Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 22 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: KDE and GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:27pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 to Get Locally Integrated Menus by Default Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:23pm
Story Cinnamon 2.6 brings panels to multiple monitors Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 11:14pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 7:44pm
Story Ubuntu Kylin 14.04.2 LTS Is Out for Chinese Users with Linux Kernel 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 5:33pm
Story pNFS Block Server Support Is Coming To Linux 4.0 (3.20) Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 4:31pm
Story 7.5-TEST-1 Release Notes Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 4:25pm
Story AntiX Linux: A Brief Review Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 9:03am
Story GNOME 3.16 Beta Brings Wayland-Based Log-in Screen Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 9:00am
Story My Four-Year-Old Daughter Rejected Windows 10 Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2015 - 8:57am

Interview with Daniel Holbach, Ubuntu Community Developer

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

oneopensource.it: Daniel Holbach works for Canonical where is involved in the Ubuntu Community, taking care the relationship with the MOTU team, the Ubuntu developers. Daniel gave us an interview where he speaks about his own work.

Living free with Linux: 2 weeks without Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com: It's one of those perennial age-old battles that can never be resolved. Coke or Pepsi? Chocolate or vanilla? Linux or Windows?

Linux CD Ripping Utilities

Filed under
Software

thelinuxblog.com: CD Ripping with Linux doesn’t have to be the labor intensive task that it once was. No longer do we have the days of writing a hundred character command to rip a CD with the perfect options. Here are some utilities aimed at making your life of ripping your collection of CD’s to a digital format you can actually use.

Calls for open source government

Filed under
OSS

news.bbc.co.uk: The secret to a more secure and cost effective government is through open source technologies and products. The claim comes from Scott McNealy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Mobile Internet Devices (MIDs): Still Coming Soon?

  • The Case for Open Source Development, a Personal Case Study
  • The Netbook is dead. Long live the notebook!
  • Linux Recording With the MobilePre
  • FLOSS Weekly 52: Casey Reas and Ben Fry on Processing.org
  • The SFLS Episode 0x05: Eben Moglen on Origins of Copyright and Patents
  • Eric Raymond on Hacking, Open Source, and the Cathedral and the Bazaar
  • Comux 000100
  • Auto-launching Programs on Ubuntu Startup
  • Microsoft donates code to Apache Stonehenge project
  • Advantages of IPv6 - The Next Generation Internet
  • Nokia Using Drupal
  • Industrial Linux groups merge
  • Multi-Pointer X Support For GTK+
  • Are you a Linux?
  • about:mozilla Jan 20
  • Back to Gentoo

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Some useful Linux bash tricks

  • Recover Deleted Files Using Linux
  • Making changes to an OpenOffice.org chart in Draw
  • Create a Sound File from a Text File
  • You pushd me again and I will popd you one
  • How To Install And Configure Cairo Dock In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Remotely monitor servers with the Nagios check_by_ssh plugin
  • Using vi to Encrypt Text Files
  • Shared Terminal Sessions over SSH

Open-source chief optimistic about proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The incoming president of an alliance of open-source companies hopes he can persuade big-name proprietary ISVs to join rivals in his group to further interoperability.

"Green" netbook boasts five-hour battery life

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: CherryPal announced an Atom-based "Bing" netbook that runs Linux or Windows XP, and offers a claimed five hours of battery life. The company also announced an upgraded version of its Linux-based nettop, the CherryPal C114, and launched a "Green Maraschino" open-source Linux distribution supporting the Bing.

The Wide Gulf: Techies and Ordinary Users

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I seriously doubt any of my clients will ever be “Linux newbies” for the simple reason too many Linux people assume “newbie” means someone who will become one of the techies.

Open source developers ride the cloud

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Nearly half of developers working on open source projects plan to offer applications as Web services offerings using cloud providers, according to results of an Evans Data open source development survey being released on Tuesday.

