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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 03 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ZAZ – An addictive puzzle game for Linux srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 8:35pm
Story How to give away computers with edu/ubuntu srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 8:33pm
Story Moving from Gentoo to Ubuntu for a while srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 8:31pm
Story Compiz – The most rock-solid window manager ever srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 5:22pm
Story Xfce 4.8pre2 Released srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 5:20pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 152 srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 5:19pm
Story Trying to go back srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 5:17pm
Story Puppy Arcade 10 released srlinuxx 05/12/2010 - 5:15pm
Story Installing SugarCRM Community Edition On Fedora 14 falko 05/12/2010 - 5:03pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 Alpha 1 review srlinuxx 3 05/12/2010 - 11:52am

Ubuntu Linux On Thinkpad T43p: Wow!

Filed under
Ubuntu

After reading report after report of people using Ubuntu Linux on various flavors of desktop and laptop computers, I've finally decided to give it a try.

Emacs tips: Customize your Emacs experience

Filed under
HowTos

One of the principal advantages of Emacs over competing editors is how flexible and customizable it is. In fact, in several other "Emacs tips" columns, you may find references to customizing your setup. It's a big topic, so this is a quick start guide to the fundamentals: the .emacs file and basic customization techniques.

rPath Named as Finalist for LinuxWorld San Francisco 2006 Product Excellence Awards

Filed under
Linux

rPath’s solutions named as finalists in three categories – Best Open Source Solution, Best Utility Grid Computing Solution and Best Virtualization Solution

n/a

KateOS 3.0 Released & Tested

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

KateOS 3.0 was released early this morning and happily Tuxmachines was granted a preview. This release brings lots of new changes as well as a great looking new theme. Performance and stability remain, as always, well above par. KateOS has always been one of our favorite distributions, and this release doesn't change that either. What is new this release?

The cosmonaut's crusade for free computers

Filed under
Ubuntu

What would you do if you'd made £400m in the last tech boom? Relax and take it easy?

Well, for Mark Shuttleworth, the choice was easy, writes Ben King.

Google: the Godfather of Open Source?

Filed under
Google

It's well known that Google runs its vast array of servers using a custom version of GNU/Linux. But this is only one aspect of its support for free software. Others include its Summer of Code, now well established as an incubator of both coding talent and projects, and more recently its open source code repository, which offers a useful alternative to Sourceforge.net. Similarly, in porting Picasa to GNU/Linux, Google has made contributions to Wine, while open source projects in Sri Lanka have been the beneficiaries of more direct help, to the tune of $25,000.

But Google is also operating behind the scenes to bolster free software in other ways.

The ODF debate: A real world view

Filed under
OSS

What exactly is meant by document portability? Does it mean that a document created in one application can be viewed using a different application on another operating system? Does it mean that the document can be viewed and edited within another application on the same or another OS platform? Or does it simply mean that you can be sure that the document you create today can be read in the future using proprietary products from the same software vendor?

GP2X: It's all fun and games

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X is an open, Linux-based handheld games console manufactured by Game Park Holdings of South Korea. It has a typical handheld control layout, a good quality backlit screen, built-in stereo speakers, headphone socket, and several connectivity and expansion options. My son is completely taken with the device, and it has won me over too. At £125 (or $190), you're not going to find a less expensive handheld device that can be expanded into a full-blown computer.

SPI board drops Perens

Filed under
OSS

Open source developer and evangelist Bruce Perens says he is not overly concerned about being voted off the board of Software in the Public Interest, the non-profit open source organization he founded a decade ago.

User interfaces should teach, not hide

Filed under
Software

Today, I finally decided that my gVim editor needed a smaller font, and the process of getting it to work right has made me notice a fundamental flaw in the way we think about user interfaces. Essentially it’s just this: GUIs should teach, not obfuscate or hide the underlying mechanism.

