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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Songbird - Sleek , Simple and Feature rich cross-platform Music Player

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: I had reviewed Songbird close to two years back , and at that time Songbird was impressive but was bug ridden, lacked important features and certain degree of polishing which was expected from an application intended to be used on Desktops. Songbird 1.0 is an entirely different story altogether.

What this Firefox user misses about Chrome

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: Call me fickle, but I switched my default browser back to Firefox for the time being. In doing so, I discovered the features I really miss about Chrome.

New Features in OpenOffice.org 3.1, an Early Look

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: OpenOffice.org 3.1 is 65 days away, and developers are finishing up more than 1000 issues targeted for this Microsoft-Office-killer packing an army of new features, enhancements, and bug fixes.

Opera 10 Alpha - Preview

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Opera 10 is the next generation of the popular, closed-source web browser built in Qt, and available on UNIX (including both Linux and FreeBSD), Mac and Windows platforms.

What’s new in KDE 4.2? A Review:

Filed under
KDE

meldroc.com: Sometime around the end of the month, the KDE developers will unleash the official 4.2 release upon the world, and it will be picked up by your distro creator of choice sometime soon afterwards. At any rate, KDE 4.2 will include a bunch of new features, and some sorely needed bug-fixes. So, how does it hold up so far?

Setting Up the Ideal Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: After years of authorized and -- I admit -- the occasional unauthorized but non-tampering snooping, I'm overdue to offer reciprocity. I'm not naive enough to throw open my machine for everyone to examine online, but, over the years, I have developed several pages of hard-earned notes that I follow and revise whenever I buy and set up a new computer.

On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

happyassassin.net: People seem to believe Linux has some kind of special sauce that keeps them super-safe from malware. The problem is, no, no it doesn’t.

Watch Obama Inauguration on Linux with Moonlight

Filed under
Software

tirania.org/blog: I just wanted to confirm that you can watch today's Barack Obama Official Inauguration video stream using Moonlight on Linux/x86 and Linux/x86-64 systems.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fedora Announces The Moksha Project

  • Combine your partition space with mhddfs
  • The ping pong ends.. at Ubuntu
  • One Laptop Per Child: What Went Wrong
  • Ubuntu Man and Hardy Heron
  • Why I hate computers…
  • KDE 4.3 Sessions menu (Lancelot)
  • TechCrunch Web tablet - a waste of time and money?
  • Ubuntu and the French Revolution: A Study
  • Laptops, ergonomics, and batteries
  • ALSA 1.0.19 Released With Many Changes
  • Open source again
  • Tip of the Day: Easily Close a Port in Linux
  • The perfect storm for open source M&A?
  • Linux Outlaws 72 - Gotta Bloody Stick o' Gelignite

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Use Charm like a pro

  • Upgrading Dell BIOS from Linux (Deb-based systems)
  • SSHerminator - Nice split screen terminal emulator and SSH client
  • Fedora 10 Codecs with MPlayer
  • How to monitor your Linux machine with netstat
  • Remote Desktop Between Ubuntu/Linux and Windows, Part I
  • Running multiple instances of MySQL on the same machine
  • Adding a new hard drive to Ubuntu
  • Force USB Device Discovery in Ubuntu
  • Transfer Your Terminal with Screen
  • Print part of a file

Publicising a FOSS project

Filed under
OSS
SUSE

itwire.com: Joe "Zonker" Brockmeier, the senior manager for community relations at the "mixed source company ", Novell, spoke at the Australian national Linux conference today. Brockmeier's approach to publicity, sadly, mirrored outdated thinking predicated on stereotypes.

INTERVJU: Tom "Spot" Callaway, The Fedora Engineering Manager

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

hardware.no: Though sometimes described as the bleeding-edge testing ground to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (or RHEL for short), Fedora is one of the most popular Linux-distributions around. So what is it that makes this distribution tick? We've asked the Fedora Engineering Manager, Tom Callaway, some questions.

Getting things done on Linux

Filed under
Software

tectonic.co.za: A good to-do list manager can make all the difference to your productivity. While there isn’t a shortage of to-do managers available for Linux, Tasque obviously has a couple of advantages over many other tools.

Linux KDE 4.2 RC1: Photos

Filed under
KDE

zdnet.com.au: The latest version of the KDE desktop environment, mostly used on Linux, arrived last week (4.2 RC1), with the final product due on 22 January. We had a peek inside to see what this overhaul offers.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring - Alpha2 release available

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: The second pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring is now available. This alpha 2 version concentrates on updating to the major desktop components of the distribution.

