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About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu, see you in October 2012 srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 9:29pm
Story The Big, Bad Browser Quiz srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:37pm
Story Canonical Again Pushes Desktop Ubuntu for the Enterprise srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:34pm
Story Intel pulls MeeGo plug? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:32pm
Story We won and we didn't notice srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 6:30pm
Story New features in ubuntu 11.10 srlinuxx 3 02/09/2011 - 5:54pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 7:11am
Story Why is the packaging process so broken?!? srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:39am
Story Kernel.org breach does not reflect well on admins srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:36am
Story SUSE Loses Another Former RadeonHD Developer srlinuxx 02/09/2011 - 3:35am

A Second Look At Pardus 2007.1 RC: Surprises, Surprises

Filed under
Linux

My first look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate was somehow pessimistic, however I was confident in the future. This second attempt will start by showing some success, however it will end with an even more pessimistic view. But let's not anticipate...

An Update On Server/Site Move

Filed under
Site News

Well, I guess we'll go with this debian install. I still haven't worked out all the kinks yet cuz my gran'babies came over today and I didn't get a chance to work on things. I took the opportunity to upgrade drupal as you may have noticed too, and it was a much easier upgrade this time.

Linux Mint: Taking Ubuntu to the Next Level

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

For the last several years, Ubuntu has been providing a superb desktop operating system consisting of open-source software. It has done a great job, but the philosophy behind Ubuntu prevents proprietary software from being included out of the box. This is where Linux Mint comes in.

Home networking Linux and Windows

Filed under
Linux

Lately I've been working on enabling network shares on most of the systems that run in my house. They're the various computers that have shown up over the years and are now parked in corners of rooms around my house. With the exception of the iMac and europa, every one came with Windows pre-installed. If they run Linux, it was installed well after the fact.

Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care

Filed under
OSS

My first planel for South by Southwest was titled, "Open Source: Tell Me Why I Care." Four advocates discussed the reasons for using open source. Pleasantly, there was almost no Microsoft-bashing, and only a little discussion of using open source because it's socially the right thing to do.

Open source can be very `benefit-driven'

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Over the last five years, the IT community has seen a consuming increase in the usage of open-source technologies and acknowledged the role Sun Microsystems played in the process. eWorld spoke to Matt Thomson of Sun Microsystems Inc at Sun Tech Days.

Linux Good for Environment and Bottom Line

Filed under
Linux

A new report from the UK government has found that switching to Linux can not only cut costs but also help reduce the burden of e-waste by dramatically reducing hardware obsolescence.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop. Part 1: Switching is hard

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, I’ve found that the saying “it just works” is about as useful as saying that airplanes “just fly.” It’s an easy thing to say until you have to learn to pilot one. Foreign languages also “just work.” But have you ever tried to learn one?

Linux is like that.

bash ninja - everyday commands for the commandline

Filed under
HowTos

When using the terminal, there are a lot of tricks and shortcuts that can make using the terminal much more efficient and pleasurable. I'll list here some of the key ones that I use.

Review of Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5 (Feisty Fawn)

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

There's a lot of exciting things going on in the world of Linux distros and while browsing for alternatives to (K)Ubuntu I stumbled across PCLinuxOS. While discussing my new found love for PCLOS I decided that I shouldn't forget the distro that seems to have started it all - Ubuntu!

How To Use Jigdo For Incremental CD Updates (Daily Builds)

Filed under
HowTos

Jigdo is really nice for rebuilding daily CD images without downloading the entire CD again, which can waste bandwidth and time when the latest daily build may have only updated a handful of packages. Here is what you’ll need to setup and use Jigdo.

Why Ubuntu isn’t mainstream yet

Filed under
Ubuntu

I’ve been using Fedora for about 8-9 months at work and have recently moved from XP to Ubuntu on my home machine as well. My reason was that to check out something new (and free) before I decide to dish out cash for Vista and a system upgrade (although I’d prefer to buy a Vista Ready laptop and keep my desktop as it is). I’d heard a lot of good things about Ubuntu and wanted to give Linux a second chance (after nightmares at work with Fedora Core 3).

The Power of Linux Console

Filed under
HowTos

A console (terminal, terminal emulation) and a shell are equivalent to what is commonly known in Windows as the ‘command line’. For many it’s just a mysterious and unnecessary system tool, reserved only for the ‘1337′.

Freespire 2.0 Alpha 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

With the switch to an Ubuntu base, development of Freespire 2.0 has restarted. The first alpha release of Freespire 2.0 is now available for download and we had decided to check it out for ourselves.

Setting Up A DNS Server On Ubuntu Edgy With MyDNS And MyDNSConfig

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this tutorial I will describe how to install and configure MyDNS and MyDNSConfig. MyDNS is a DNS server that uses a MySQL database as backend instead of configuration files like, for example, Bind or djbdns.

Cracking Open the Door to Open Source

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

When Bill Hilf came from IBM Corp. to join Microsoft three years ago, the company's stance on open source vacillated wildly. It would swing from outright indifference to overt nastiness. Today, something else is unfolding: Microsoft is striking a surprising balance. It has stopped dismissing open source licensing and community development as dangerous folly or evil foe, and is looking for a way to both compete and co-exist.

Should Google acquire Open Office?

Filed under
Google

I think there could be a lot of benefits to both parties if Open Office were to work along side the Google Docs team. Now I’m not talking about Google buying Open Office; instead I’m talking about Google hiring some programmers to work on the Open Office application and help integrate the two. I know this is going to cause some controversy, but just hear me out.

Former Mass. CIO feels 'bittersweet pride' after battles with Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

As CIO of Massachusetts from February to November last year, Louis Gutierrez had to endure most of the brunt of Microsoft Corp.'s political wrath over a state policy calling for the adoption of the Open Document Format for Office Applications, or ODF.

The Ultimate Time Waster

Filed under
Gaming

Today I have for you something guaranteed to lower your productivity: Wesnoth. This game is one of those free software apps that is of the quality of a proprietary application. Wesnoth is essentially a MO-RTS (multiplayer online real-time strategy) game. It offers two modes: campaign and multiplayer.

Ubuntu 7.04 Alpha 5+ - Updating experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

I'm writing about how Ubuntu handled an automatic update the week of March 5, 2007. These days the process of keeping your system up to date has evolved considerably so that it is very easy to stay current with fixes and security updates. Upgrading is not always straight forward.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more