics to open source

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: I am constantly amused at how people try to apply the metrics of proprietary software to open source. This can even happen within open source companies.

Howto: Add a new yum repository to install software under CentOS / Redhat Linux

Filed under
HowTos

nixcraft: CentOS / Fedora Core / RHEL 5 uses yum for software management. Yum allows you to add a new repository as a source to install binary software.

Installing Freespire 2.0 for Newbies

Filed under
Linux

softpedia: Not yet in its final version, Freespire 2.0 is a Ubuntu-based Linux operating system that combines the best that free, open source software has to offer. It provides users with the choice of including proprietary drivers, codecs and applications as they see fit.

Hardware and Software on Linux Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Random: I was surfing the net when my brother asked me to print something for school. It occurred to me that I had forgotten to install my printer when I was setting everything up. I had to reboot into XP for him.

Novell Launches Linux Champions Club in Asia Pacific

Filed under
SUSE

smbedge.com: Novell announced today the launch of the Asia Pacific chapter of the Novell Linux Champions Club, following the success of the Champions Club in Europe. The objective of the Club is to build a community of Linux proponents among Novell’s strategic partners and their partners, eventually creating a Linux-friendly ecosystem in Asia Pacific.

More KWord & KOffice updates

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers: Some weeks ago KOffice alpha1 got tagged; but some balls were dropped and it never was uploaded to the ftp site. The good news is that even more new cool stuff is visible in the KOffice Alpha2 which will probably come out end of August.

Finding the hidden bells and whistles in Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

zdnet (techrepublic): Mozilla Firefox, now in release 2.0, has made huge advancements in Web browsing. Tabbed browsing and anti-phishing protection are its most visible improvements. Other features can be added into the browser through extensions, making this browser do more of users' bidding.

Also: Firefox 2.0.0.5 On Mirrors

Linux: PlugSched, Pluggable CPU Schedulers

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Updating the pluggable scheduler patches for the 2.6.22 kernel, Peter Williams noted, "probably the last one now that CFS is in the main line". CFS author Ingo Molnar asked, "why is CFS in mainline a problem?

Open Source Science-Fiction Movie Aims to be a Fully Collaborative Effort

Filed under
Movies

Press Release: New open source movie project aims to create a full community of users who collaborate in the creation and execution of a short science-fiction film titled Jathia's Wager, from writing and editing the script to choosing the cast.

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This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

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via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.