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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 23 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Arch Linux Reinventing The Filesystem Structure? srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 11:33pm
Blog entry Big Thank You to All srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 11:22pm
Story 12 Unexpected Things That Exist Because Of Linux srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 7:09pm
Story The Sounds of Raspberry srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 7:07pm
Story Mozilla on Firefox OS: 'good chance of working' srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 7:06pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 6:45am
Story Grappling Hook is now lower in price srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 6:36am
Story CentOS Tops Our Web Server Poll srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 4:33am
Story Cancel Netflix if you value freedom srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 4:32am
Story Fedora 19 LXDE Spin Cleanup srlinuxx 13/07/2013 - 4:30am

MEPIS AntiX on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: I snagged the AntiX ISO after a comment left elsewhere here, and while I’m not a big Fluxbox fan, I find this to be one of the most pleasant setups I’ve seen yet.

Open source software for architects

Filed under
Software

linux.com: When I began my career as an assistant architect 12 years ago, I used AutoCAD R12, 3D Studio, CorelDraw 6.0, and Photoshop 4.0 for architectural drawing and 3-D modeling. Today, many architects still use their later versions, but those bulky packages provide many functions an architect will never use. Luckily, there are several open source alternatives.

Switch Between Gnome And KDE Desktops In Ubuntu Or Kubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

watching the net: If you have been using Ubuntu, which uses Gnome as the default desktop, or Kubuntu which uses KDE as the desktop, and have been wondering what the other desktop looks like, you can easily install KDE or Gnome and switch back and forth before logging on to Ubuntu.

Hardware Can Be Open, Too

Filed under
Hardware

linuxplanet: With open source software becoming a household name, another open source movement that may one day see some fanfare is already taking shape. Open source hardware, which I once thought to be little more than a pipe dream left over from a bygone era, is proving to be a dream that it is very much alive and growing.

Should We Listen to Walt Mossberg?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux online: Walter Mossberg, an influential tech columnist who writes primarily for the Wall Street Journal, wrote a piece the other day in which he said that Linux still wasn't ready for mainstream users. Linux enthusiasts like myself see a piece like this from such a high-profile columnist as a tremendous setback for our work.

Discontinuation of SUSE Linux 10.0

Filed under
SUSE

linuxlookup: SUSE Security announces that SUSE Linux 10.0 will be discontinued soon. Having provided security-relevant fixes for more than two years, vulnerabilities found in SUSE Linux 10.0 after November 15th 2007 will not be fixed any more for this product.

some howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Text flow in OpenOffice.org Writer

  • Arcane Linux Commands: dc
  • Running the QW:ET Demo on Fedora 7
  • Google Earth, Google Maps and Your Photos: a Tutorial
  • Searching using whereis linux command
  • Control of alternative linux executables
  • Witchy which linux command
  • How to : Setup a Local DNS Cache
  • How to list just directories (the right way)

Six Top Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

PCMAG (fox): You want distros, you got 'em. In fact, you've got more than you can possibly handle. Ultimately, you'll stick with only one, but while you're figuring out which one that is you have nothing to lose.

Also: Getting Started With Linux

Top Tip: Best distro for me to learn Linux?

Filed under
Linux

extremetech: Which Distro is the one to go with If one has never dabbled in Linux. Keeping in mind that once I do get the hang of it I can always upgrade to something more advanced. but for now I want to learn which would mean something that is more straight forward and easy to grasp. so any help of input would be most helpful.

Intel dreams of draining Linux power

Filed under
Linux
Web

builderau: Intel has launched an effort called LessWatts.org on Thursday, a combination of open-source software and helpful hints to reduce power consumption of Linux servers, PCs and gadgets.

New P2P network uses bandwidth as currency

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The only real exchange between peers in a traditional peer-to-peer network is limited to the files being transferred. Tribler is a new P2P network that's introducing social networking concepts to facilitate better interactions between users.

Great Linux Sites for Developers

Filed under
Linux
Web

Linux Insider: What's a poor, lonely Linux developer to do? Where are all the good support sites? How am I going to fix that troublesome bug?

