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Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu, see you in October 2012 srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 9:29pm
Story The Big, Bad Browser Quiz srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:37pm
Story Canonical Again Pushes Desktop Ubuntu for the Enterprise srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:34pm
Story Intel pulls MeeGo plug? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:32pm
Story We won and we didn't notice srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:30pm
Story New features in ubuntu 11.10 srlinuxx 3 02/09/2011 - 5:54pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 7:11am
Story Why is the packaging process so broken?!? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:39am
Story Kernel.org breach does not reflect well on admins srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:36am
Story SUSE Loses Another Former RadeonHD Developer srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:35am

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Thinking about trying Linux?

Filed under
Linux

You have probably heard about this thing called Linux. Everybody seems to be arguing over it. Is it better than Windows or faster or cheaper. Some say it doesn't support anything while others say it supports more than windows. Your curiosity is aroused and you wonder if you should give linux a try before parting with a few hundred dollars for the latest version of windows.

Mark Shuttleworth: A very good start

Filed under
OSS

I’m very impressed with the results of the early work being done at the new Linux Foundation, which is OSDL+FSG with a leaner focus on getting things done.

MAYA 8.5

Filed under
Software
Reviews

This upgrade follows hot on the heels of Maya 8, and adds native compatibility with Intel Macs. However, it’s more than just a compatibility fix – the update adds a lot of new features, too, particularly in the field of simulations.

New advances are based around a unified simulation framework called Maya Nucleus. This is a linked particle system that allows simultaneous interactive simulations acting on a variety of dynamic objects. All of your simulations can affect each other and can be affected by the same forces and constraints, such as wind and gravity.

OpenSuse 10.2 Review

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I just got finished installing OpenSuSE 10.2 on my Linux workstation. It had been at 10.0. Overall, it is very painless. It's a lot easier than installing Windows.

Open Source and You

Filed under
OSS

No one would buy a car with the hood welded shut, but that is essentially what commercial software is. However, since computing began, some software has been distributed in such a way that users can change or repair it by modifying its source code--the step-by-step instructions that the computer executes when the software runs. Software distributed under a license that allows a programmer to modify the source code and freely distribute an improved version of it is called open source.

Crontab Configuration, OpenSUSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

At some point several years ago, SUSE and Redhat migrated to new multi-file and sub-directory approaches (search anacron) for their system crontabs. A helpful comment posted to my 2 March entry motivated me to learn how these are set up. Here’s how openSUSE 10.2 structures its cron configuration and provides the means of controlling it:

* YaST, System, sysconfig editor, cron - edits various configuration parameters stored in the /etc/sysconfig/cron file (this file can also be edited directly).
* YaST, System, System Services - turn the cron service on/off here.

Join the KDE Event Coordination Task Force now!

Filed under
KDE

KDE is visiting a lot of events on a yearly basis. In most cases, the booth is staffed by volunteers. A successful event attendance depends on a number of factors, if those aren't considered, it might end in frustrated, or even burnt out contributors. But getting it right is not just about "went good / bad", there are various shades of grey. Having a look at past events, the most important factors seem to be in two groups, general considerations and planning and per-event planning.

Zabbix: State-of-the-art network monitoring

Filed under
Software

I have used BigBrother and Nagios for a long time to troubleshoot network problems, and I was happy with them -- until Zabbix came along. Zabbix is an enterprise-class open source distributed monitoring solution for servers, network services, and network devices. It's easier to use and provides more functionality than Nagios or BigBrother.

Freeing an old game - Relicensing UMoria

Filed under
Gaming

People are often attracted to games before they are attracted to the free software movement. This means that many free software enthusiasts are addicted to non-free games. This is what turns some people to free software—the inability to see how a game works, or the inability to legally share it with friends.

Writing shell scripts which execute locally or remotely

Filed under
HowTos

There are a lot of times when it is useful to have a single shell script run both upon the local host, and also upon remote hosts. Here we'll show a simple trick which allows you to accomplish this easily.

To execute shell scripts remotely the most obvious approach is to copy it there, with scp, and then use ssh to actually execute it. This is similar to running simple commands remotely using ssh directly:

skx@mine:~$ ssh yours uptime
07:12:25 up 3 days, 18:15, 0 users, load average: 0.00, 0.00, 0.08
skx@mine:~$

With that in mind the solution becomes:

Network File System (NFS) Server and Client Configuration in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

NFS was developed at a time when we weren’t able to share our drives like we are able to today - in the Windows environment. It offers the ability to share the hard disk space of a big server with many smaller clients. Again, this is a client/server environment. While this seems like a standard service to offer, it was not always like this. In the past, clients and servers were unable to share their disk space.

Why Dell Is Really Saying No to Linux

By now, many of you may be wondering why Dell is passing up such a great niche market by not offering Linux as an alternative OS option to Windows. We have talked about how this would only prove to benefit a company like Dell, but we have also acknowledged the fact that it will likely never happen.

OpenOffice.org Issues an Invitation to Dell Computer Corporation

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org urges Dell's CEO to respond to customer demand and bundle
http://www.tuxmachines.org/node/add/story
OpenOffice.org's free software alternative to Microsoft Office with Dell's computers

One laptop per child

Filed under
Hardware

For some time, I've been aware of online discussions going on about an innovative project to build cheap laptop computers to be given to kids in developing countries.

The goal was to build a sub-$100 (about R740) laptop computer which could not only be used by children to learn computing skills, but to assist them with completing their other schoolwork as well.

I reserved judgement on the idea but it now seems as if it really is going to fly, with numbers of test machines having been delivered to communities around the world and large scale production due to start later in the year.

Book Review: IPCOP Firewalls - Closing borders with Open Source

Filed under
Reviews

IPCop is a GPLed firewall solution targeted at Small Office/Home Office network. It is favored by many for its ease of configuration and setup and its support for a variety of features that you would expect to have in a modern firewall. IPCop is famed for letting users setup a sophisticated firewall for ones network without ever having to write an iptables rule themselves.

Are you an open source user or joiner?

Filed under
OSS

In my previous column, I touched on the issue of what constitutes an open-source vendor. Ask Andy Astor that question, and his answer is a shrug. "Honestly," he says, "who cares?" To Astor, there are really two broad categories of companies with respect to their relationship to open-source code. Some are users. Others are joiners.

An open letter: from a consumer to the distributions

Filed under
Linux

My name is Adam Posey, I'm a resident of Elkins, West Virginia and a GNU/Linux user. I do not run a server nor I do not own a business. What I do have is considerable influence over the buying decisions of other people around me because I am knowledgeable in technology. I have grown very weary of the current state of Linux for the home user.

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

Filed under
Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

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Kernel Backports and Graphics

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  • What’s New in Wayland and Weston 1.12?
    The Wayland core protocol documentation has received numerous refinements to improve its clarity and consistency. Along with this, many blank areas of the protocol documentation have been fleshed out. A new wl_display_add_protocol logger API provides a new, interactive way to debug requests; along with this are new APIs for examining clients and their resources. This is analogous to using WAYLAND_DEBUG=1, but more powerful since it allows run time review of log data such as through a UI view. There have been improvements to how the protocol XML scanner handles version identification in protocol headers. This enables better detection and fallback handling when compositors and clients support differt versions of their protocols.
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IBM Claims “New Linux Based Power System Server Kicks Butt

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016