Discovering Linux - The Experiences of a Linux Newbie

Filed under
Reviews

The concept of open-source, free software is very appealing. Many of the Linux-distros are very good, but I still haven't found one that fits my needs perfectly. Also, my needs will propably change as I become more aquainted to Linux. At this time, my favourite distro is propably Mandriva One, though it would've been Ubuntu if they had had support for restricted formats.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior Available for download

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior is our next step up from MiniMe. As you know MiniMe comes with just a basic desktop allowing full user customization. Junior comes with a set of pre-selected programs for Web Browsing, Email, Instant Messaging, Blogging, IRC chat, Music, Graphics, Video (additional software required for encrypted DVD playback and proprietary formats), Digital Camera, Games, Ftp, Bit torrent transfer, CD/DVD burning and more.

Community: The "Linux Community"? Not From What I See

Filed under
Linux

Learning about, installing and applying desktop Linux may have saved my business. After a more than disappointing year, I was faced with some tough choices. Running a real estate business is tough, extremely tough in Austin and unbelievably tough if you are an independant.

Phil Thompson Talks About PyQt

Filed under
Interviews

High level languages are increasingly being used in preference to C and C++ in new desktop software. One of these languages best supported in KDE and Qt is Python. To find out about the history and current state of PyQt KDE Dot News talked to Phil Thompson, author and maintainer of the bindings.

Confessions From Studio Dave

Filed under
Hardware

I hate hardware. Sometimes I hate Linux too, but more often I just hate the hardware. Boxes, wires, connectors, keyboards, mice, the works. Some days I just want all of it to disappear. Hmm, did I perhaps have a bad time building my new machine ? That's putting it lightly.

Manage your time with Remind

Filed under
HowTos

One thing most people are bad at is remembering things -- anniversaries, deadlines, schedules. Computers, on the other hand, are very good at tracking things -- so long as you have a way to tell them to do so. Remind, a GPLed calendar and alarm application from Roaring Penguin, is a good way to keep track of your appointments and commitments on your computer so you don't need to worry about keeping them in your head.

Serving large files (>2 GB) with Apache

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever encountered a situation where a file larger than 2 GB (say, a DVD image) doesn't show up in a directory index served by Apache, whereas smaller files from the same directory are shown and served?

n/a

Freespire 1.0 arrives early

Filed under
Linux

Linspire Inc. was going to announce the release of Freespire 1.0 -- its free, Debian-based desktop Linux operating system that combines open-source software with legally-licensed proprietary drivers, codecs, and applications -- next week at LinuxWorld in San Francisco. Instead, this new desktop Linux distribution has emerged early.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux on Servers

Debian, Devuan, and Ubuntu

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2016
    I handled a new LTS sponsor that wanted to see wheezy keep supporting armel and armhf. This was not part of our initial plans (set during last Debconf) and I thus mailed all teams that were impacted if we were to collectively decide that it was OK to support those architectures. While I was hoping to get a clear answer rather quickly, it turns out that we never managed to get an answer to the question from all parties. Instead the discussion drifted on the more general topic of how we handle sponsorship/funding in the LTS project.
  • Initial Planning For Ubuntu 16.10 Today At UOS
    Beyond the announcement that Ubuntu 16.10 won't ship with Mir and Unity 8 by default, many other items were discussed for the Ubuntu 16.10 release due out in October.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Isn't Going To Use Mir / Unity 8 By Default
    Well, another setback for Unity 8 and Mir. Kicking off the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10, it's been confirmed that the Unity 8 desktop and Mir display server will not be the default for the desktop spin. Similar to the current situation with existing Ubuntu releases, Unity 8 and Mir will be available as an opt-in feature for users wanting to upgrade their desktop, but Unity 7 and the faithful X.Org Server is planned to be the default for Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.
  • Devuan Beta Release
    After two years in development, a beta release of the Devuan distro has made it into the world (Devuan is a registered trademark of the Dyne.org foundation). Devuan is a very Debian-ish distro. In fact, it basically is Debian, with one notable absence. Devuan doesn't use systemd. In fact, that's its main claim to fame. Devuan was created to offer an alternative to Debian fans who were alienated by the controversial switch to systemd.

Leftovers: OSS

today's howtos