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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Sun's Historic Java Announcement

Filed under
OSS

This is an historic day. Let's share it together. Sun believes deeply in creating communities and sharing innovations and technologies to foster more participation. Today in a historic move, Sun is opening the door to greater innovation by open sourcing key Java implementations.

Also: Download sun java GPL’d source code

Is Free Software the future of India? Steve Ballmer CEO of Microsoft answers...

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Microsoft

The solemn occasion was the talk show hosted by NDTV 24x7 - a premier cable television news channel in India. The very first question that was asked off Steve Ballmer was the following: Is Free Software the future of India?

Why I finally switched to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

My first two months of using Ubuntu were pretty... difficult. Installing Linux on a laptop (for complete beginners) was supposedly a relatively complex task (specially if, like me, you don't like asking questions on forums). So I basically ended up with a pretty buggy installation (less buggy than my Windows partition, even though my laptop is only three months old). But still, other than my original ideological motivations, what could possibly warrant a definitive switch to Ubuntu?

KMyMoney: Coming along, but still not there

Filed under
Software

KMyMoney is KDE's personal financial management program. If you don't have complex needs and a lot of history to import, KMyMoney lets you set up accounts, enter transactions, and generate reports easily, and other features are doable with some help from the generous amounts of documentation. However, KMyMoney is not a good choice for small business owners, who need more functionality than it can provide.

Open source rival takes on Google Maps

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Software

Volunteer "citizen cartographers" are aiming to take on the likes of Google Maps and Ordnance Survey by creating a free open source wiki-style map of the planet.

Large public-sector Linux project flops

Filed under
Linux

A publicly funded Linux project which cost UK taxpayers half-a-million pounds has flopped. Birmingham City Council began the project — one of the largest public-sector Linux projects in the UK — in May 2005 to evaluate the potential of open-source software. The council, the largest local authority in the UK, intended to deploy open-source software on 1,500 PCs in libraries across the city.

UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 2: The vi text editor

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Linux

The vi text editor might seem counterintuitive to new users but, make no mistake, there is a good reason this 30-year old tool is still widely used by many of the best developers in the world. The vi text editor separates operations into insert mode and command mode, which gives you ultrafast access to key commands that can edit, insert, and move text in on-the-fly, user-defined segments.

Microsoft patent pledge an 'empty promise'

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Microsoft

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) has dismissed Microsoft's patent pledge to open source developers as "meaningless" and warned that it could provide a false sense of security.

CLI Magic: Enhancing the shell with fish

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Software

The Friendly Interactive Shell (fish) is an alternative command line that is designed to be easy to learn and use. fish turns on by default options that are available in shells such as Bash or tcsh and develops them far beyond other shells. The result is a command line that can go a long way toward curing the phobia that many GNU/Linux users nurse from their experience with the DOS command line.

PS3 is nifty, but it's a bit too pricey

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Gaming

After spending time with Sony's new PlayStation 3 game console last week, I understand why Microsoft's Xbox team has been strutting lately. Don't get me wrong. The PS3 is an amazing machine. I'd love to have one sitting beneath my TV. But not for $500 or $600.

Also: Playstation 3 dissected and analysed

Can Novell Make the Sale?

Filed under
SUSE

Recently, Novell made a statement that could’ve given them some grief. In an online publication Computer Business Review Online, Novell was apparently quoted as stating that Vista would cost $300 more than their SuSE option. What Novell appears to have missed is a seemingly long list of Vista licenses with a number of price ranges. To add insult to injury, it appears the page containing the quote has since been pulled down.

The four most trendy Linux developments

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Linux

The buzz over Linux is hardly new. Vendors of every ilk have tripped over themselves to announce Linux-related products. But even in the deafening noise surrounding Linux, four topics stand out : the duel for the desktop, 3-D desktop tools, isolated virtual environments (also known as containerization or virtualization), and mobile Linux devices.

Analysis - Sun GPLs Java

Filed under
Software

First, Sun Microsystems Inc. wouldn't do it. Then Sun teased us with it. Now, on Nov. 13, Sun will finally open-source its implementations of Java under the GNU GPLv2. On Monday, Sun released the first pieces of source code for Sun's implementation of JSE and a buildable implementation of JME.

Quick Look at Urli OS 6.10

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Urli 6.10 is an Debian/Ubuntu derived Linux OS developed in Argentina. It was recently added to distrowatch's waiting list and sounded a bit interesting given that their motto seems to be "Linux like never before!" Well, this I had to see.

Is Ubuntu set to become non-free?

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Ubuntu

Last week at the Ubuntu Developer Summit the release goals for Feisty Fawn—scheduled to appear April 2007—were discussed and drawn up. Ubuntu's next version is aiming for some pretty good features such as a bullet proof X.org and network roaming. There's one change that bothers me to no end though: composite by default.

Q&A: VMware co-founder Mendel Rosenblum

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Interviews

At the third and by far the biggest VMware's annual VMworld convention last week, we grabbed the chance to speak to the company's virtualisation visionary and co-founder, Mendel Rosenblum. Where does he see the company taking this fast-evolving technology?

Month of Kernel Bugs: Linux in the lead

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OS

At this point in time, nine vulnerabilities in operating system kernels have been publicised as part of the Month of Kernel Bugs. Following on July's Month of Browser Bugs initiated by H.D. Moore, a similar project to highlight security vulnerabilities has been announced for November under the title "Month of Kernel Bugs" (MoKB). The project's initiators intend to release one security hole per day for the various operating system kernels.

Clear indication that Linux has arrived

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Linux

Oracle’s announcement of providing support on Red Hat Linux is a clear indication that Linux has arrived. Linux, which started out as a hobby among some engineers, is today enterprise-ready and important enough for Oracle to provide support.

openSUSE 10.2 Beta 2 Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

The countdown continues on the road to 10.2 with the latest release of beta 2 on the 10th. This release didn't bring too many surprises, but things seem to be shaping up nicely. In light of all the negative publicity of Novell's recent announcement, I imagine the pressure is bearing down on the openSUSE infantry to release a banner system. I wish them luck and I think they are on the right path.

Samba says Novell-Microsoft deal sucks

Filed under
SUSE

THE OPEN SOURCE guys at Samba hit out at Novell's rapprochement with Microsoft, saying they disapproved strongly of the former Utah firm's actions.

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More in Tux Machines

Mint 18 Released, No GUI Please, Atomic Host 7.2.5

Today in Linux news, the Red Hat announcements kept on coming including the release of Red Hat Atomic Host 7.2.5. Elsewhere, Mint 18 in Cinnamon and MATE flavors was announced by Clement Lefebvre as promised. Bryan Lunduke just finished up 10 days using only a Linux terminal saying it "was too painful" and Eric Grevstad said using Linux and LibreOffice will change your life. Read more

July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the July 2016 issue: * Seven Years Later: A Look Back * Installing A Seeburg 1000 On PCLinuxOS * ms_meme's Nook: Anytime * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: tuxlink * GIMP Tutorial: Engraved Text * Game Zone: Funklift * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: A Simple HTTP Server * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Meemaw. Download the PDF (8.3 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-07.pdf Download the EPUB Version (6.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (7.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

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    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
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  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.