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Thursday, 21 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Companies That Support Linux: Rackspace Roy Schestowitz 12/06/2014 - 12:48pm
Story Linux hiring frenzy: Why open source devs are being bombarded with offers to jump ship Roy Schestowitz 12/06/2014 - 12:42pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 12/06/2014 - 12:26pm
Story Galaxy S5 vs. Nexus 5 vs. iPhone 5s Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 8:38am
Story Fast-boot, open spec COM includes FPGA Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 8:22am
Story Docker libcontainer unities Linux container powers Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 7:20am
Story Unity 8 Desktop Preview Image Available For Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 7:16am
Story Intel Core i7 4790K: Devil's Canyon Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 6:40am
Story OPENDAYLIGHT DEVELOPER SPOTLIGHT: LUIS GOMEZ Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 6:35am
Story 16 FOSSisms all educators should know Rianne Schestowitz 11/06/2014 - 6:29am

Linux XP 2008: Now with more Vista

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Linux XP is a strange beast. From what I gather it tries very hard to emulate the look and feel of Microsoft Windows in order to make the transition to Linux easier to the Microsoft-familiar. If someone wants to learn Linux, great, but they should learn proper Linux, not this bastardized Frankenstein monster.

KDE 4: Key Improvements and User Tips

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: After three weeks of using KDE 4 on my laptop, I continue to find new features and changes. Increasingly, I'm looking at KDE 4 as a statement about what a desktop should be, and contrasting it with my own ideas on the subject.

Keep These Tips in Mind When Choosing a Distribution

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Jack Wallen wrote a great article over at Tech Republic outlining 10 things you need to consider when choosing a Linux distribution. He makes some great points, and there's a couple more I'd throw in as well.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 248

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: Testing, one two three...

  • News: DPL election results, CentOS vs Ubuntu, gOS Space, Eee PC SDK, Darkstar's Disk Manager, interviews with Jeremy Katz and Bill Reynolds
  • Released last week: Mandriva Linux 2008.1, sidux 2008-01
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 11.0 Beta 1, Ubuntu 8.04 RC
  • New distributions: AltimatOS, IntuxOS
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Fluendo integrates codec manager with Mandriva Spring 2008

Filed under
MDV

cbronline.com: Fluendo, a Spanish provider of codec products, in partnership with open source technology provider Mandriva, has introduced Codeina, a codec manager, which has been integrated with the new Mandriva Linux Spring 2008 release.

The missing five-minute Linux manual for morons

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: It is time to wake up and smell the elephant in the room. Vista is struggling. Of course there is an alternative, but the Wii does not yet quite hack it. So, for the time being, I'm afraid we are all back on re-evaluation-of-Linux duty. Never mind. I've already done the spadework. Let me lead you through a few simple steps to a full-on Open Source experience.

My kid hates Linux

Filed under
Linux

Christopher Dawson (zdnet): My oldest son is a fairly typical 15 year-old end user. He’s on the computer all the time, has a decent idea how to get things done, and is largely not interested in the inner workings of hardware or operating system. He, like most other users, just wants the computer to work.

Finding a Linux-powered laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

scottnesbitt.net: Until recently, there were only a few places from which you could buy a Linux-powered laptop. While you can’t get one at your local electronics or computer store, there are more options available.

Customize your Firefox browser with Personas

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: If you like to customize your applications' appearance, then Firefox themes probably haven't impressed you. Although there are hundreds of themes available, typically all they allow users to do is change the icons and background color of your browser -- not too exciting. Personas for Firefox offers a new way to customize the browser.

Also: * Updated Web Browsers: Which One Works Best?
* Better copy/paste in Firefox
* Firefox Introduces New Rickroll Protection

Living a life without a Hard Disk

Filed under
Linux

anojrs.blogspot: Life without a hard disk is tough.. but fun in many ways.. Here is what you could do, to keep working on your computer:

My review of gOS Space

Filed under
Linux

farbeyondtheedgeofreason.blogspot: In my opinion, the original gOS was a great Linux distribution for the average computer user - someone who used it to write up a few documents, send a few emails, and surf the Internet a bit. But now, gOS Space is here, and it's a radical departure from the original. So, once again I downloaded a copy and gave it a try.

Overview of Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron on the Dell 1501

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu1501.com: Hardy Heron is the Ubuntu release that Dell Inspiron 1501 owners have been waiting for. If you were hesitant about trying Ubuntu on your 1501, rest assured, it takes minimal skill and computer knowledge to setup.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Server Guide: Part 3

  • cpufreqd - How to configure you cpu speed
  • scanner buttons on Gentoo
  • Howto: Mount .ISO's in Ubuntu Linux The Easy way
  • Recovering Files on Linux
  • Tip: official Firefox on Debian
  • 20 major Ubuntu resources you should know about
  • Speech synthesis on Ubuntu

Flipping the Linux switch: openSUSE, geeko of many colors

Filed under
SUSE

downloadsquad.com: The last openSUSE install I tried for any real length of time was 10.1. I installed 10.3 a month or two back to try some things, and found, though it's really usable, there wasn't anything that made me want to say, "Screw Ubuntu." But I wanted to try openSUSE again.

A Few more thoughts on Kubuntu 8.04 KDE 4 Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

wheatlandlinux.wordpress: I have been using Kubuntu 8.04 KDE4 for a week now it runs better than Kubuntu 7.10. Kubuntu 7.10 was so horribly slow and full of bugs. I fail to understand how anyone could have used it. But the newest version of Kubuntu is actually nice.

Educational programs in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: What does education have to do with Linux, or free software in general, you ask? In this article, I am going to answer this question and describe available open source educational programs for your kids.

