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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google releases Cardboard VR viewer specs and SDKs Roy Schestowitz 12/12/2014 - 9:01am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 11:39pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 11:37pm
Story Parallels adopts Docker in next Cloud Server release Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 11:29pm
Story Five open source PaaS options you should know Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 11:06pm
Story Our approach to software and ongoing support for the first Fairphones Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 10:00pm
Story Hackable Roomba integrates Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Many Sound Updates Queued For Linux 3.19 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 7:14pm
Story SOS Open Source is Now Open Source! Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 6:52pm
Story AMD Catalyst 14.12 Omega Driver Brings Mixed Results For Linux Users Rianne Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 6:27pm

9 Must-Have OpenOffice Extensions

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OOo Like Firefox, OpenOffice also comes with extensions that you can use to improve its functionality. Here, we have tested all the extensions and sorted out those that are useful for everyday use. Some of them are for general use while some are only meant for Writer, Calc or Impress.

Switching from Windows to Linux, what you need to know

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Linux Since we are in touch economic times the most important question is “How much will this cost me”? The answer is nothing, zero, zilch or nada. I would go on the edge and say it may actually save you money. How?

Does Linux Need a $300 Million Ad Campaign?

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Linux Microsoft is now spending $300 million to counter Apple's "I'm a Mac" ads. Does Linux need its own ad campaign?

MEPIS jumps on 2.6.27

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Linux Only ten days after the release of Linux 2.6.27, the SimplyMEPIS project has decided to work the new kernel into its next release. The project today used the kernel in both 32- and 64-bit versions of the third beta release of SimplyMEPIS 8.

Introducing Open Source to the World - Part 2

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OSS In part 1 I covered some great examples of things I've learned while trying to share Open Source with those around me in school. In this part I'll be going over some of the things I've learned about evangelizing Linux to others around me.

Silly Linux users..

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Linux I read alot of Linux related news and articles. Why is it people find it so hard when trying to convince people to switch over to Linux that the chances of them being programmers is almost zero? Here’s a little stat, of the Windows users I know who ask frequently about switching to Linux, none of them even remotely care about programming.

An Introduction to Tiling Window Managers

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Software In computing, a tiling window manager is a window manager with an organization of the screen into mutually non-overlapping frames, as opposed to the more popular approach of coordinate-based stacking of overlapping objects (windows) that tries to fully emulate the desktop metaphor.

odds & ends

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Is the Linux community afraid of Opensolaris?

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OS In the last few weeks i´ve heard one sentence quite often: "Why you you still develop Solaris? You should contribute to Linux!" from people administering Linux systems. And you could read at other places, that Solaris is irrelevant, that there is nothing worth of mentioning it or even for an integration to Linux. Just think about the Zemlin quotations!

Call it a 'sub-subnotebook.' New 'PC' is small as a cell phone

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blogs.computerworld: IMOVIO launched today a smaller alternative to a subnotebook -- much smaller. The new iKIT is about the size of a PDA from ten years ago, but has a QWERTY keyboard and connects to the Internet at 3G speeds via your cell phone or Wi-Fi.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 275

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This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Linux package management cheatsheet, part 4

  • News: Upgrading Mandriva with mdkonline, Blu-ray sets for Debian "Lenny", Linux Mint 5 for 64-bit systems, interview with KPackageKit developers, K12Linux update
  • Released last week: NetBSD 4.0.1, Parted Magic 3.1
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3, Ubuntu 8.10 RC
  • New additions: BSDanywhere
  • New distributions: Bardinux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Kernel Log: Coming in 2.6.28 - Part 2: network infrastructure and network drivers

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Linux The commit flood for 2.6.28 during the current merge window doesn't look like ending soon – in the last 24 hours alone, Linus Torvalds has integrated a further 700 patches, most of them contributed by other kernel developers, into Linux's main development tree.

Ubuntu vs. XP From A Blogger’s Perspective

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Ubuntu I have an older Dell Inspiron 6000 that I recently decided to go true-blue dual boot with Ubuntu v8.04 and Windows XP Professional SP3. The first thing I found myself dealing with is that I can’t use Windows Live Writer in Ubuntu.

