Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 29 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ok, I’m committed now srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 11:01pm
Story Fedora 14 srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 10:58pm
Story Five Great Games for Linux srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 10:57pm
Story What does Community really mean? (Part 1) srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 8:53pm
Story Speedy 'Wonder Patch' Debuts in New Linux Kernel srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 8:51pm
Story Ubuntu Core going after embedded Linux srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:47pm
Story OpenSUSE 11.4 Review srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:44pm
Story Does Mozilla Have a Speed Problem? srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:42pm
Story 59 Open Source Tools That Can Replace Popular Security Software srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:39pm
Story The GNOME Journal March 2011 srlinuxx 15/03/2011 - 6:37pm

The Perfect Setup - OpenVZ with CentOS 4.4

Filed under
HowTos

This article describes how to prepare a CentOS 4.4 server for OpenVZ virtual machines. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project. OpenVZ is the open-source branch of Virtuozzo, a commercial virtualization solution used by many providers that offer virtual servers.

http://www.howtoforge.com/openvz_centos4.4

The Secret of Firefox's Success

Filed under
Moz/FF

"A lot of people don't even know what a browser is," said Firefox co-creator Blake Ross. "They think that it's the first thing they use on the Internet. They say, 'What do you mean browser, is that Google? Is that Yahoo?' It's hard to get people to switch browsers if they don't understand the concept."

Interview: Mozilla Lighting and OpenOffice.org

Filed under
Interviews

Conducted over the period following OOoCon 2006, where Michael Bemmer, the Engineering Director at Sun Microsystems and in charge of development of OpenOffice.org and StarOffice, presented the OpenOffice.org roadmap, this interview focuses on a particularly interesting element: a Personal Information Manager (PIM) that would work closely with OpenOffice.org.

FSF Compliance Lab Announces New Web Site

Filed under
Web

Yesterday the Free Software Foundation (FSF) Compliance Lab unveiled its updated web site, @ http://www.fsf.org/licensing/. The site aims to help people find the information they need about licenses published by the FSF, such as the GNU General Public License (GPL), and to provide more information about the Lab's work.

Wake Up Morning Post

Filed under
OSS

South China Morning Post reported that use of Open Source was on the rise in China, which is very questionable, especially considering there is yet an Open Source related company to turn a profit. Supposedly, the Morning Post believes this rise will be spurred by the latest collaboration between Microsoft and Novell, which in and of itself is a laugh and shows how little educated the Morning Post is on Open Source issues.

Virtually Speaking: Virtualization Goes Showbiz

Filed under
Software

This week's VMworld, held at the Los Angeles Convention Center attracted close to 100 exhibitors, about 7,000 attendees, and was the epicenter of a host of virtual announcements, from the synergistic to the seemingly incompatible, from OEMs and small ISVs alike.

FSF gNewSense 1.0 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

The Free Software Foundation has pushed out the first stable release of gNewSense. This GNU/Linux distribution is built upon Ubuntu but is modified to only include Free Software. This distribution was started by two Irish FSF developers who wanted to combine the stability of Ubuntu with the addition of software freedom. Like Ubuntu, gNewSense 1.0 works as a LiveCD and can be installed using the Ubiquity graphical installer. The packages included in gNewSense 1.0 are not bleeding edge, with its inclusion of the GNOME 2.14 branch, X.Org 7.0, etc...

Those Screenshots.

PC-BSD Users Review

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

I've been using PC-BSD for approx. 10 Months so I've had enough time to see what life throws at me with it. My first install was 1.0 Release Canadate (RC) 1 and I currently run PC-BSD 1.2 (the current release) on my laptop and have a beta version of 1.3 installed on my desktop for testing. This will cover PC-BSD 1.2 and PC-BSD in general.

Turn Off Laptop LCD Monitor

Filed under
HowTos

In order to save power, I often turn off my LCD monitor when I away from keyboard for long. Bare in mind, blank screen is not consider turn off the monitor, because it still uses backlight.

Frustration: some (Open Source) myths just refuse to die

Filed under
OSS

Some misconceptions refuse to die. And, worst of all, these misconceptions are harming our community and harming us, directly. I’m talking about a two-headed beast:

Allchin backtracks on Vista virus claims

Filed under
Microsoft

FURTHER TO our earlier report regarding Jim Allchin’s remarks which suggested Windows Vista may not need an antivirus system, the man himself has moved to clarify his comments.

Also: Bill Gates, philanthropist ...not

List your installed package versions with apt-show-versions

Filed under
HowTos

apt-show-versions parses the dpkg status file and the APT lists for the installed and available package versions and distribution and shows upgrade options within the specific distribution of the selected package.

Automating Web site and WordPress upgrades with Subversion

Filed under
HowTos

Today, I’ll show you how I automated my Web sites’ WordPress upgrades using assorted and powerful Linux software. You’ll also enjoy an exclusive look at the release process of one of my software products.

100% Free Distributions: Will They Get Linux Anywhere?

Filed under
Linux

‘Completely free’ distributions spring up every once in a while, and they tend to get a substantial amount of coverage from the Linux press. The last one to be added to the FSF’s ever-growing list of free distributions is GNewSense, which is Ubuntu stripped of its proprietary software and given a (bad) makeover. As one might expect, it has received the usual spike of popularity: NewsForge, LWN, etc. What’s wrong with GNewSense?

Book Review: Ubuntu Hacks

Filed under
Reviews

I recently got hold of a very nice book on Ubuntu called Ubuntu Hacks co-authored by three authors - Kyle Rankin, Jonathan Oxer and Bill Childers. Put in a nutshell, this book is a collection of around 100 tips and tricks which the authors choose to call hacks, which explain how to accomplish various tasks in Ubuntu Linux.

