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About Tux Machines

Friday, 21 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kubuntu 11.10 Review srlinuxx 1 11/11/2011 - 5:14pm
Story Need Linux Skills? 12 Places to Learn Online srlinuxx 1 11/11/2011 - 4:59pm
Story Full-fledged Ubuntu or Debian GNU/Linux on your phone!? lefty.crupps 11/11/2011 - 3:01pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 1 11/11/2011 - 2:11pm
Story Enabling Compiz Fusion On Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) falko 11/11/2011 - 9:39am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 11/11/2011 - 9:04am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 11/11/2011 - 8:52am
Story Desura client may be open sourced srlinuxx 11/11/2011 - 8:45am
Story Vodafone Ubuntu Webbook srlinuxx 11/11/2011 - 8:42am
Story Everything should be open source, says WordPress founder srlinuxx 11/11/2011 - 7:22am

Phoenix bios locks out all OS's except Vista!

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If you're buying a new computer in the near future, it may be a good idea to avoid systems with Phoenix bios on them. There's recent proof that their 2003 contract with Microsoft has born fruit in their latest bios versions which now prevent you from installing any OS other than Vista.

A Brief Look at SugarUI by RedHat

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A few days ago Red Hat shared with the world the first ISO images of the system that is planned to be installed on the OLPC laptops. I suddenly felt an irresistible urge … I downloaded the 291 MB ISO, burned it on a CD and started testing. Here is what I got.

Damn Small Linux book set for July

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Every once in awhile, I check Amazon to see what books are upcoming in various categories (using the "publication date" option), and just such a search has uncovered what looks to be the first Damn Small Linux book, "The Official Damn Small Linux Book: The Tiny Adaptable Linux That Runs on Anything," by Robert Singledecker, John Andrews and Christopher Negus -- and set for release in July.

Xfce 4.4.1 released Officially Released

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Although it's been on the mirrors for a day or two, XFCE 4.4.1 has now been officially announced. This is the first maintenance release of Xfce 4.4 (the current stable branch of Xfce) aimed at fixing important bugs and update translations.


GoblinX Premium 2007.1

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GoblinX developers released their 2007.1 Premium version of GoblinX Linux recently and I was able to obtain the 1-cd version for testing. GoblinX has always been a very interesting project to watch with their odd-looking almost macabre-themed XFCE distro.

Debian 4.0 (Etch)

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After 21 months of development Debian has released version 4.0 codenamed Etch to the public on April, 8th 2007. In Debian time 21 months is downright snippy, which is a good thing. Trust me on that.

Mozilla seeks security researchers to look at alpha code

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Mozilla Corporation wants to get the security community involved in ironing out possible bugs with the next version of Firefox at an earlier stage.

Instead of pointing out security bugs once Firefox 3.0 gets released, Mozilla wants security vendors involved while the software in still a work in progress.

Linux has game

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It seems like every time we turn around on the forums, there is a tremendous backlash against the Windows OS and Microsoft as a whole. Some of it is even well-deserved - the amount of overhead required by the new Vista OS has made many otherwise very usable computers completely obsolete, and that's before you spend the money for Vista itself.

The Future of the Linux Desktop

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“The year of Linux on the Desktop.” Typically, these articles show up near the end of the year. They always cause a big debate “Will 200* be the year of Linux on the Desktop?!” is the headline, followed by comment wars. The comment wars break down like this. Linux vs. Windows users, Mac vs. Linux users, a branch war of Windows vs. Mac users, KDE vs.

Quake 4 On XP, Vista, & Linux

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For the release of Cedega 6.0 "Swordfish" later this week, Phoronix will be offering a performance comparison of Enemy Territory and Doom 3 running natively in Microsoft Windows XP, Microsoft Windows Vista, and Linux. Along with those numbers we will be sharing the results when each game was benchmarked in WINE 0.9.32 and Cedega 6.0.

ClearType issue and openSUSE

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There’s a slashdot posting up about Novell disabling a font type, ClearType, from the the openSUSE distribution in connection with possible Microsoft patent concerns. This seems to have created some confusion, in that a number of observers are wondering why, given Novell’s patent agreement with Microsoft, this technology wouldn’t be allowed in openSUSE.

OpenSUSE vs Ubuntu

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I have used Ubuntu for almost 2 years and was completely in love with Ubuntu. One fine day my UPS gave up and my root file system was corrupted. It clearly means a re-install. Now that I have used OpenSUSE for 2 months, here is a brief comparison between my experiences with Ubuntu and OpenSUSE.

Open Source Community Gains Momentum - Good News for Red Hat

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Sure, Red Hat's (RHT) most recent financial results, announced March 29, didn't blow away investors. But the future looks bright. The reason: Open source application developers continue to gain serious momentum. And many of those developers are firmly committed to Red Hat.

Just How 'Free' Are Open Source Licensing Models?

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Confusion and controversy about Open Source licensing did not start with current Free Software Foundation efforts to revise the GNU General Public License (GPL). Nor will emergence of an acceptable GPL V3 – or of a revised Lesser GPL or Affero GPL (thanks Dana Blankenhorn) – make OS licensing much less problematical for enterprise users.

Exploring Dolphin, The KDE 4 File Manager

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KDE 4, the next release of the popular Linux Desktop environment will, among other changes, no longer use the longtime file manager Konqueror by default, opting instead for the improved usability and enhanced browsing features of the Dolphin file manager.

Apache battles Sun over Java license

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The Apache Software Foundation is in a dispute with Sun Microsystems over a license for the Java technology compatibility kit needed for the Apache Harmony project.