Drigg (the pligg alternative) vs. Pligg: why should people switch?

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I am the main developer for Drigg. I donated probably more than 1000 hours of my life to the Drigg project, because I believed in it. After reviewing existing CMSs out there, I believe that Drigg is the best system available today for people who want to create Digg-like sites.

About Linux Distros: Ubuntu and CentOS

Filed under
Linux

activoinc.com/blog: A few weeks ago, we setup a new production LAMP server to host a few of our client’s sites, medium size eCommerce websites. I wanted to share our experience as we came across the three big (and free) Linux distributions while we evaluated and setup the machines.

“Linux” and “Linux Mint”

Filed under
Linux

linuxmint.com: The Linux Mark Institute (LMI) is the exclusive licensor of the Linux trademark on behalf of its owner, Linus Torvalds. For “Linux Mint” to protect its name and be recognized as a trademark we had to get the approval of the LMI so we could use the term “Linux”.

What Makes a Desktop Look Nice

Filed under
Software

theunixgeek.blogspot: Have you ever thought about what makes your desktop look nice, and why many people may criticize, for example, Vista's UI? I decided to come up with a list of what seems to be that makes up a nice-looking desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft EEE

  • Why the Windows Subsystem for Linux Matters to You – Even if You Don’t Use it [Ed: Microsoft pulling an EEE on GNU/Linux matters. Sure it does... while suing GNU/Linux with software patents Microsoft says it "loves Linux".]
  • Canonical Teams Up with Microsoft to Enable New Azure Tailored Ubuntu Kernel
    In a joint collaboration with Microsoft's Azure team, Canonical managed to enable a new Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel in the Ubuntu Cloud Images for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on Azure starting today, September 21, 2017. The Azure tailored Ubuntu kernel is now enabled by default for the Ubuntu Cloud images running the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system on Microsoft's Azure cloud computing platform, and Canonical vows to offer the same level of support as the rest of its Ubuntu kernels until the operating system reaches end of life.

Servers: Kubernetes, Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), and Sysadmin 101

  • Kubernetes Snaps: The Quick Version
    When we built the Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes (CDK), one of our goals was to provide snap packages for the various Kubernetes clients and services: kubectl, kube-apiserver, kubelet, etc. While we mainly built the snaps for use in CDK, they are freely available to use for other purposes as well. Let’s have a quick look at how to install and configure the Kubernetes snaps directly.
  • Kubernetes is Transforming Operations in the Enterprise
    At many organizations, managing containerized applications at scale is the order of the day (or soon will be). And few open source projects are having the impact in this arena that Kubernetes is. Above all, Kubernetes is ushering in “operations transformation” and helping organizations make the transition to cloud-native computing, says Craig McLuckie co-founder and CEO of Heptio and a co-founder of Kubernetes at Google, in a recent free webinar, ‘Getting to Know Kubernetes.’ Kubernetes was created at Google, which donated the open source project to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.
  • Kubernetes gains momentum as big-name vendors flock to Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Like a train gaining speed as it leaves the station, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation is quickly gathering momentum, attracting some of the biggest names in tech. In the last month and a half alone AWS, Oracle, Microsoft, VMware and Pivotal have all joined. It’s not every day you see this group of companies agree on anything, but as Kubernetes has developed into an essential industry tool, each of these companies sees it as a necessity to join the CNCF and support its mission. This is partly driven by customer demand and partly by the desire to simply have a say in how Kubernetes and other related cloud-native technologies are developed.
  • The Cloud-Native Architecture: One Stack, Many Options
    As the chief technology officer of a company specialized in cloud native storage, I have a first hand view of the massive transformation happening right now in enterprise IT. In short, two things are happening in parallel right now that make it radically simpler to build, deploy and run sophisticated applications. The first is the move to the cloud. This topic has been discussed so much that I won’t try to add anything new. We all know it’s happening, and we all know that its impact is huge.
  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up
    I hope this description of levels in systems administration has been helpful as you plan your own career. When it comes to gaining experience, nothing quite beats making your own mistakes and having to recover from them yourself. At the same time, it sure is a lot easier to invite battle-hardened senior sysadmins to beers and learn from their war stories. I hope this series in Sysadmin 101 fundamentals has been helpful for those of you new to the sysadmin trenches, and also I hope it helps save you from having to learn from your own mistakes as you move forward in your career.

Databases: PostgreSQL 10 RC1 and Greenplum

  • PostgreSQL 10 RC1 Released
    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the first release candidate of version 10 is available for download. As a release candidate, 10 RC 1 should be identical to the final release of the new version. It contains fixes for all known issues found during testing, so users should test and report any issues that they find.
  • PostgreSQL 10 Release Candidate 1 Arrives
    PostgreSQL 10 has been queuing up improvements to declarative partitioning, logical replication support, an improved parallel query system, SCRAM authentication, performance speed-ups, hash indexes are now WAL, extended statistics, new integrity checking tools, smart connection handling, and many other promising improvements. Our earlier performance tests of Postgre 10 during its beta phase showed some speed-ups over PostgreSQL 9.
  • Pivotal Greenplum Analytic Database Adds Multicloud Support
    Pivotal’s latest release of its Greenplum analytic database includes multicloud support and, for the first time, is based entirely on open source code. In 2015, the company open sourced the core of Pivotal Greenplum as the Greenplum Database project. “This is the first commercially available release that we are shipping with the open source project truly at its core,” said Elisabeth Hendrickson, VP of data research and development at Pivotal.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support
    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch. The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.
  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support
    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support. Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.
  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.
  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.