Richard Stallman’s shackles: The open source Java acid test?

Filed under
OSS

There are those that feel it doesn't matter whether it's Sun's CDDL license or the Free Software Foundation's GNU General Public License. Either way, they say, GNU/Linux distros will be able to include Java and that's all that matters. But I'm not so sure the issue is as simple as that.

Firefox Bundled With Corel WordPerfect Office X3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Corel Corporation announced that Mozilla Firefox will be bundled with Corel’s new consumer productivity package, Corel WordPerfect Office X3 – Home Edition 2007.

Setting WPA Supplicant for WiFi Access

Filed under
HowTos

Most of the people nowadays don’t use WEP for wifi encryption, most of the wireless router support wpa tkip algorithm for encryption. I read a page which people can actually uses 10 minutes to crack WEP encrytion, which amazing and in the sense that you do not want to use WEP for your WLAN too.

Apples and bananas

Filed under
OSS

While trawling through this week’s normal helter-skelter barrage of free software and open source news items, opinion pieces and analyzing ponderings a couple of pieces caught my eye. After a nice strong cup of coffee and pulling myself together a bit, I examined the articles a little more closely. I discovered that the authors, or originators, of each had, in fact, made a very common mistake while performing free and closed software comparisons that reminded me of the old adage regarding apples and bananas...

Using Linux at Work

Filed under
Linux

I've been programming since a young age, and Linux has always seemed like a natural progression, especially as my development environment is PHP/MySQL/Apache. A while ago, this was all done on a Red Hat installed system, using the “Plesk” web interface. Although I spent quite a few hours at the console sorting out problems, Plesk hid the real nitty gritty from me and I was often just following “How Tos” in order to get things fixed.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

GeckoLinux 421 Plasma and SUSE Hack Week

  • GeckoLinux 421 Plasma review - It ain't no dragon
    I heard a lot of good praise about this little distro. My inbox is flooded with requests to take it for a spin, so I decided, hey, so many people are asking. Let us. The thing is, openSUSE derivatives are far and few in between, but the potential and the appeal are definitely there. Something like CentOS on steroids, the way Stella did once, the same noble way Fuduntu tried to emancipate Fedora. Take a somewhat somber distro and pimpify it into submission. GeckoLinux is based on openSUSE Leap, and I chose the Plasma Static edition. There's also a Rolling version, based on Tumbleweed, but that one never worked for me. The test box for this review is Lenovo G50. But wait! Dedoimedo, did you not recently write in your second rejection report that GeckoLinux had failed to boot? Indeed I did. But the combo of yet another firmware update on the laptop and a fresh new download fixed it, allowing for a DVD boot. Somewhat like the painful but successful Fedora exercise back in the day. Tough start, but let's see what gives.
  • La Mapería
    It is Hack Week at SUSE, and I am working on La Mapería (the map store), a little program to generate beautiful printed maps from OpenStreetMap data.
  • HackWeek XIV @SUSE: Tuesday

From Vista 10 to Linux Mint

  • Microsoft Scared into Changes, 5 Reasons to Ditch
    Following a small claims court judgment against them, Microsoft announced they would be making declining their Windows 10 upgrade easier. Why not just switch to Linux as Daniel Robinson highlighted five reasons you should. My Linux Rig spoke to Christine Hall of FOSS Force about her "Linux rig" today and Bryan Lunduke had some thoughts on Canonical's collaboration myth. Dedoimedo reviewed GeckoLinux 421 and Gary Newell tested Peppermint 7 on his new Lenovo Ideapad.
  • After Multi-Month Tone Deaf Shitshow, Microsoft Finally Lets Users Control Obnoxious Windows 10 Upgrade
    Microsoft's decision to offer Windows 10 as a free upgrade to Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 made sense on its surface. It was a nice freebie for users happy to upgrade, and an effective way to herd customers on older Windows iterations onto the latest platform to help consolidate support expense. But Microsoft's upgrade in practice has seen no shortage of criticism from users annoyed by a total lack of control over the update, and Microsoft's violent tone deafness in response to the complaints. For example a Reddit post from an anti-poaching organization made the rounds earlier this year after the 17 GB automatic Windows 10 update resulted in huge per megabyte charges from their satellite broadband ISP. Microsoft's response to these complaints? Ignore them. As complaints grew, Microsoft finally provided a way to fully disable the forced upgrade, but made sure it involved forcing users to modify the registry, something Microsoft knew full well less technical users wouldn't be comfortable attempting to hurdle. [...] Things have been escalating ever since, often to comedic effect. But this week things changed somewhat with the news that Microsoft has struck a $10,000 settlement with a California woman who sued the company after an ill-timed Windows 10 upgrade brought her office computers to a crawl. The woman took Microsoft to court after support failed to help resolve the issue, a spokesman saying Microsoft halted its appeal of the ruling "to avoid the expense of further litigation."
  • Microsoft pays $10,000 to unwilling Windows 10 updater
  • The Linux Setup - Christine Hall, FOSS Force
    On my main desktop, I use Linux Mint 17.1, Rebecca. My main laptop, a 64-bit machine, is running Mint 17.2 Rafaela. The laptop got updated from Rebecca so I could write a review, but the desktop never got upgraded because it’s a 32-bit machine and would require another download, which I haven’t had the time to do. I have another laptop running Bodhi, which might be my favorite distro, but I can be more productive with Mint.
  • Linux Mint 18 Finally Arrives — Download Cinnamon and MATE Edition ISO Files Here
    The wait for the summer’s hottest Linux distro is over and you can finally download the release version of Linux Mint 18 “Sarah”. Often called the best Linux distribution for desktop PCs, Mint 18 comes loaded with new features and Linux 4.4 LTS Kernel.