Harmony is an open source implementation of Java Platform, Standard Edition (Java SE) 5.

Perens Lashes Out at Claims GPL 3 Brings Legal Risks

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Open-source developer and evangelist Bruce Perens has scathingly dismissed claims by a lawyer for the Association for Competitive Technology that the latest draft of Version 3 of the GNU General Public License brings legal risks.

Opera users are most satisfied

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Surfers that use the Opera and Firefox browsers are more satisfied than those who employ the services of Microsoft's Internet Explorer, according to research.

A survey carried out by NetApplications and SurveyWare found that Mozilla's Firefox is the considered the best browser software available. However, given its small user base, Opera seems to have the most satisfied customers.

Digital World: The rise of Linux (finally)?

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One day - soon, possibly, maybe - you might find yourself using a form of Linux, even if you're a diehard Windows user. It's the next big thing.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions
    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog. "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.
  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia
    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.
  • MySQL and database programming for beginners
    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL. In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.
  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air
    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times. Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd. Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was. That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.
  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped
    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future. Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.
  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency
    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain. The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent. We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.
  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware
    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.
  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?
    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

And More Security Leftovers

  • The NyaDrop Trojan for Linux-running IoT Devices
  • Flaw resides in BTB helps bypass ASLR
  • Thoughts on the BTB Paper
    Though the attack might have some merits with regards to KASLR, the attack on ASLR is completely debunked. The authors of the paper didn't release any supporting code or steps for independent analysis and verification. The results, therefore, cannot be trusted until the authors fully open source their work and the work is validated by trusted and independent third parties.
  • Spreading the DDoS Disease and Selling the Cure
    Earlier this month a hacker released the source code for Mirai, a malware strain that was used to launch a historically large 620 Gbps denial-of-service attack against this site in September. That attack came in apparent retribution for a story here which directly preceded the arrest of two Israeli men for allegedly running an online attack for hire service called vDOS. Turns out, the site where the Mirai source code was leaked had some very interesting things in common with the place vDOS called home.

Blockchain and FOSS

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Celebrating 12 years of Ubuntu
    Founder Mark Shuttleworth announced the first public release of Ubuntu – version 4.10, or “Warty Warthog” – on Oct. 20, 2004. The idea behind what would become the most recognizable and widely used Linux distributions ever was simple – create a Linux operating system that anybody could use. Here’s a look back at Ubuntu’s history.
  • Happy 12th Birthday, Ubuntu!
    Yup, it’s twelve years to the day since Mark Shuttleworth sat down to tap out the first Ubuntu release announcement and herald in an era of “Linux for human beings”.
  • A Slice of Ubuntu
    The de facto standard for Raspberry Pi operating systems is Raspbian–a Debian based distribution specifically for the diminutive computer. Of course, you have multiple choices and there might not be one best choice for every situation. It did catch our eye, however, that the RaspEX project released a workable Ubunutu 16.10 release for the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3. RaspEX is a full Linux Desktop system with LXDE (a lightweight desktop environment) and many other useful programs. Firefox, Samba, and VNC4Server are present. You can use the Ubuntu repositories to install anything else you want. The system uses kernel 4.4.21. You can see a review of a much older version of RaspEX in the video below.
  • Download Ubuntu Yakkety Yak 16.10 wallpaper
    The Yakkety Yak 16.10 is released and now you can download the new wallpaper by clicking here. It’s the latest part of the set for the Ubuntu 2016 releases following Xenial Xerus. You can read about our wallpaper visual design process here.
  • Live kernel patching from Canonical now available for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    We are delighted to announce the availability of a new service for Ubuntu which any user can enable on their current installations – the Canonical Livepatch Service. This new live kernel patching service can be used on any Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system (using the generic Linux 4.4 kernel) to minimise unplanned downtime and maintain the highest levels of security.
  • How to enable free 'Canonical Livepatch Service' for Linux kernel live-patching on Ubuntu
    Linux 4.0 introduced a wonderful feature for those that need insane up-time -- the ability to patch the kernel without rebooting the machine. While this is vital for servers, it can be beneficial to workstation users too. Believe it or not, some home users covet long up-time simply for fun -- bragging rights, and such. If you are an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS user (with generic Linux kernel 4.4) and you want to take advantage of this exciting feature, I have good news -- it is now conveniently available for free! Unfortunately, this all-new Canonical Livepatch Service does have a catch -- it is limited to three machines per user. Of course, home users can register as many email addresses as they want, so it is easy to get more if needed. Businesses can pay for additional machines through Ubuntu Advantage. Want to give it a go? Read on. "Since the release of the Linux 4.0 kernel about 18 months ago, users have been able to patch and update their kernel packages without rebooting. However, until now, no other Linux distribution has offered this feature for free to their users. That changes today with the release of the Canonical Livepatch Service", says Tom Callway, Director of Cloud Marketing, Canonical.
  • KernelCare Is Another Alternative To Canonical's Ubuntu Live Kernel Patching
    Earlier this week Canonical announced their Kernel Livepatching Service for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS users. Canonical's service is free for under three systems while another alternative for Ubuntu Linux users interested in a commercial service is CloudLinux's KernelCare. The folks from CloudLinux wrote in to remind us of their kernel patching solution, which they've been offering since 2014 and believe is a superior solution to Canonical's service. KernelCare isn't limited to just Ubuntu 16.04 but also works with Ubuntu 14.04 and other distributions such as CentOS/RHEL, Debian, and other enterprise Linux distributions.