Regular expressions and search patterns

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Every Unix system offers several useful commands for finding files and searching them for strings. Together with programming techniques such as streams, pipes, redirections, and regular expressions they comprise very powerful tools ideal for administrative tasks.

Firefox 3 alpha 8 released

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica: Firefox 3 alpha 8 has officially been released and is now available for download. The last alpha release coincided with Gecko 1.9 freeze, and this release coincides with front-end feature freeze.

Unix fundamentals - compiling software from scratch

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Installing software. It’s something that you do quite a lot if you’re like most computer users. On Unix-like systems, there are several different ways you be getting that program however - it’s not necessarily a simple case of double-clicking one setup file. One of these ways is to download the program’s source code and compile it yourself.

Who's writing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: The Linux kernel project's "git" revision control tool offers up some numbers on which developers, and which companies, contributed the most code to Linux, and who's reviewing other people's code.

Tiny Linux Redux

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Recently, the CE Linux forum has been working to revive the Linux-tiny project," stated Tim Bird on the Linux Kernel mailing list, adding that Michael Opdenacker has been selected as the project's new primary maintainer.

Also: Continued Atheros Discussions

knetworkmanager with TKIP/AES-CCMP support and GNOME 2.20

Filed under
Software

liquidat: A week ago Helmut Schaa submitted a set of changes to knetworkmanager. It now supports to chose the different security protocols used together with WPA. In other news the GNOME team released their desktop in the newest version, 2.20.

First U.S. GPL lawsuit filed

Filed under
Legal

linux-watch: Normally, GPL violations have been settled by letters from the FSF (Free Software Foundation) or other open-source organizations, pointing out the violation. For the first time in the U.S., a company, multimedia device and software vendor Monsoon Multimedia, is being taken to court for a GPL violation.

Linux: understanding it takes time

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Linux users tend to get all excited when a mainstream publication picks up any distribution and deems it worthy of review - even if the conclusions of the reviewer concerned turn out to be negative.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Space/Linux

Red Hat News

openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge

So, to summarize: openSUSE Tumbleweed is a good, solid, stable Linux distribution with a wide range of desktops available. It is not anything particularly exotic or unstable, and it does not require an unusual amount of Linux expertise to install and use on an everyday system. To make a very simple comparison, in my experience installing and using Tumbleweed is much less difficult and much less risky than using the Debian "testing" distribution, and it is kept much (much much) more up to date than openSUSE Leap, Debian "stable", Linux Mint or Ubuntu. I don't say that to demean any of those other distributions. As I said at the end of my recent post about point-release vs. rolling-release distributions, if your hardware is fully supported by one of those point-release distributions, and you are satisfied with the applications included in them, then they are certainly a good choice. But if you like staying on the leading edge, or if you have very new hardware which requires the latest Linux kernel and drivers, or you just want/need the latest version of some application (in my case this would be digiKam), then openSuSE could be just what you want. Read more Also: Google Summer of Code 2017

Graphics in Linux

  • 17 Fresh AMDGPU DC Patches Posted Today
    Seventeen more "DC" display code patches were published today for the AMDGPU DRM driver, but it's still not clear if it will be ready -- or accepted -- for Linux 4.12. AMD developers posted 17 new DC (formerly known as DAL) patches today to provide small fixes for Vega10/GFX9 hardware, various internal code changes, CP2520 DisplayPort compliance, and various small fixes.
  • libinput 1.7.0
  • Libinput 1.7 Released With Support For Lid Switches, Scroll Wheel Improvements
    Peter Hutterer has announced the new release of libinput 1.7.0 as the input handling library most commonly associated with Wayland systems but also with Ubuntu's Mir as well as the X.Org Server via the xf86-input-libinput driver.
  • Nouveau TGSI Shader Cache Enabled In Mesa 17.1 Git
    Building off the work laid by Timothy Arceri and others for enabling a TGSI (and hardware) shader cache in the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver as well as R600g TGSI shader cache due ot the common infrastructure work, the Nouveau driver is now leveraging it to enable the TGSI shader cache for Nouveau Gallium3D drivers.