DVCS Round-Up: One System to Rule Them All?--Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxfoundation.org: In this review, we will take a look at six different revision control systems. Namely these are git, Mercurial, darcs, Monotone, Bazaar (which is used by the Ubuntu project), and SVK (which is based upon Subversion). All six systems are distributed, and we will take a look at the different workflows supported (or enforced) by them.

Mozilla Wants to Start Watching Where You Click

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.wired.com: In an effort to better understand how people use the web, Mozilla has launched a new data gathering project for usability studies called Test Pilot. It's still just a concept, but as an aggregation model, it shows great promise.

Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

thestreet.com: There are a number of netbooks on the market, but I wanted to get my hands on one loaded with the Linux operating system, Ubuntu.

Netbooks Poised to Be the New OS Battleground?

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In 2009, it won’t be the “year of the desktop” for any operating system–instead, the coveted trophy seems to be “year of the netbook.”

Apple, Linux Miss Golden Opportunity to Snag Desktop Market Share

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: Top-dog OS on the enterprise desktop? Linux and Apple had a golden chance to grab that title, and boy did they blow it!

Like the Pre? Wait Until It's Actually Finished

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

internetnews.com: Palm is taking a page from Apple's iPhone strategy book when it comes to keeping things quiet regarding its newly-announced Pre smartphone and webOS mobile platform.

KDE Voted Free Software Project of the Year

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Linux Format magazine has unveiled its annual Reader Awards for 2008 and KDE won a 'landslide' victory in the category of Free Software Project of the year in recognition of the 'incredible' work done with KDE 4.

Follow up : On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

linux-wizard.net: Adam on his latest blog named On Linux security is 100% right when he's saying that Linux users should not have a false sense of security and impunity when using Linux. The only ways to be protected against theses kinds of issues are:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available (PR)

  • Enterprise Linux 5.2 to 5.3 risk report
  • Red Hat revs Enterprise Linux distro
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3
  • Virtualization gets a boost in RHEL 5.3

Looking for Linux, but sold out

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.the451group: I had an interesting time scouring the Internet for the right netbook for my wife. The biggest hangup was trying to find an Acer Aspire One netbook with Linux on it. It’s not that they aren’t made by the manufacturer, it’s that all the Linux netbooks seem to be getting gobbled up.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Server/OSS: Data Storage, OpenStack, Nextcloud, Puppet

  • Open Source Storage: 64 Applications for Data Storage
    As data storage needs continue to grow and many organizations move toward software-defined infrastructure, more enterprises are using open source software to meet some of their storage needs. Projects like Hadoop, Ceph, Gluster and others have become very common at large enterprises. Home users and small businesses can also benefit from open source storage software. These applications can make it possible to set up your own NAS or SAN device using industry-standard hardware without paying the high prices vendors charge for dedicated storage appliances. Open source software also offers users the option to set up a cloud storage solution where they have control over security and privacy, and it can also offer affordable options for backup and recovery.
  • OpenStack Moves Beyond the Cloud to Open Infrastructure
    The OpenStack Summit got underway on May 21, with a strong emphasis on the broader open-source cloud community beyond just the OpenStack cloud platform itself. At the summit, the OpenStack Foundation announced that it was making its open-source Zuul continuous development, continuous integration (CI/CD) technology a new top level standalone project. Zuul has been the underlying DevOps CI/CD system that has been used for the past six years, to develop and test the OpenStack cloud platform.
  • OpenStack makes Zuul continuous delivery tool its second indie project
    The OpenStack Foundation has launched its Zuul continuous delivery and integration tool as a discrete project. Zuul is therefore Foundation’s second project other than OpenStack itself. The first was Kata Containers. Making Zuul a standalone effort therefore advance’s the Foundation’s ambition to become a bit like the Linux and Apache Foundations, by nurturing multiple open source projects.
  • OpenStack spins out its Zuul open source CI/CD platform
    There are few open-source projects as complex as OpenStack, which essentially provides large companies with all the tools to run the equivalent of the core AWS services in their own data centers. To build OpenStack’s various systems the team also had to develop some of its own DevOps tools, and, in 2012, that meant developing Zuul, an open-source continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) platform. Now, with the release of Zuul v3, the team decided to decouple Zuul from OpenStack and run it as an independent project. It’s not quite leaving the OpenStack ecosystem, though, as it will still be hosted by the OpenStack Foundation.
  • Nextcloud 13: How to Get Started and Why You Should
    In its simplest form, the Nextcloud server is "just" a personal, free software alternative to services like Dropbox or iCloud. You can set it up so your files are always accessible via the internet, from wherever you are, and share them with your friends. However, Nextcloud can do so much more. In this article, I first describe what the Nextcloud server is and how to install and set it up on GNU/Linux systems. Then I explain how to configure the optional Nextcloud features, which may be the first steps toward making Nextcloud the shell of a complete replacement for many proprietary platforms existing today, such as Dropbox, Facebook and Skype.
  • Why use Puppet for automation and orchestration
    Puppet the company bills Puppet the automation tool as the de facto standard for automating the delivery and ongoing operation of hybrid infrastructure. That was certainly true at one time: Puppet not only goes back to 2005, but also currently claims 40,000 organizations worldwide as users, including 75 percent of the Fortune 100. While Puppet is still a very strong product and has increased its speed and capabilities over the years, its competitors, in particular Chef, have narrowed the gap. As you might expect from the doyenne of the IT automation space, Puppet has a very large collection of modules, and covers the gamut from CI/CD to cloud-native infrastructure, though much of that functionality is provided through additional products. While Puppet is primarily a model-based system with agents, it supports push operations with Puppet Tasks. Puppet Enterprise is even available as a service on Amazon.