The Linux KVM may change the way you use Linux

Filed under
Linux

Learn the advantages of Linux Kernal Virtual Machine

2008, the Buzzwords that were

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: The common buzzwords heard in the year 2008 were recession, credit-crunch, bankruptcy, bailout and others related to the financial markets as it was a year when the global economy faced huge downturn. Amidst this economic meltdown, Linux was another buzz.

Forrester: Netbooks confuse consumers

Filed under
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: Netbooks fill an important niche in the consumer PC market, but the way they are being marketed is causing confusion with consumers, says a Forrester analyst.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: VPNFilter, Encryption in GNU/Linux, Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints

  • [Crackers] infect 500,000 consumer routers all over the world with malware

    VPNFilter—as the modular, multi-stage malware has been dubbed—works on consumer-grade routers made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and on network-attached storage devices from QNAP, Cisco researchers said in an advisory. It’s one of the few pieces of Internet-of-things malware that can survive a reboot. Infections in at least 54 countries have been slowly building since at least 2016, and Cisco researchers have been monitoring them for several months. The attacks drastically ramped up during the past three weeks, including two major assaults on devices located in Ukraine. The spike, combined with the advanced capabilities of the malware, prompted Cisco to release Wednesday’s report before the research is completed.

  • Do Not Use sha256crypt / sha512crypt - They're Dangerous

    I'd like to demonstrate why I think using sha256crypt or sha512crypt on current GNU/Linux operating systems is dangerous, and why I think the developers of GLIBC should move to scrypt or Argon2, or at least bcrypt or PBKDF2.

  • Intel CPU Bug Affecting rr Watchpoints
    I investigated an rr bug report and discovered an annoying Intel CPU bug that affects rr replay using data watchpoints. It doesn't seem to be hit very often in practice, which is good because I don't know any way to work around it. It turns out that the bug is probably covered by an existing Intel erratum for Skylake and Kaby Lake (and probably later generations, but I'm not sure), which I even blogged about previously! However, the erratum does not mention watchpoints and the bug I've found definitely depends on data watchpoints being set. I was able to write a stand-alone testcase to characterize the bug. The issue seems to be that if a rep stos (and probably rep movs) instruction writes between 1 and 64 bytes (inclusive), and you have a read or write watchpoint in the range [64, 128) bytes from the start of the writes (i.e., not triggered by the instruction), then one spurious retired conditional branch is (usually) counted. The alignment of the writes does not matter, and it's not related to speculative execution.

In Memoriam: Robin "Roblimo" Miller, a Videographer and Free Software Champion

Videographer Robin Roblimo Miller

Robin "Roblimo" Miller was a clever, friendly, and very amicable individual who everyone I know has plenty of positive things to say about. I had the pleasure of speaking to him for several hours about anything from personal life and professional views. Miller was a very knowledgeable person whose trade as a journalist and video producer I often envied. I have seen him facing his critics in his capacity as a journalist over a decade ago when he arranged a debate about OOXML (on live radio). Miller, to me, will always be remembered as a strong-minded and investigative journalist who "did the right thing" as the cliché goes, irrespective of financial gain -- something which can sometimes be detrimental to one's longterm health. Miller sacrificed many of his later years to a cause worth fighting for. This is what we ought to remember him for. Miller was - and always will be - a FOSS hero.

May everything you fought for be fulfilled, Mr. Miller. I already miss you.

Today in Techrights

Tux Machines Privacy Statement

Summary: Today, May 25th, the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into full effect; we hereby make a statement on privacy AS a matter of strict principle, this site never has and never will accumulate data on visitors (e.g. access logs) for longer than 28 days. The servers are configured to permanently delete all access data after this period of time. No 'offline' copies are being made. Temporary logging is only required in case of DDOS attacks and cracking attempts -- the sole purpose of such access. Additionally, we never have and never will sell any data pertaining to anything. We never received demands for such data from authorities; even if we had, we would openly declare this (publicly, a la Canary) and decline to comply. Privacy is extremely important to us, which is why pages contain little or no cross-site channels (such as Google Analytics, 'interactive' buttons for 'social' media etc.) and won't be adding any. Google may be able to 'see' what pages people visit because of Google Translate (top left of every page), but that is not much worse than one's ISP 'seeing' the same thing. We are aware of this caveat. Shall readers have any further questions on such matters, do not hesitate to contact us.