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Friday, 19 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:22pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:21pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:21pm
Story US Navy's First Autonomous Swarmboats Are Controlled with Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:06pm
Story It's not just Munich: Open source gains new ground in Germany Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 6:19pm
Story FreeBSD Is Slowly But Surely Trying To Catch Up With Linux Graphics Drivers Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 5:26pm
Story Listaller + Glick: Some new ideas Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 5:22pm
Story Google, Oracle Java API copyright battle lands at Supreme Court Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 12:27pm
Story This Android Tablet Has a 50″ Projector Built In…And It’s Amazing Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 12:07pm
Story Firefox OS Shows Continued Global Growth Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 12:00pm

Balancing Respect and Diversity

Filed under
Linux

jonobacon.org: Historically, the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu has been strained at times. There are various technical and social reasons behind this discomfort in our relationship, and while there is still work to be done to ensure we are working effectively together, the relationship has most certainly improved in recent years.

Extract Archives on Right-Click in KDE 4

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: In KDE 3, extracting archives, such as zip and tar files, is pretty simple. You just find the relevant file in Konqueror or Dolphin, right-click it and choose Extract for a list of extraction options. For some reason, that functionality hasn’t been copied over to KDE 4.

The End Of the OS As We Know It

Filed under
Software

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: So the bloggers over at ZDNet have once again proclaimed the end of the operating system. Is the OS going away if people primarily use applications via a browser? I use hosted applications via a browser. I use Word Press, Flickr, Google Apps, Gmail, online money management, online banking and so on.

Also: The Future of Computing is the Yugo

BBC Opens Up - Or Does it?

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: The BBC's iPlayer site has been a target of open source community ire since it started. Originally delivering content via Microsoft DRM-protected technologies, a recent announcement from the BBC's Erik Huggers appears to offer some promise of relief:

10 FAQ After one Week on Linux

Filed under
Linux

168hours.wordpress: There are many cases when after looking at some of the FAQ on the web you ask yourself: “Are they for real? Who asks those questions anyway?” On the other hand there are many really helpful FAQ.

China takes lead in Linux education

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Since the Chinese government began supporting domestic open source communities in 2005, hundreds of thousands of young people in the world's most populous country have become a part of the open source world.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report

Mandriva released the 2009 Beta 1 iso's on July 29th. I downloaded the i586 version then. Since then, hundreds of software updates, patches, and fixes have been placed into Mandriva's "Cooker" repositories, Cooker being Mandriva's name for it's development branch.

How are things shaping up for the Mandriva 2009 release? And how's KDE 4.1 working on this new release?

Dogs hide bones, Firefox hides useful tricks

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: Firefox is one of those applications that's so hard to write about, because there may be little tricks and shortcuts I've been using for some time, and someone will discover one and say, "Hey, that rocks! Why didn't anyone tell me?"

Interesting Improvements In GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this year prior to the release of GNOME 2.22 we had shared eight interesting improvements in GNOME 2.22. Now with the official GNOME 2.24 release due out next month, this time around we're sharing a few of the interesting highlights for this GNOME update.

Pixar's rendering software - big on Linux servers, not Mac

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: A reader of my recent story on Pixar announcing that its popular RenderMan Pro Server software would start to support Windows clusters questioned why I hadn't noted whether or not RenderMan already ran on Mac and Linux server clusters, known as 'render farms' in the animation biz.

Dell's Latitude-On instant OS detailed, screenshooted

Filed under
Linux

engadget.com: Seems the act of waking a sleeping laptop to a full-blown OS is no longer in vogue. We're not sure when this happened though we're pretty sure that ASUS' decision to embed SplashTop into its P5E3 mobo had something to do with it. The benefit, of course, is an extension of battery life to days instead of hours.

Test Driving Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome Edition

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: This was my first ever adventure with a Slakware-based GNU/Linux distribution so I cannot say it has been an easy, effortless task, but that's probably just my lack of experience, because, after I finished the installation and testing of Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome edition, it all made much more sense.

gOS 3 Gadgets (beta) targets Linux beginners and Google Gadgets lovers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I first heard of gOS when it was chosen to power the $199 Wal-Mart gPC. The third iteration of the OS, gOS 3.0 "Gadgets" Beta, was released last week. It's a great Web-focused desktop, but it doesn't offer much to experienced or current Ubuntu users.

Also: A video tour of gOS Gadgets 3 (beta)

Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

  • First look at Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 4
  • How to install ubuntu: a painless procedure
  • How to install a package in Ubuntu

ISO's Day of Shame

Filed under
OSS
  • ISO's Day of Shame

  • Not very appealing: ISO/IEC kicks out appeals
  • ISO, IEC reject appeals, approve OOXML spec

The end run around the OS is underway

blogs.zdnet: The operating system may be losing its luster. In fact, you could argue that the operating system–Linux, OS X and Windows–will become an application that just happens to boot first. And hardware vendors are on to the OS’s diminishing importance.

