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Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 5:53am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 5:48am
Story A quick look at Linux Mint LXDE 11 mcasperson 06/07/2011 - 4:30am
Story Fireworks And Gimp srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 3:57am
Story Ubuntu Linux 'Natty Narwhal' debuts in PHL srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 3:56am
Story FOSS misfits: Rusty Russell's take srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 3:52am
Story There Should Be Only One Distribution! srlinuxx 2 06/07/2011 - 3:25am
Story The ordeal srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:54am
Story Introducing Update Packs in Linux Mint Debian srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:52am
Story AMD's New Open-Source Employees srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:50am

Best of Both: Windows and Ubuntu on a Single PC

Filed under
OS

“Linux rocks!” “no, it’s lame—stick with Windows!” Visit any Web site or online forum where impassioned computer users debate the relative merits of operating systems, and you’ll find endless disagreement. The only way to determine which operating system fits your needs is to run both on the same PC, configured for dual-booting.

Novell: 'No One Can Stop Us From Selling Linux'

Filed under
SUSE

The company comes out swinging after the Free Software Foundation expresses concerns over the Novell/Microsoft partnership. "We're telling customers that no one can stop us from selling SUSE Linux," the spokesman said.

Understanding the Free Software Foundation

Filed under
OSS

Free Software Foundation, or FSF for short, is one of the most controversial information technology related organizations. Some people hate it and some people love it. Neither can change the fact that it has had a tremendous influence on what many today tend to call the "open source" phenomenon which is in fact lying on the very foundations that the FSF represents; Free Software and the Free Software philosophy.

Five ways to use Windows apps in Linux

Filed under
Software

When someone asks me if they can run "Windows Application X" on Linux, the first thing I tell them is to look for an open source alternative. For most Windows applications, there will be a high-quality open source alternative that can meet their needs. The biggest hurdle for non-Linux people is simply knowing that these alternative exist and how to find them.

Book review: The Starfish and the Spider

Filed under
Reviews

Intelligent people can and should disagree. So when we read The Starfish and the Spider, it’s no surprise that we had varied opinions. And when it was time to publish a review, no one could quite agree on which review we should publish. In the spirit of intelligent discourse, here are two reviews of the same book.

Interview with David Korn

Filed under
Interviews

David Korn received his undergraduate degree in mathematics from RPI in 1965 and his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in 1969. After working on computer simulations of transsonic air foils, he switched fields to computer science and became a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories in 1976. He is the creator of the KornShell, a command language for the UNIX environment, as well as UWIN, an X-Open library for Windows NT and Windows 95. In 1984, he was inducted as a Bell Labs fellow. He currently works for AT&T Research in Florham Park, NJ and graciously agreed to take a few moments and answer a few questions for our readers.

Gentlemen, start your engines!

Filed under
Gaming

Those of you that are fans of car racing will probably recognize this post's title as the famous phrase that gives the official start to the Indianapolis 500. If it happens that you are a fan of both car racing and free software, you may well be interested in TORCS (The Open Racing Cars Simulator).

Get Involved! Second openSUSE community meeting 2007-02-11

Filed under
SUSE

This is the second ever community meeting taking place, and it is run by
openSUSE Community members who are not employed by Novell/SUSE.

Foresight Is a Linux Distro to Watch

Filed under
Linux

It seems as if a new Linux-based operating system is born every day, with each facing the challenge of justifying its existence in a field that's already rather crowded with mature Linux distributions boasting active user bases and organized bodies to back them. But one relatively young Linux distribution worth keeping an eye on is Foresight Linux.

Free/Open Source Software recommended for use in developing countries

Filed under
OSS

Over 130 IT professionals of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) from more than 27 countries had gathered at Sukabumi, Indonesia for a nine-day Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) training camp called "ASIA SOURCE II." The key objective was to promote the use of FOSS for social and economic development and to build a network of FOSS practitioners and trainers with Asia.

An approach to parental control for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Every day more and more parents face the need to make the decision on whether allow their children to access the internet and its extensive resources to raise better informed and connected persons or surrender to equally extensive and invasive contents that just don’t fit their parenting ways and keep them away of a computer.

Is Novell losing Linux? No, it's just bad reporting

Filed under
OS

Commentary: Blame Jim Finkle at Reuters, I suppose. His story is the one that started this large dung-ball of misinformation rolling around the Internet. You know the one, about Novell losing the right to distribute Linux.

The hunt for a Linux PC

Filed under
Linux

Where can the average South African consumer get their hands on a new PC loaded with Linux instead of Windows? Not a lot of places, as it turns out.

