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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu's Mir Gains Server-Side Platform Probing Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 10:24am
Story MakuluLinux Xfce 7.1 Released. Roy Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 10:11am
Story Linux Kernel 3.19-Rc6 Released Mohd Sohail 26/01/2015 - 8:10am
Blog entry Ubuntu Flavors 15.04 Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 Released Mohd Sohail 26/01/2015 - 3:35am
Story MBARI testing the waters with open source camera Rianne Schestowitz 26/01/2015 - 2:41am
Story Fixing unperceived errors in my X Windows configuration Fitzcarraldo 25/01/2015 - 11:38pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 25/01/2015 - 10:42pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/01/2015 - 10:41pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/01/2015 - 10:40pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/01/2015 - 10:02pm

6 Ways to Get Much More Out of GIMP

Filed under
GIMP

ostatic.com/blog: GIMP, the GNU Image Manipulation Program, is a long-standing and hugely respected open source graphics program, and many readers probably already use it. The GIMP site has many useful resources for the application, and there are also a lot of other places to visit for turning yourself into a power user.

Red Hat and Novell duke it out in real time

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: When it comes to processing financial transactions, money can be won or lost in milliseconds. That's why high throughput, low latency, and consistent latency for transactions are the name of the game. Financial institutions are fanatical about their market data and trading systems, and Linux distros want to cash in on that.

4000 Attendees at French Team Ubuntu Release Party

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Every 6 months, the French Team holds release parties. For Ubuntu 8.10, a release party was held in Paris with 12 install parties throughout France. 4000 people attended the event, which broke the record from last year, almost 3000 visitors!

Igniting Linux Desktop Security

Filed under
Software

securiteam.com: Long ago, my all-time favorite desktop firewall was none other than sygate pro (symantec junkies sought-and-destroyed a while back). But like most other desktop firewalls, sygate is/was windows only. But this article isn’t about just any desktop firewall; it is about Firestarter, the Linux GUI firewall solution.

Amarok gets a facelift

Filed under
Software

linux.com: After more than a year in development, Amarok, a multipurpose media player with a host of features, has issued release candidate code for version 2. It comes with a completely redesigned interface, and takes advantage of KDE 4's new libraries and interfaces.

Also: Hands-on: Amarok 2 rocks the house

Free Software Foundation Files Suit Against Cisco For GPL Violations

Filed under
OSS
Legal

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced that it has filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against Cisco.

Open source in a closed market

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet: In a truly open market the battle to set new mobile standards would be fairly clear. It’s not, because this is not an open market.

Can Firefox 3.1 pull me back from Chrome?

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.computerworld: As a formerly enthusiastic Firefox user, I'd been looking forward to version 3.1 eagerly. Now, however, after trying out Beta 2 and reading Preston Gralla's review, I'm not so sure.

The Inspiration behind Netbooks

Filed under
Hardware

businessweek.com: Suddenly, Netbooks are all the rage. Turns out the UMPC (ultramobile) form factors were a bit too small and too expensive to make a mass market, but the Netbook is JUST RIGHT.

Choosing your linux

Filed under
Linux

translxp.wordpress: Don’t have much experience on linux? Don’t have much time trying out? Well, if so, you’ll love searching for the right distribution that suits you in minutes with distribution comaparer and distribution choosers.

Chinese Linux hit by credit crunch

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linux has been doing pretty well in China, with recent year-on-year sales going through the roof. However, there can be no escaping the global economic crisis, not even for Chinese Linux.

Can SELINUX impose a better confidentiality over encryption?

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: SE Linux is the Security-Enhanced Linux project started by the NSA which lets you secure Linux at every echelon from the kernel up. SE Linux is in essence a defense against hackers giving users another stratum of protection to online information.

Broswer Wars Reloaded: Javascript speed, Acid tests

I should not show the IE 7 results, because they are embarrassing and Trolls will accuse me of being a zealot. But i can sense that other zealots' blood-lust is building up!! So here are the results:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KDE4Daily 4.2 Edition

  • KDE4 on Gentoo
  • AMD Catalyst 8.12 Linux Driver
  • Google, Mozilla Heat Up Browser Wars
  • Debian on a Dell E4300
  • My Thunderbird extensions
  • Programming GNOME applications with Vala
  • Nexuiz project is looking for developers, modelers, artists, etc
  • Red Hat Takes a Piece of Jaspersoft
  • End-of-Year Thoughts and Resources on Netbooks
  • Tux3 by Christmas?
  • Short Tip: import larger sets of ics files into kontact
  • Installing Condor the easy-easy way
  • Is This the Cloud OS You Wanted?
  • Whither open source in the land of leeches?
  • SELinux on openSUSE 11.1
  • OOo: outline numbering level attribute as part of paragraph style
  • The Impact Mozilla Challenge
  • GUI suite targets embedded Linux distro
  • Slice and Dice Images with ImageMagick
  • Linux Factoids - Your Time To Live Is Gonna Come
  • Quickly create a video presentation of your Linux desktop
  • Ubuntu Server: Suspend/Hibernate for Jaunty?
  • Why DU And DF Display Different Values On Linux
  • A walk down memory lane ... with GNOME and Stormy
  • One step closer...
  • Hardware Review: Yoggie Open Soho Firewall
  • Compiz-Fusion 'n Awn!!!
  • Configuring a chrooted Ubuntu installation
  • YouTube and GNU/Linux: download and convert videos the easy way

I switched to Debian, Fedora, Kubuntu and …

Filed under
Linux

technet.147120.com: Somehow I managed to trash the hard drive in my newly converted Debian box. With a new (to me) 320 GiB drive I just couldn’t resist a multiboot machine.