Lessons Linux Should Learn From Windows and Mac

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Linux Sometimes we can be pretty quick to dismiss the competition and really try to aggressively push the Linux ’cause’, if you get what I mean. We can see that Windows and Mac do a great number of things right, and not all of them are things that Linux gets perfect.

Mac, Linux, BSD open for attack: Kaspersky

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Security Looming attacks will soon pop the security bubble enjoyed by Linux and Macintosh users, according to Russian security expert Eugene Kaspersky.

OpenOffice 3 - Nice!

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OOo I have been using OpenOffice extensively for at least the last 3 years and seen many versions come out. In daily routine, people usually pay little attention to what new features their software updates bring, but when you look back and bunch years of continuous progress into a single, coherent thought, you get an impression.

Also: Openoffice 3.0 vs MS Office

Want to Laugh? Another Tall Tale About Where Linux Came From

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Linux This is so funny. Yet another "history" of Linux. To be fair, those Wall Street dudes are likely under a lot of stress nowadays. If he needs a job, maybe he should write a column with "Paul Murphy", who also comes up with his own histories on the birth of Linux.

odds & ends

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  • Linux Action Show Mini Episode 1

  • Novell Joins Moblin to Further Development of Linux-based Mobile Devices
  • Backup and Restore Package Lists in Ubuntu
  • Middle East lagging open source
  • Working with CSV files in Bash
  • Intrepid Ibex: Upgrade to Ubuntu 8.10 in 5 simple steps
  • Which is more relevant - iPhone or Linux?
  • Mozilla Messaging releases new Thunderbird 3 alpha
  • Andrew Lahdelt Timed the Market, but Missed the Mark on Linux
  • Problem Running Bash Script In Cron

Q&A: Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst

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Interviews In this candid interview with, Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst discusses why he thinks rival VMWare will fail, how the financial crisis will be good for open source, and why cloud computing will be the future.

Top 12 Most Absurd Quotes By Steve Ballmer

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Microsoft Yesterday, my post was about the latest stupid remarks by Steve Ballmer at the Gartner Symposium ITxpo. Today, we'll take a look at his all time most ridiculous quotes.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Google: Pixel 2, Xiaomi Kernel Source, David Kleidermacher on Security

  • Google Pixel 2 Portrait Mode Tech Is Now Open Source
    The tech behind the portrait mode on Google Pixel 2  has been made open source by the company. For those who not familiar with it, one of the main draw to the algorithm in the Pixel 2’s camera app is excellent subject isolation without needing additional apparatus such as specialized lens or second camera.
  • Xiaomi releases Oreo kernel source code for the Mi A1
    Xiaomi promised that the Mi A1 would receive Oreo by the end of 2017, and the company hit a buzzer-beater by rolling out Android 8.0 to the Android One device on December 30th. But the kernel source code was nowhere to be found, a violation of the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2), and an affront to the development and enthusiast community. It's about two-and-a-half months late, but Xiaomi has finally released the Android 8.0 Oreo source code for the Mi A1.
  • Google Says Android Is as Secure as Apple's iOS and Wants You to Know That
    Google's Android security chief David Kleidermacher told CNET today that the Linux-based Android mobile operating system the company develops for a wide range of devices is now as secure as Apple's iOS. Google recently published its "Android Security 2017 Year In Review" report where the company talks about how Android security has matured in the last few years and how it fights to find new ways to protect Android users from malware and all the other nasty stuff you obviously don't want to have on your mobile phone or tablet.

If you owned a 'fat' PlayStation 3 you could be entitled to $65 from Sony because of Linux option