What Comes After the Windows Era?

linuxjournal.com: As a computer journalist for the last 25 years, I've received a lot of review copies of software. As something of an obsessive magpie, I've tended to keep most of it. Until yesterday, that is, when I finally threw out all those copies. What's makes this little spring-cleaning exercise particularly apt as well as cathartic is that all of us - and not just me - may finally be witnessing the end of the Windows era.

Linux community often tapped for beta testing

zdnetasia.com: It is common for the open source community to be called upon by vendors--including proprietary vendors--to be beta testers for Linux releases, according to an industry player.

Powerful graphical tools for Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Linux has a bad reputation of having to use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to do anything really useful. In this article I will talk about some graphical interfaces for tools to get those "useful" things done.

Will Linux Ever Be a Contender?

Filed under
Linux

geeknewscentral.com: I read an article earlier this week saying that Linux sees a Windows Free world. Well if that's true, I would have to wonder what people would go to, because Linux is not it. At least, not now.

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More in Tux Machines

Meltdown and Spectre Linux Kernel Status - Update

I keep getting a lot of private emails about my previous post previous post about the latest status of the Linux kernel patches to resolve both the Meltdown and Spectre issues. These questions all seem to break down into two different categories, “What is the state of the Spectre kernel patches?”, and “Is my machine vunlerable?” Read more

today's leftovers

OSS: Jio, VMware Openwashing, and Testing Jobs

  • Jio is committed to use open source technology: Akash Ambani
    Speaking at the India Digital Open Summit 2018, Akash Ambani, Director of Reliance Jio Infocomm, said that open source is very important for his company. “The year 2017 was the tipping point for AR and VR globally. In India, AR and VR are in the initial stages of adoption but at Jio, we believe it will grow at a 50 percent compounded rate for the next five years,” Akash said. He also spoke on the evolution of artificial intelligence and blockchain.
  • VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH [Ed: It looks like the author has been reduced to Microsoft propaganda and other openwashing puff pieces sponsored by proprietary software giants. We have given up on several writers who used to support GNU/Linux. Seeing their activity, it seems as though they ended up with neither gigs nor credibility (used to get far more writing assignments from LF, often for Microsoft openwashing).]
  • Hehe, still writing code for a living? It's 2018. You could be earning x3 as a bug bounty hunter
    Ethical hacking to find security flaws appears to pay better, albeit less regularly, than general software engineering. And while payment remains one of the top rationales for breaking code, hackers have begun citing more civic-minded reasons for their activities. A survey of 1,700 bug bounty hunters from more than 195 countries and territories by security biz HackerOne, augmented by the company's data on 900 bug bounty programs, has found that white-hat hackers earn a median salary that's 2.7 times that of typical software engineers in their home countries. In some places, the gap is far more pronounced. In India, for example, hackers make as much as 16 times the median programmer salary. In the US, they earn 2.4 times the median.

Security: Spectre and Meltdown, Industrial System Sabotage, VDP, Windows in Healthcare

  • Some thoughts on Spectre and Meltdown
     

    Contrast that with what happened this time around. Google discovered a problem and reported it to Intel, AMD, and ARM on June 1st. Did they then go around contacting all of the operating systems which would need to work on fixes for this? Not even close. FreeBSD was notified the week before Christmas, over six months after the vulnerabilities were discovered. Now, FreeBSD can occasionally respond very quickly to security vulnerabilities, even when they arise at inconvenient times — on November 30th 2009 a vulnerability was reported at 22:12 UTC, and on December 1st I provided a patch at 01:20 UTC, barely over 3 hours later — but that was an extremely simple bug which needed only a few lines of code to fix; the Spectre and Meltdown issues are orders of magnitude more complex.  

  • Menacing Malware Shows the Dangers of Industrial System Sabotage
     

    At the S4 security conference on Thursday, researchers from the industrial control company Schneider Electric, whose equipment Triton targeted, presented deep analysis of the malware—only the third recorded cyberattack against industrial equipment. Hackers [sic] were initially able to introduce malware into the plant because of flaws in its security procedures that allowed access to some of its stations, as well as its safety control network.

  • 25 per cent of hackers don't report bugs due to lack of disclosure policies
     

    One of the standout discoveries was that almost 25 per cent of respondents said they were unable to disclose a security flaw because the bug-ridden company in question lacked a vulnerability disclosure policy (VDP).

  • 'Professional' hack [sic] on Norwegian health authority compromises data of three million patients [iophk: "Windows TCO"]