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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SolusOS Eveline 1.2 Review srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 5:41pm
Story The inner workings of openSUSE srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 5:39pm
Story Why Linux on the desktop is still struggling srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 5:37pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 2:13pm
Story 10 award-winning open source apps to try today srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 2:31am
Story KDE On Wayland Won't Happen Anytime Soon srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 2:23am
Story But what happened to the desktop? srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 2:20am
Story Experimental Animation and Video Techniques in Linux srlinuxx 21/09/2012 - 2:17am
Story Should the root account be disabled in Fedora 18? srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 5:46pm
Story A glimpse of Mandriva 2012 Alpha1 srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 5:39pm

AMD Radeon HD 2000 Series & Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Since January of this year we have been telling you that AMD has been silently working on R600 (Radeon HD 2000) support for their proprietary Linux "fglrx" driver. However, for the end-user the support isn't complete and still equates to being useless. But how does the recently announced Avivo R500 driver function with the newer R600 series?

Beryl: Eye Candy (and More) for Linux

Filed under
Software

daniweb.com: Over the past few years, 3-D rendering in window managers has become a new trend in the desktop environment. Linux users do not have to feel left out if they too want their desktop to be a little prettier. Beryl (formerly Compiz) gives many customizable features for users that want 3-D rendering in Gnome, KDE, or other window managers.

Links I Haven't Linked To

Filed under
News

Here's a bunch of links to stories that I've had open for a day or so and haven't had a chance to publish:

Improving Linux font rasterization?

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: Many people are unsatisfied with the existing ways of font display systems on Linux. A research paper from Anti-Grain now showed easy but powerful text rasterization improvements. However, the answer from the FreeType developers is a bit sobering.

OpenSUSE LiveCD Installer

Filed under
SUSE

snorp.net: It’s still in early development and has lots of hacks to make things work, but it does manage to install a working system onto your machine. The installation itself is really pretty simple.

101 Ubuntu Tips, Tricks and Tutorials

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.lxpages.com: In this article we’ve compiled 101 list of Ubuntu tutorials. If you’re thinking of switching to Ubuntu from Windows, don’t waste your time thinking too much. Switch to Ubuntu now and you’ll never think about going back.

Openbox window manager grows up

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you want an adaptable window manager that doesn't drain your resources, try Openbox. Its latest version, 3.4.2, released this month, has several visual improvements and dozens of new usable features.

Ubuntu Linux's Achilles' Heel: It's Tough To Install On Laptops

Filed under
Ubuntu

Information Week: The wildly popular Linux distro isn't all it's cracked up to be, especially if you try to install it on a laptop, our reviewer Alex Wolfe finds. Come along on his Ubuntu safari, as he hacks his way through bug-fraught installation attempts.

Tux Paint gets a face lift

Filed under
Software

DesktopLinux: Five years after the debut of its popular open-source drawing program for children, New Breed Software announced the release of Tux Paint 0.9.17.

Linux: Granular

Filed under
Linux

dailykos.com: Granular offers a visually stunning KDE, certainly the nicest implementation of it in any distro I've yet reviewed; once everything is configured, you enter an alabaster screen that loads all the modules necessary to run the liveCD.

BA in BS on the OBS

Filed under
SUSE

wafaa.eu: The guys and gals over at openSUSE have been beavering away at enhancing a tool that is invaluable to the Bongo Project and many many others - the openSUSE Build Service (OBS for short). One of those enhancements is enabling statistics so packagers can see if the sweat and tears has been worth it.

How Microsoft crushed Linux's Chinese rebellion

Filed under
Microsoft

salon: Somehow, facing a market where piracy was rampant and the government openly pro-Linux, Microsoft turned it around. China, says Gates, will one day be Microsoft's biggest market.

TinyMe - The little distro that could

Filed under
Linux

Raiden's Realm: Having become a fan of PcLinuxOS after a recent review of their 2007 version, I've followed its development with interest. One of those is TinyMe, a live cd derivative of PCLOS, that offers you the best of its parent, with the small size common to "lite" distributions or "distros" as they're more commonly called.

Dual-booting XP and Linux - It’s really easy!

Filed under
HowTos

zdnet blogs: Over the past few weeks several people have asked me if it’s possible to set up a Windows XP/Linux dual-boot system on a PC that already has Windows XP installed on it, and if it’s possible, how easy is the process.

Amarok 2.0 Jingle Contest

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The Amarok team needs your help. Amarok are looking for a new, shiny and fresh jingle to play at first start of Amarok 2.0 and are holding a contest to find one.

Catalog shopping comes to open-source software

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: A free beta Web site unveiled yesterday from open-source consulting firm Optaros Inc. is designed to tackle that problem. The site, Enterprise Open Source Directory, is billed as a one-stop information repository on some 300 enterprise-ready open-source applications.

Lenovo Unveils Its Highest Performing Notebook: A Linux Workstation

Filed under
Hardware

Information Week: Lenovo on Tuesday introduced its highest performing notebook, a Linux mobile workstation powered by an Intel Centrino Pro processor.

Easy CD ripping with Konqueror

Filed under
HowTos

ITtoolbox Blogs: We live in a world of sound. Many sounds are jarring and loud like traffic or construction work. Other sounds are dull and boring like elevator music. Still more sounds are pleasant. The biggest problem is how to get the collection of silver plastic disks converted to electronic form for those portable grooving machines.

A beginner’s introduction to the GNU/Linux command line, Part II

Filed under
HowTos

FreeSoftware Mag: Your GNU/Linux computer is an amazing machine. It can display images. It can run programs. It can perform dozens of functions all at the same time. How can you keep track of all this activity? By monitoring the processes that your computer runs, and one of the best ways to monitor and control processes is by using the command line.

How “Wintel thinking” reduces productivity

Filed under
Misc

Paul Murphy: For many jobs there’s a PC way and a Unix way. For example, I write these blogs using vi under either CDE (Solaris 10) or Gnome (Solaris 9) and just embed references and format information as I go along. The result is extremely portable because the text is independent of the format.

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More in Tux Machines

CentOS vs Ubuntu: Which one is better for a server

Finally decided to get a VPS but can’t decide which Linux distro to use? We’ve all been there. The choice may even be overwhelming, even for Linux distros, considering all the different flavors and distros that are out there. Though, the two most widely used and most popular server distros are CentOS and Ubuntu. This is the main dilemma among admins, both beginners and professionals. Having experience with both (and more) distros, we decided to do a comparison of CentOS and Ubuntu when used for a server. Read more

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games