Cast your mind back to when Sony released the original PlayStation 3, and you may well remember claims that the console was also a "computer". The claims were such that Sony suggested that owners could install Linux -- which, technically speaking, they could. However, installing Linux on a PS3 also posed something of a security issue, and Sony backtracked on the "Other OS" feature, killing it will a firmware update. Unsurprisingly, a lawsuit followed, and the result of this is that you could in line for a pay-out. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Zorin OS 12.3 Linux Distro Released: Download The Perfect Windows Replacement
    While listing out the best distros for a Linux beginner, the ease of use and installation are the most critical factors. Such qualities make distros like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Zorin OS the most recommended options. In case you’re also concerned about your privacy and security, a shift to the world of Linux becomes a more obvious option. Calling itself a replacement for Windows and macOS, Zorin OS has been established as a beginner-friendly option that offers a smooth ride while making the transition. The latest Zorin OS 12.3 release works to strengthen the basics of the operating system and polishes the whole experience.
  • Ramblings about long ago and far away
    I had originally run MCC (Manchester Computer Center Interim Linux) in college but when I moved it was easier to find a box of floppies with SLS so I had installed that on the 486. I would then download software source code from the internet and rebuild it for my own use using all the extra flags I could find in GCC to make my 20Mhz system seem faster. I instead learned that most of the options didn't do anything on i386 Linux at the time and most of my reports about it were probably met by eye-rolls with the people at Cygnus. My supposed goal was to try and set up a MUD so I could code up a text based virtual reality. Or to get a war game called Conquer working on Linux. Or maybe get xTrek working on my system. [I think I mostly was trying to become a game developer by just building stuff versus actually coding stuff. I cave-man debugged a lot of things using stuff I had learned in FORTRAN but it wasn't actually making new things.]
  • EzeeLinux Show 18.13 | Running Linux On Junk
    A talk about the advantages of running Linux on junk hardware.
  • Best 50 HD Wallpapers for Ubuntu
    Wallpapers are useful in many ways depending on the visual it contains for example if there is a motivational quote on it, it helps to motivate you. The images are the best type of wallpaper because they have an impact on the mind of a human being. So if you are a working professional and have to work continuously on a computer then your desktop cab be a source of inspiration and happiness. So today we are going to share 50 best HD Wallpapers for your Ubuntu which will keep your desktop fresh.
  • Ubuntu Tried Adding Synaptics Support Back To GNOME's Mutter
    GNOME developers previously dropped support for Synaptics and other input drivers from Mutter in favor of the universal libinput stack that is also Wayland-friendly. Canonical developers tried to get Synaptics support on X11 added back into Mutter but it looks clear now that was rejected. Canonical's Will Cooke reported in this week's Ubuntu happenings that they were trying to add upstream support for Synaptics to Mutter, complementing the libinput support. While it's great Canonical trying to contribute upstream to GNOME, Synaptics support was previously dropped as being a maintenance burden and with libinput support getting into rather good shape.
  • Long live Release Engineering
    y involvement in Fedora goes back to late 2003 early 2004 somewhere as a packager for I started by getting a few packages in to scratch some of my itches and I saw it as a way to give back to the greater open source community. Around FC3 somewhere I stepped up to help in infrastructure to rebuild the builders in plague, the build system we used before koji and that we used for EPEL(Something that I helped form) for awhile until we got external repo support in koji. I was involved in the implementation of koji in Fedora, I joined OLPC as a build and release engineer, where I oversaw a move of the OS they shipped from FC6 to F8, and laid a foundation for the move to F9. I left OLPC when Red Hat opensourced RHN Satellite as “spacewalk project” I joined Red Hat as the release engineer for both, after a brief period there was some reorganisation in engineering that resulted in me handing off the release engineering tasks to someone closer the the engineers working on the code. As a result I worked on Fedora full time helping Jesse Keating. When he decided to work on the internal migration from CVS to git I took over as the lead. [...] Recently I have accepted a Job offer to become the manager of a different team inside of Red Hat.

Linux 4.17 Spring Cleaning To Drop Some Old CPU Architectures and Recent Torvalds Interview

  • Linux 4.17 Spring Cleaning To Drop Some Old CPU Architectures
    Longtime Linux kernel developer Arnd Bergmann is working to drop a number of old and obsolete CPU architectures from the next kernel cycle, Linux 4.17. The obsolete CPU architectures set to be removed include Blackfin, CRIS, FR-V, M32R, MN10300, META (Metag), and TILE. Managing to escape its death sentence is the Unicore32 architecture with its port maintainer claiming it's still actively being used and maintained.
  • [Older] Linus Torvalds Interview by Kristaps

    Interviewer: we all know who Linus is, but not many people know he’s also a proficient diver. Why don’t we start at the beginning: where you first started diving, and when you started to take diving seriously.  

    Actually, it was related to open source, in some way. [...]