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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story systemd 214 Gets Lots of New Features Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:42am
Story F22 System Wide Change: Replace Yum With DNF Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:39am
Story Mozilla's Science Lab is a hub for the open research community Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:31am
Story KaOS 2014.06 Is a Beautiful KDE-Powered Distro Built from Scratch Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:23am
Story Interviews: Bruce Perens Answers Your Questions Roy Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:21am
Story Forked Android build targets dual-boot x86 laptops, tablets Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:16am
Story Xfce4-power-manager 1.3.0 Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:09am
Story Raspberry Pi sales hit three million milestone Roy Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:08am
Story Extremadura health care has switched to open source Roy Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:07am
Story "Shatter" Might Finally Materialize For The X.Org Server Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 6:59am

Asus Eee 900 to hit shelves on 1 May

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

news.zdnet: The second version of Asus' low-cost subnotebook, the Eee PC, will go on sale on 1 May. The Eee 900, which will come with an operating-system choice of Linux or Windows, will cost £329. The Linux version will have 20GB of solid-state storage on-board.

Also: ASUS Eee PC 900 review roundup

Review: Dream Linux 3.0 - Is It Really A Dream?

Filed under
Linux

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: Today's victim... sorry guest is the Brazilian distribution Dream Linux 3.0, a Debian-based distro I'd heard quite a bit about but never actually used. After a while out of the game would I still remember how to do this? Well, I'll leave that up to you to judge but here's how I got on...

Ubuntu takes early lead in Open Source Census

Filed under
OSS

community.zdnet: Ninety percent of participants have Ubuntu, and about half are in the US (with an impressive and results-bending 33 percent from Finland). Two thirds of them are small businesses (ten to 49 people).

Ubuntu Linux upgrade: Why you should try it

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworlduk.com: If there is a single complaint that is laid at the feet of Linux time and time again, it's that the operating system is too complicated and arcane for casual computer users to tolerate. Ubuntu, the user-friendly distribution sponsored by Mark Shuttleworth's Canonical, has made a mission out of dispelling such complaints entirely.

Green PCs: CPU frequency scaling in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux.org: Electricity bills got higher again? Does your computer waste too many power cycles? Or perpahs you just don’t feel green enough? In any case, this article is for you! You’ll learn how to save energy and CPU cycles with your Linux box, no matter how old it is.

Linux: Sexy, Smart, and Cheap. The Perfect Date.

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Yes yes, I realize it's no surprise we feel pretty attached to Linux here at Linux Journal, but that aside, what's not to love about Linux? Especially in the last few years, it's no longer a matter of whether Linux is ready for the desktop yet -- it's just a matter of when are people going to realize it? Thankfully, we're starting to see that. And here's why:

Your Linux Skills - Use them or lose them

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: I've been noticing a disturbing trend among Linux users of late, myself included, that has begun to bother me enough to necessitate writing this short article. What is this trend? It's a general loss of the Linux skillsets that so many of us senior users have gained over the years.

A GNOME-based Desktop on Demand

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Desktop on Demand (DOD) is the latest contender to give users a full-fledged remote desktop instead of Web-based applications to help users to stay productive when they are on the move. Similar to Ulteo, DOD gives you a full-blown remote Linux-based desktop -- but that's where the similarity ends.

Songbird media player: the love child of Mozilla and WinAmp

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Ian McKellar gave a presentation on the Songbird media player at LugRadio Live this past weekend. The talk introduced some of the underlying goals behind the Songbird project and included a demonstration of some of the core technologies in the Songbird media player.

Google closed source app engine does evil

Filed under
Google

itwire.com: This time Google App Engine gives the great promise of letting you serve your own applications to the world using the grunt of Google-powered machinery. However, it’s not the saviour it purports to be, perverting the open source way.

Also: Google says “sod it... lets do a bit of evil”
And: Google Earth 4.3

Get rid of your Linux bloat. Part 1.

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox: Your Linux is bloated. Its fat and waddles around like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man of Ghostbusters fame. It limps along like a legless slug. It crawls along slower than dead turtle. There are many things you can do to optimise your system.

Medusa4 - a powerful software tool for free

Filed under
Software

linux-tip.net: CAD Schroer released the Fourth Generation of the globally renowned MEDUSA engineering product suite. Its powerful software tools were developed to work the way engineers do, helping you get product to market faster, and designs to customers quicker and more efficiently.

some leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The making of Wine (how to make Windows apps merrier with Linux)

  • Taking a closer look at the Opera browser
  • My not-so-positive ramblings on the Asus EEEPC
  • Open-source anti-virus scanner hit by exploit
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 6th April 2008
  • Upgrading to 8.04
  • Gentoo Safe Flags
  • Kernel space: memory allocation failures
  • 4 months and 10 days without any new Debian developer. Is Debian dying?

Where Novell Can Beat Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

thevarguy.com: The VAR Guy admits it: He left Novell for dead last year. But recent conversations with the company forced him to rethink all of those negative notions. In a few markets, Novell may actually thrive. And in one particular market, Novell could give Microsoft a run for its money.

Also: Novell slashes mainframe Linux pricing

Just 10 Years of Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: Abhijit Nadgouda says it's been a decade since the term open source was chosen to represent the concept. This is true, but the concept has been around far longer. Sure, it has forever changed the way software is created and consumed, but why now all of a sudden?

Also: What Hurts Them Helps Us: How Open Source Benefits from the Bad

6 Must-Have Firefox Extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com/blog: In a photo tour I posted a few days ago, I provided some handy Firefox tips that can save you time if you spend a lot of time in almost everyone's favorite open source browser. To get the most out of Firefox, though, I recommend using the best extensions. In this post, I'll round up six of my favorites.

Also: Mozilla Developer News April 15

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Perl Script To Graph Iostat Output on Unix

  • Mandriva repo guide for newbie
  • Real Player 11
  • How-To: Import/Export GPG key pair
  • Bringing chat to the browser with JWChat

Budget Fair Queuing IO Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "We are working [on] a new I/O scheduler based on CFQ, aiming at improved predictability and fairness of the service, while maintaining the high throughput it already provides," began Fabio Checconi, announcing the BFQ I/O scheduler.

My kid hates Linux too! (so what?)

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: My kid hates Linux too. He’s 16, loves games, and finally stopped whining for a GameCube when he learned his Windows DVDs could also be played online. But for a kid to say he “hates” Linux is simply mistaken, on the kid’s part. If he uses Google, or thousands of other sites, he loves Linux.

Also: First my kid hates Linux, now I have to buy laptops with Vista

ISO Ill at Ease Over OOXML

computerworlduk.com: The nominal approval of OOXML last month unleashed an unprecedented outpouring of anger, with much of that ire directed at the ISO for failing to uphold basic standards during the process. This has prompted it to respond with a rather interesting FAQ in which it desperately tries to defend itself.

Also: Microsoft's OOXML trophy is conditional

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.