Unison and Canonical’s Ubuntu Attack Microsoft Exchange

Filed under
Software

thevarguy.com: Unison Technologies, with an assist from Canonical and Ubuntu Linux, says it is “launching a major threat to Microsoft Exchange.” Hmmm. The VAR Guy has heard similar grandstanding before from a range of companies. But Unison has caught our resident blogger’s attention a few times. Here’s why.

Mozilla Security Chief Calls It Quits

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: Window Snyder, the head of security at Mozilla Corp., will resign her position at the end of the year, she said in a blog post Wednesday.

Slackware 12.2 Released

Filed under
Slack

slackware.com: Well folks, it's that time to announce a new stable Slackware release again. So, without further ado, announcing Slackware version 12.2! Since we've moved to supporting the 2.6 kernel series exclusively (and fine-tuned the system to get the most out of it), we feel that Slackware 12.2 has many improvements over our last release (Slackware 12.1) and is a must-have upgrade for any Slackware user.

K12Linux founders hand off project to the Fedora community

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Two Oregon educators who founded the K12Linux project seven years ago are glad that they have been able to hand that project over to Fedora, the home they always meant for K12Linux to have.

Will OpenSolaris 2008.11 Attract Linux Users?

Filed under
OS

earthweb.com: This second OpenSolaris release comes with even more software packages than before, more hardware support, and a few nifty features revolving around ZFS. The question we cannot avoid is, “can it replace Linux?”

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More in Tux Machines

Software: LibreNMS, Pidgin, Wireshark and More

  • Featured Network Monitoring Tool for Linux
    LibreNMS is an open source, powerful and feature-rich auto-discovering PHP based network monitoring system which uses the SNMP protocol. It supports a broad range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and many more.
  • Get started with Pidgin: An open source replacement for Skype
    Technology is at an interesting crossroads, where Linux rules the server landscape but Microsoft rules the enterprise desktop. Office 365, Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, OneDrive, Outlook... the list goes on of Microsoft software and services that dominate the enterprise workspace. What if you could replace that proprietary software with free and open source applications and make them work with an Office 365 backend you have no choice but to use? Buckle up, because that is exactly what we are going to do with Pidgin, an open source replacement for Skype.
  • Wireshark, World’s Most Popular Network Protocol Analyzer, Gets Major Release
    Wireshark, world’s most popular open-source network protocol analyzer, has been updated to a new stable series, versioned 2.6, a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, as well as support for new protocols. A lot of user interface improvements have been made since Wireshark 2.5, and Wireshark 2.6 appears to be the last release that will support the legacy GTK+ graphical user interface, as the development team announced it wouldn't be supported in the next major series, Wireshark 3.0. New features in Wireshark 2.6 include support for HTTP Request sequences, support for MaxMind DB files, Microsoft Network Monitor capture file support, as well as LoRaTap capture interface support. The IP map feature was removed, as well as support for the GeoIP and GeoLite Legacy databases.
  • A look at terminal emulators, part 2
    A comparison of the feature sets for a handful of terminal emulators was the subject of a recent article; here I follow that up by examining the performance of those terminals. This might seem like a lesser concern, but as it turns out, terminals exhibit surprisingly high latency for such fundamental programs. I also examine what is traditionally considered "speed" (but is really scroll bandwidth) and memory usage, with the understanding that the impact of memory use is less than it was when I looked at this a decade ago (in French).
  • Counting beans—and more—with Beancount
    It is normally the grumpy editor's job to look at accounting software; he does so with an eye toward getting the business off of the proprietary QuickBooks application and moving to something free. It may be that Beancount deserves a look of that nature before too long but, in the meantime, a slightly less grumpy editor has been messing with this text-based accounting tool for a variety of much smaller projects. It is an interesting system, with a lot of capabilities, but its reliance on hand-rolling for various pieces may scare some folks off.
  • Firefox release speed wins
    Sylvestre wrote about how we were able to ship new releases for Nightly, Beta, Release and ESR versions of Firefox for Desktop and Android in less than a day in response to the pwn2own contest. People commented on how much faster the Beta and Release releases were compared to the ESR release, so I wanted to dive into the releases on the different branches to understand if this really was the case, and if so, why? [..] We can see that Firefox 59 and 60.0b4 were significantly faster to run than ESR 52 was! What's behind this speedup?
  • LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 Is Ready To Roll For Advancing The Open-Source Office
    LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 was tagged overnight as the first development release towards this next updated open-source office suite release succeeding the big LibreOffice 6.0. LibreOffice 6.1.0 is set to be released by the middle of August and for that to happen the alpha release has now been hit followed by the beta release this time next month, and the release candidates to come through the month of July. The feature freeze and branching occurs at next month's beta stage while the hard code freeze is expected for the middle of July.

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.