One man can end the Microsoft-Linux feud

Filed under
OS

Bill Gates. And I think he will. I don't think it's a coincidence, or a mere marketing choice, that caused Gates to pop up as the public face of the Windows Vista launch last week, after publicly retiring six months earlier.

Preview of Beryl 0.2.0

Filed under
Software

Beryl is simply creating some of the most exciting and innovative work on any computing platform. Amazingly, Beryl came into existence only 6 months or so ago. The Beryl project orginally forked from the Compiz 3d desktop group around September of 2006. At the time I had a hard time understanding why we needed another 3d desktop project, but now that I have had a chance to watch Beryl develop, their decision makes a whole lot of sense.

Is E-Commerce Ready for Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Thirty-seven percent of North American enterprises that sell products or services online will purchase a new e-commerce platform, according to Forrester Research. The options available to them include a considerable amount of open source applications. However, while open source is clearly making an impact in the e-commerce space, it is not yet fully integrated.

Free Software Magazine Issue 16

Filed under
OSS

Highlights:

  • Paper is dead - has PDF followed suit?
  • Freeing an old game
  • The free Tron Universe—Armagetron
  • The lazy user’s guide to OpenOffice.org Writer
  • Vega Strike
  • Configuring a Linux home internet gateway
  • A media center based on GNU/Linux

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 188

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Analysis: Mandriva - a slow financial demise?

  • News: Fedora's forgettable Test1 release, Mandriva adds non-free repository, Ubuntu defers Beryl plans, interview with Red Hat's Matthew Szulik, Adriane Knoppix
  • Released last week: DragonFly BSD 1.8, Annvix 2.0

  • Donations: GQview and Kaffeine receive US$500
  • New additions: NimbleX, Trisquel GNU/Linux
  • New distributions: CowMet, CDriveBack
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu Live Conference

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Live conference is coming to Portland, Oregon (US) between July 22 and July 24, 2007. The Ubuntu Live conference will coincide with the O’Reilly 2007 Open Source Convention (OSCON). The call for participation for Ubuntu Live is now open until February 14.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Beryl + Ubuntu = Beauty

  • Secure your Ubuntu Desktop Using Firestarter Firewall
  • Ubuntu Networking Configuration Using Command Line
  • Change Font Colour in Gnome Panels
  • Command line media editing
  • Why do we sudo in Ubuntu, and who is Charlie Root?

  • Gumstick Gentoo
  • How To Make Your Ubuntu Speak
  • Unattended SSH login / public key authorization / ssh automatic login
  • VirtualBox On FC6 / CentOS 4 / OpenSuSE 10.2
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More in Tux Machines

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle

KDE and Qt

GNOME News

  • Fresh From the Oven: GNOME Pie 0.6.9 Released
    For a slice of something this weekend you might want to check out the latest update to GNOME Pie, the circular app launcher for Linux desktops.
  • GUADEC 2016 and the Butterfly Effect
  • GUADEC 2016 Notes
    I’m back from GUADEC and wanted to share a few thoughts on the conference itself and the post-conference hackfest days. All the talks including the opening and closing sessions and the GNOME Foundation AGM are available online. Big thanks goes to the organization team for making this possible.

Security News

  • Thursday's security updates
  • Priorities in security
  • How Core Infrastructure Initiative Aims to Secure the Internet
    In the aftermath of the Heartbleed vulnerability's emergence in 2014, the Linux Foundation created the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII)to help prevent that type of issue from recurring. Two years later, the Linux Foundation has tasked its newly minted CTO, Nicko van Someren, to help lead the effort and push it forward. CII has multiple efforts under way already to help improve open-source security. Those efforts include directly funding developers to work on security, a badging program that promotes security practices and an audit of code to help identify vulnerable code bases that might need help. In a video interview with eWEEKat the LinuxCon conference here, Van Someren detailed why he joined the Linux Foundation and what he hopes to achieve.
  • Certificate Authority Gave Out Certs For GitHub To Someone Who Just Had A GitHub Account
    For many years now, we've talked about the many different problems today's web security system has based on the model of security certificates issued by Certificate Authorities. All you need is a bad Certificate Authority be trusted and a lot of bad stuff can happen. And it appears we've got yet another example. A message on Mozilla's security policy mailing list notes that a free certificate authority named WoSign appeared to be doing some pretty bad stuff, including handing out certificates for a base domain if someone merely had control over a subdomain. This was discovered by accident, but then tested on GitHub... and it worked.