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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story significant events in Linux's 20-year history srlinuxx 13/09/2011 - 2:42am
Story No Patents, Please, Just Open Source srlinuxx 13/09/2011 - 2:36am
Story Is Ubuntu Driving Users Away? srlinuxx 2 12/09/2011 - 9:05pm
Story Russian Linux: Simply Works! srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:58pm
Story Linux Is Dead...and My Students See Dead Linux! srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:54pm
Story CentOS 6 is finally deployed srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:46pm
Story Linux, a second class system? srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:44pm
Story ALT Linux 6 KDesktop review srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:41pm
Story 2011 Gentoo Screenshot Contest Results srlinuxx 12/09/2011 - 8:39pm
Story Linux sites fall victim to hacking attack srlinuxx 3 12/09/2011 - 8:37pm

Free Software Versus Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

The terms "Free Software" and "Open Source Software" are often used interchangeably, and even abbreviated together as F/OSS (for "Free/Open Source Software"). Are there any differences between the two? If so, what are those differences? If not, why do the two different names exist? David Chisnall examines this paradox.

The Birth of Free Software

Using RADIUS to authenticate users with RSA SecurID

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I was tasked with authenticating users who carry RSA SecurID tokens. I was highly inspired by Jeff Wirth and his success using RADIUS to authenticate with SecurID Tokens on FreeBSD. While I'm not a fan of non-free software, it's possible to make each server authenticate against the non-free RSA Ace server using only free software.

The Visual History of Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

While Debian has been around for over a decade, Gentoo for five years, and Mandriva/Mandrake for nearly nine years, in less than three years of existence Ubuntu has received the most attention and generated the greatest amount of publicity in the Linux limelight. Why is that?

Top five PC manufacturers fail naked PC test

Filed under
Hardware

IT professionals are being forced to adopt Microsoft's operating systems — even if they tell their PC supplier they want a system free of Microsoft software, ZDNet UK's research has revealed.

Why Linux Mint?

Filed under
Ubuntu

I received an interesting email the other day that I wanted to share with you:

Hi, Matt
Here’s another tip-of-the-cap for Linux Mint, as compared to my Ubuntu distro.

Science stars trace a long handwritten journey

Filed under
Software

Alan Pierce stands next to a computer in a darkened classroom and traces "h-e-l-l-o" on a small computer's touch-sensitive data entry screen.

Instantly, "hello" appears in typewritten text, projected on a 5-by-8-foot wall screen behind him, below the likeness of his handwritten greeting.

Canonical Ltd Launches Global Partner Programme for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, today announced its newly created Partner Programme to drive awareness and adoption of business-ready, Open Source server platforms, and desktop solutions.

Backing Up with Keep

Filed under
HowTos

Keep is the second entry in my Backing Up series. It is a lightweight app that makes it simple to create and manage multiple backups. At first glance Keep's feature set looks very solid, but when trying it out I quickly discovered some limitations that really limit its potential.

I tested with version 0.3.0 and 0.4.0 on Kubuntu Edgy and 0.4.0 on Debian Etch.

Appearance and Useability

Will Microsoft buy Novell?

Filed under
SUSE

The answer to that question is probably not, though the thought had crossed my mind. In a way they already have done in a small way, they have given Novell approximately a quater's worth of net profit in return for what appears to be a cut of all Open Enterprise and SUSE Linux sales. Although no shares have changed hands, this, in itself, seems to me to be a kind of "virtual" company sale.

Nominations open for second annual Mellon Foundation technology awards

Filed under
OSS

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's Research in Information Technology (RIT) program has opened nominations for the 2007 Mellon Awards for Technology Collaboration (MATC). Prizes of $50,000 to $100,000 will be awarded to the winners in December. Any open source software project that assists educational or not-for-profit ventures is eligible to be nominated, and self-nominations are allowed.

Taiwan notebook players sound off on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Considering that Dell recently asked its clients for their opinions on selling Linux-based notebooks, it was interesting to raise the same question to Taiwan-based notebook http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/add/storyplayers, and the results showed that branded players are more conservative than ODM manufacturers concerning adopting Linux compared with a Microsoft operating system (OS).

Ubuntu impressions 5 days on

Filed under
Ubuntu

Five days ago I installed linux for the first time in a decade. am I impressed? Hell yes. upfront, ease of use, intuitive configuration and accessibility were great. everything was detected and worked out of the box, or should i say out of the ISO.

Apache Software Foundation: 2007 Open Source Outlook

Filed under
Interviews

Open Source is enjoying a fabulous ride, with F1000 adoption growing, developers and architects seeking training and new projects incubating and maturing all the time.

Recovering data from a damaged partition

Filed under
HowTos

Most of the time GNU/Linux is a powerful Operating System. Sometimes, i wish i had think thought before using one of its great console command, the simple and rapid dd.

In order to make room on one hard drive, i used dd to sweep the first 512 bytes of the boot sector, in order to let the other operating system to boot by itself instead of using lilo.

Step 1: what is missing ?

How to display Microsoft fonts like in Windows in CentOS?

Filed under
HowTos

Staying in front of your computer for hours and hours with the default fonts can be a challenge on Linux/Unix. I, for one, can't work properly without the Windows fonts comfort Smile

People Behind KDE: Pino Toscano

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Pino Toscano
Date: 15th March 2007

A SHORT INTRO

Age: 21
Located in: Catania, Italy
Occupation: University student
Nickname on IRC: pinotree
Claim to Fame: okular, kig, KDE-Edu
Fav. KDE applications: Konqueror, Kate, KNetwalk
Blog: http://www.kdedevelopers.org/blog/2661

THE INTERVIEW

In what ways do you make a contribution to KDE?

The Magic of Simultaneous Contrast

Filed under
Howtos

The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to the idea of simultaneous contrast and to the amazing effects of color interactions. Color is the single most important tool that artists and designers used throughout the ages to beautify their environment. But to use color effectively one has to understand its basic functions, its psychological and visual impacts on the environment.

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2

Filed under
Linux

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2 - Andreas Jaeger has announced the second alpha release of openSUSE 10.3: "I'm glad to announce the second public alpha release of openSUSE 10.3. Call for testing: We're using the libata stack now also for IDE controllers.

Novell deal yields dividends - for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

A "sizeable number" of developers have jumped ship from Novell to Red Hat, according to Scott Crenshaw, the senior director for product management and marketing at Red Hat.

Novell users say Linux transitions successful

Filed under
SUSE

As Novell kicks off its annual user conference, customers are enthusiastic about their transitions from the legacy NetWare operating system to Linux. There’s discord, however, among Novell users regarding the company’s controversial technology pact with Microsoft.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more