today's howtos

Oregan unveils new middleware for Linux STBs and Android TV

Oregan Networks, a provider of digital TV software services, has announced the launch of a new set-top box client middleware product for pay-TV operators called SparQ. The software is designed to work on the most challenging and resource-limited STB platforms in the field, making it feasible to introduce new OTT content services and applications on customer devices that were deployed as part of the first wave of IPTV and hybrid broadcast deployments. Read more

KDE Development Updates

  • Revisiting my talk at FOSSASIA summit, 2018
    Earlier this year, I had the chance to speak about one of KDE community’s cool projects that is helpding developers erase the line between desktop and mobile/tablet UI’s with ease. I’m referring to the Kirigami UI framework – a set of QtQuick components targetted at the mobile as well as desktop platforms. This is particularly important to KDE and a lot of projects are now migrating towards a Kirigami UI, particularly keeping in mind the ability to run the applications on the Plasma Mobile.
  • This Week in KDE, Part 2 : OYLG, Workspace KCM, Single/Double Click
    Last weekend, I went to İstanbul to attend Özgür Yazılım ve Linux Günleri (Free Software and Linux Days 2018) to represent LibreOffice. We had 3 presentations during the event about LibreOffice Development and The Open Document Format. We had booth setup with stickers, flyers, roll-up etc. These were all thanks to The Document Foundation’s supports! You can find detailed information about the event from here : https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Events/2018/OYLG2018
  • Watching the Detectives
    For instance, Kevin Ottens has been writing about understanding the KDE community by the “green blobs” method, showing who is active when. Lays Rodrigues has written about using Gource to show Plasma growing up. Nate Graham describes the goings-on in the KDE community nearly every week. Those are, roughly: a metric-, a visual-, and a story-based approach to understanding the community, over different timescales. But understanding of a system doesn’t come from a single dimension, from a single axis of measurement. It comes from mixing up the different views to look the system as a whole.
  • Managing cooking recipes
    I like to cook. And sometimes store my recipes. Over the years I have tried KRecipes, kept my recipes in BasKet notes, in KJots notes, in more or less random word processor documents. I liked the free form entering recipes in various notes applications and word processor documents, but I lacked some kind of indexing them. What I wanted was free-ish text for writing recipes, and some thing that could help me find them by tags I give them. By Title. By how I organize them. And maybe by Ingredient if I don’t know how to get rid of the soon-to-be-bad in my refridgerator.