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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2015 - 1:54am
Story New Manjaro Linux Update Brings LUKS Encryption, Firefox 37.0.1, Linux Kernel 3.19.3 Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2015 - 1:43am
Story First success in Calligra’s 2nd port to Qt5 & KF5 Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2015 - 1:36am
Story Dell will sell a bigger version of its flagship Android tablet Rianne Schestowitz 09/04/2015 - 1:14am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:53pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:53pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:53pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:51pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:49pm
Story NCR Launches Android-Based Thin Client ATMs Rianne Schestowitz 08/04/2015 - 8:45pm

'Open source' vendors push advantage

Filed under
OSS

btobonline.com: Ready to get jealous? How would you like to work in an industry that benefits from economic downturns and for companies that see revenue, customer acquisition and budgets grow during these toughest of times?

Why Microsoft has chosen to go after Linux now

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Legal

itwire.com: A couple of months back, at Australia's national Linux conference, a young Microsoft employee sat down with me and discussed ways in which Microsoft has contributed to open source.

Man oh Man oh Mono

Filed under
Microsoft

thelinuxlink.net/blog: A few weeks ago I posted how I was considering a new look at Mono and .net technology. I mean I have heard the claims by the other side about patent FUD. So cast aside litigation fears for using .net technology, after all it is an open standard right?

Living free with Linux: Round 2

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: Last month, in "Living free with Linux: 2 weeks without Windows," I wrote about what life was like for a longtime Windows user trying to live with Linux. One of the main drawbacks: The difficulties I encountered when installing or updating software.

Good Linux Users Don’t Talk About Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

pcmech.com: Is it all too typical on the internet to hear a Linux user go full-on zealot style and say, "YEAH! I use Linux! F**k Microsoft! You people are sheeple! Down with the status quo!" Blah, blah, blah, frickin’ blah.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu 9.10 sees the cloud above the trees

  • Linpus Linux Lite OS caught on video
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 5 Isn’t Ready for Primetime, Yet
  • Blueprint for Competing with Proprietary Software
  • Can TouchBook Revitalize Linux Netbooks?
  • Audio Production Hardware At Studio Dave
  • Linux Fedora KDE 10: First Look
  • SCO What? It's Patently over for Copyright
  • You should refuse stable
  • It's Time to Cash In on Firefox
  • Why Sugar's Future Looks Sweet: User Feedback
  • Sabayon 4.1 Gnome Preview
  • Forthcoming VDR Release To Support VDPAU
  • Trading places: IBM and Microsoft on open source
  • Intuitive packaging is vital to Gentoo
  • The best racing game ever runs on Linux
  • Hire Open Source Developers -- or Partner With Them?
  • The Open Source Community, the Worldwide Academy of Programming, Does Not Discriminate
  • Linux Foundation’s “We’re Linux” Contest Enters Final Week
  • Sneak Preview of Adobe Reader 9.x on Linux and Solaris x86
  • K is for Kuki and it might be good enough for your Aspire One
  • Ounce Labs: Open Source Software Is Perfectly Secure
  • News from Pardus

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto Make an MPEG Picture Slideshow with digiKam in Ubuntu

  • Gentoo : A complete and utter retards guide to installing
  • 6 Ubuntu Package Management tips for the Fedora User
  • Jaunty 64-bit and Eclipse
  • Move /home to it’s own partition
  • The Great KDE Font Mystery
  • Simple guide to Sound Solutions for Ubuntu Users
  • Upgrading Ubuntu to the Cutting Edge
  • iopp: howto get i/o information per process
  • Remove Compiz from Ubuntu
  • Setting up SSHFS

Linux Performance: Different Distributions, Very Different Results

Filed under
Linux

oreilly.com: When I write reviews of various Linux distributions and describe differences in performance I almost invariably get a comment to the effect that all Linux distros are essentially the same: running the same kernel, the same libraries, the same filesystems. Performance should be essentially the same, right?

Netbooks open door to Windows alternatives

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: As netbooks surge in popularity, open-source Linux-based operating systems have established a toehold on the low-cost, stripped-down computers as an alternative to Microsoft Corp's Windows.

Behind Red Hat's Consistency: A Surprising Concentration on Investing

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com/blog: Savio Rodrigues is out with a very interesting post on Red Hat's financial consistency. Long story short, he concludes that over the past two years a whopping--borderline shocking--48 percent of Red Hat's income before taxes is classified as "Other Income."

Dvorak Likes Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcmag.com: Almost all the newest hardware coming out has Linux support. The critical mass has been reached, and it's time everyone tried Ubuntu.

Also: Microsoft's business model is done

How should we spread the Linux word?

Filed under
Linux

toolbox.com/blogs: Linux is great, it's fantastic, it's superkalafragilisticexpealidocious. It's everything you ever dreamed about. It's so good it invented sliced bread. If you tell a non-Linux person this they will most probably say "What you talking about Willis?"

The Good, The Bad And The Open

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: A quote attributed to various sources goes as follows: "Technology is neither good nor bad, nor is it neutral." It takes the shape you give to it, but it will always take one shape or another. The same could be said of open source, and ought to be.

System76 Serval Professional Notebook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

phoronix.com: Finding a laptop that can run Linux is no longer much of a challenge. In this review we are looking at the System76 Serval Professional notebook.

Out of the Park

Filed under
Gaming

tuxradar.com: If baseball is what gets you cooking on gas, prepare to say goodbye to your family, become a recluse, and thrive on a world of management decisions and statistics: Out of the Park 9 is available on Linux.

Dream Linux 3.5 - Results and Summary

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet: I've had a few days now to try out Dream Linux on all of my laptops, and the results are interesting, if mixed:

Interview: Steve McIntyre of Debian

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

h-online.com: Steve McIntyre, Debian Project Leader talks about his work with the free open source Linux distribution.

One Ubuntu To Rule Them All

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: We have all seen Ubuntu emerge as the top distribution. You can argue the figures if you like, but by any standard that I have seen it is far and away the most popular distribution. The biggest problem however is not the Canonical Ubuntu derivatives but the growing number of non-Canonical ones.

10 reasons why GNOME is better than KDE

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: A new battle is playing out in the Linux desktop arena. See why Jack Wallen believes that today’s GNOME has pulled ahead of today’s KDE in terms of design, stability, and usability.

Novell's SUSE Linux futures

Filed under
SUSE

blogs.computerworld: Novell is in trouble. As Novell CFO Dana Russell said during the recent earnings call, "Our Linux business is dependent on large deals, which may result in some fluctuations of our quarterly invoicing. Moving ahead, Novell plans on reducing the prices of its products.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

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