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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca KDE review Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 10:59am
Story 9 Hidden Features in KDE Roy Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 10:55am
Story GNOME 3.16.1 Arrives on April 15, Arch Linux Users Can Now Update to GNOME 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 5:33am
Story Introducing Chromixium, an Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Distro that Looks Like Chrome OS Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 3:41am
Story Evolution of Solus and Fedora 22 Delayed Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 3:37am
Story Cinnamon 2.4.8 Desktop Environment Is Now Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 12:25am
Story GNOME 3.16.1 newstable tarballs due Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 12:21am
Story Three New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Were Patched in Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 12:15am
Story Git Success Stories and Tips from Tor Chief Architect Nick Mathewson Rianne Schestowitz 10/04/2015 - 12:06am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 09/04/2015 - 11:57pm

Two Reasons the Command Line Trumps the Graphical User Interface

Filed under
Software

blog.eracc.com: I am not a text mode Luddite. I use a graphical user interface (GUI) every day. However, for certain tasks a GUI is just not the best choice.

Supercomputer niche chucks rocks at Nehalem

Filed under
Gentoo
Hardware

theregister.co.uk: As niche supercomputer-maker SiCortex works on the next generation of its line and watches the IT marketing machine gearing up for Intel's impending Nehalem-based Xeon EP, the company says that Chipzilla isn't moving in the right direction for high-performance computing (HPC) workloads.

Why Is Moblin's X.Org Stack Faster Than In Ubuntu?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Canonical's Scott James Remnant recently set out to explore why X.Org started up so much faster on Moblin than on Ubuntu.

O hai Knoppix

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: I’ve successfully download the latest version of Knoppix and it’s now running live from my USB drive. Awesome, ain’t it?

TomTom Linux impact light hit so far

Filed under
Legal

blogs.the451group: I’ve been talking to device manufacturers and the Linux-centered software providers and I can definitively report that I am not hearing or sensing any fear, uncertainty or doubt (FUD) as a result of Microsoft’s TomTom patent suit.

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 5

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: It will be at least another week or two before Linux kernel 2.6.29 becomes available. The Kernel Log will, therefore, continue its report about the new features scheduled for 2.6.29 with what's new in terms of file systems.

Delayed allocation and the zero-length file problem

Filed under
Software

thunk.org/tytso: A recent Ubuntu bug has gotten slashdotted, and has started raising a lot of questions about the safety of using ext4. The essential “problem” is that ext4 implements something called delayed allocation.

The Free Beer Economy

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: Why is FREE! the world's best-selling noun, verb, adjective and adverb, yet so hard to credit as a foundation for business in the Internet Age? And what will happen when business folk finally grok the abundant opportunities that FREE! provides?

Russia Rolls Out Open Source for Government

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: Russia is rapidly turning into open source's best-kept secret. I wrote about plans to roll out free software to all schools; more recently, there has been talk about creating a Russian operating system based on Fedora. And now there's this:

Mozilla Contemplates a Future Without Google

Filed under
Moz/FF

businessweek.com: Google also shows up all over the balance sheet of Mozilla, creator of the Firefox browser and other software. To date, the arrangement has proved mutually beneficial. How much longer this pairing can last has been called into question since September.

the new look of plasma

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: Yesterday I updated KDE SVN. So, I have the latest dev stuff on my box again. Upon logging in, I was greeted by the new look of plasma.

Linux Has Worse Device Support Than Windows...I Don't Think So

Filed under
Linux

riplinton.blogspot: I was cleaning a virus out of a Windows XP system for a client when the UPS driver showed up with my latest gadget. The virus was one of the fake Anti-Virus viruses, you know, the kind that pops up all kinds of warnings.

High-security, RAMdisk Linux rev'd

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: An interesting physical security-focused Linux distribution was upgraded a couple of days ago. Tin Hat Linux reportedly takes a Vista-like five minutes to boot, because its whole filesystem is decrypted and loaded from an optical drive onto a RAMdisk (tmpfs). But after that, it's likely Puppy-fast!

Open source apps are no small free beer

Filed under
OSS

guardian.co.uk: Richard Stallman once wrote that the point about free software is it is "free as in freedom, not free as in beer", meaning that people should be at liberty to do as they pleased with software, rather than subscribe to its restrictive licences.

Finding rootfs during boot

Filed under
Linux

4 tips to avoid or fix Linux system cannot mount rootfs errors at boot time

Using iSCSI On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can set up an iSCSI target and an iSCSI initiator (client), both running Debian Lenny. The iSCSI protocol is a storage area network (SAN) protocol which allows iSCSI initiators to use storage devices on the (remote) iSCSI target using normal ethernet cabling.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Caustic Graphics Will Provide Linux Support

  • Did Microsoft make Firefox?
  • Exherbo Over Twice as Stable as Gentoo?
  • Update on openSUSE Infrastructure Services (download.opensuse.org)
  • Towards an agreed taxonomy for open source business strategies
  • Linux in 30 Days
  • Channel 4 fails to open archives to Mac, Linux fans
  • Linux Outlaws 81 - Double-Enders
  • Instant Pictoguide to Knoppix 6.0
  • Open source is not charity
  • Linpus QuickOS puts Linux into fifth gear
  • Kodak Announces Select Document Scanners With Support For LINUX
  • The Frugal Laptop
  • Crossover Games Considering DX10
  • So you want to sell open source
  • Repository Adding Via Apt-URL - An Overlooked Feature of Ubuntu 9.04
  • Preventing Abuse of Free Software
  • Book Review: Using Drupal
  • The Periodic Table of Typefaces
  • Mozilla looks to turbocharge Firefox's new-tab skills

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Get Android’s fonts on Ubuntu

  • 10 Most important linux networking commands
  • Run Levels in a Nutshell
  • Free Disk Space by Reducing Reserved Blocks
  • Tutorial: Adjusting volume in Mencoder
  • Civilization IV on Linux with Wine 1.1.16
  • Installing Sun Java SE 6, Apache Maven 2 and Tomcat 5 on Ubuntu
  • How to install VMware Workstation 6.5.1 in Gentoo
  • Installing Torbutton on Mandriva 2009.1
  • Watch the National Debt from the Command Line
  • HowTo install iotop on Debian Etch
  • Exim4 SMTP Auth for the Real World
  • Twitting from the Linux Command Line
  • Modify your application to use XDG folders
  • Kick all users except you
  • Create Screencasts with recordMyDesktop
  • Spring forward file fixing

Interview With Agostino Russo - Wubi - Ubuntu

Filed under
Interviews

howsoftwareisbuilt.com: In this interview we talk with Agostino about The history of Wubi, Providing a bridge for Windows users to try Linux easily, Integrating Wubi into the Linux community and specifically Ubuntu, and more.

Two in race for Debian project leader

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: It's that time of the year again - the Debian GNU/Linux project is in election mode with the process for electing a leader for 2009-10 having begun.

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Review: BunsenLabs Helium

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KaOS 2018.06

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Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
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