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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wine 1.7.35 Released, How To Install On Ubuntu/Debian/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 24/01/2015 - 6:05pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 3:17pm
Story Intel Has A Few More Graphics Changes For The Linux 3.20 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 11:31am
Story Oracle Goes After Cisco UCS, with the 'Whole Megillah' Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 10:44am
Story Zenwalk and Chakra Reviews, Another 32-Bit Voice Roy Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 10:38am
Blog entry PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora Mohd Sohail 24/01/2015 - 10:30am
Story PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora Mohd Sohail 24/01/2015 - 4:24am
Story DragonFlyBSD 4.0.3 Released Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:27am
Story Open-Xchange Partners with ExtendASP on Open Source SaaS Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:20am
Story Zenwalk Linux - A Walk on the Quirky Side Rianne Schestowitz 24/01/2015 - 2:10am

Q&A with Joe Brockmeier at Novell

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

neowin.net: If you read the Linux section of the Neowin forums recently, you will know that Neowin was recently given the opportunity for a Q&A session with Joe Brockmeier.

Also: Open Source Matures w/ Joe Brockmeier

Play Linux Games From A Live DVD

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: When it comes to gaming in Linux, one of the most frequently faced problems is the sourcing of the game code then compiling and installing them on your machine. Now, without worrying you about any of the technical details, you can play your favorite Linux game from a Live DVD.

Ubuntu & Songbird, sitting in a tree…..

Filed under
Ubuntu

whacked.net: I’ve spent the past two days down in Mountain View. Yesterday I spent some time at the Ubuntu Developer Summit meeting with the great guys from the Ubuntu Mozilla-team to see about integrating Songbird into Ubuntu.

Managing your movie collection with Griffith

Filed under
Software

linux.com: For a long time, I recorded a basic list of all the backups I made of my movie collection in a scruffy notebook. In due time, I found that relying on a simple piece of paper was wishful thinking. I then endured the laborious process of migrating my list to a spreadsheet on my computer -- but that still wasn't enough. Eventually I found Griffith, a movie collection manager, and was pleasantly surprised to discover what it was capable of.

Archlinux - More Trouble than It’s Worth?

Filed under
Linux

bitburners.com: This is a review-like story about my experiences with the Archlinux Linux distribution. I’ve been using Arch for half an year now and I’ve been quite impressed with it.

Fear Not the Linux Command Line!

Filed under
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: Most recent converts to Linux spend most of their time in the GUI -- the graphical desktop (whether Gnome, or KDE, or XFCE, or some other interface) that's made to look and act somewhat like Windows and Mac. But if you spend all your time in the GUI, you're missing out.

OpenOffice.org 3

Filed under
OOo

linuxworld.com (MacWorld): OpenOffice.org is a powerful productivity suite--including tools for word processing, spreadsheets, slideshows and more--with one major additional feature: it's free.

Jack’s best linux tips and features

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Jack regularly moonlights in the 10 Things blog and occasionally even infiltrates the Windows blog! It’s time to round up some of his Linux-related articles that you might have missed.

How KDE and Kubuntu lost a devotee

Filed under
KDE

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

When bugtracking systems are being fenced

Filed under
Software

dag.wieers.com/blog: Today, in my quest for a media center solution that suits me, I started fixing some issues with running Elisa on CentOS 5. The Elisa project is using Launchpad for bugtracking and project management and so I created an account to send a few patches.

Two New Linux Beta Distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/community/blog: If you're interested in new Linux distributions, here are a couple of new Betas that I have taken a quick look at:

OpenSolaris 2008.11: Its Time Is Coming

Filed under
OS

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I was attracted to OpenSolaris 2008.11 in the first place by a couple of other internet articles. Solaris is a Unix-based operating system introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1992 as the successor to SunOS, and OpenSolaris is its Open Source spin-off.

Thoughts on Linux migration

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
  • Thoughts on Linux migration

  • Why I Switched From Ubuntu To Vista
  • Beranger Sucks!

Sabayon Recruiting Beta Team Testers

Filed under
Linux

planet.sabayonlinux: Once again Sabayon Linux is looking to grow. We are looking for a small group of 30 people or so to do beta testing. We’ll have a mailing list and irc room setup for the group to use.

Debian Lenny (5.0) Release Date

Filed under
Linux

blogs.koolwal.net: If you are wondering, like me, what happened to the Debian’s upcoming release a.k.a Lenny/5.0, here is a short story for you curious types.

Unboxing the CherryPal: It’s alive!

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

tgdaily.com: After much skepticism due to poor company communication, I can admit I was extremely pleased to have the small CherryPal box hit my doorstep. So, I can confirm that the CherryPal does exist, well sorta.

Installing ubuntu-system-panel (USP) On Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

ubuntu-system-panel is a simple launcher for the GNOME desktop, providing easy access to Places, Applications and common configuration items for your computer. This guide shows how to install and configure it on an Ubuntu 8.10 desktop.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE: Linux for the Lazy

  • Why Geeks Love Drupal
  • Chrome, Firefox, IE Reveal no Major Bugs
  • Work Imitates Life On Linux - Some Surrealism For A Change
  • Don't forget to Smolt
  • 3D desktop revealed in Apple patent filing
  • HP gives SUSE Linux a try: The world yawns in disbelief
  • The Evolution of a Programmer
  • On the adoption of CPAL and the AGPLv3
  • Boekenbeurs using Drupal
  • Compiling A Debian Kernel
  • Review: Firefox 3.1 Beta 2 adds speed and privacy
  • More Pre-installs, More Market Share
  • Spending a Day with Ubuntu
  • OR operator for Grep
  • UDS developer interviews
  • Brazil Seeks 150,000 GNU/Linux Notebooks for 300 Schools

OpenSolaris now on Toshiba laptops

Filed under
OS

zdnet.com.au: Sun has reached an agreement with Toshiba to pre-install the OpenSolaris operating system on Toshiba laptops. The laptops will be available in the US from early 2009.

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More in Tux Machines

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures. SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments. Read more Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module