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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ben Balter: Contractors Should Tap Open Source for IT Maturity Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 8:26pm
Story NVIDIA Presents Its Driver Plans To Support Mir/Wayland & KMS On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 8:24pm
Story Mozilla Wags Finger at Advertising Community Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 8:23pm
Story Tah: an Open Source BLE Arduino-compatible Board Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 8:18pm
Story Linux Kernel Developer Work Spaces, Unplugged (Video): John Linville Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 8:04pm
Story Open source interest at Pinterest Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:58pm
Story Epiphany Web Review Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:51pm
Story TuxArena | Email Clients for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:42pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:22pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/10/2014 - 7:21pm

gOS 3 Gadgets (beta) targets Linux beginners and Google Gadgets lovers

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: I first heard of gOS when it was chosen to power the $199 Wal-Mart gPC. The third iteration of the OS, gOS 3.0 "Gadgets" Beta, was released last week. It's a great Web-focused desktop, but it doesn't offer much to experienced or current Ubuntu users.

Also: A video tour of gOS Gadgets 3 (beta)

Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

  • First look at Ubuntu Intrepid Alpha 4
  • How to install ubuntu: a painless procedure
  • How to install a package in Ubuntu

ISO's Day of Shame

Filed under
OSS
  • ISO's Day of Shame

  • Not very appealing: ISO/IEC kicks out appeals
  • ISO, IEC reject appeals, approve OOXML spec

The end run around the OS is underway

blogs.zdnet: The operating system may be losing its luster. In fact, you could argue that the operating system–Linux, OS X and Windows–will become an application that just happens to boot first. And hardware vendors are on to the OS’s diminishing importance.

What Comes After the Windows Era?

linuxjournal.com: As a computer journalist for the last 25 years, I've received a lot of review copies of software. As something of an obsessive magpie, I've tended to keep most of it. Until yesterday, that is, when I finally threw out all those copies. What's makes this little spring-cleaning exercise particularly apt as well as cathartic is that all of us - and not just me - may finally be witnessing the end of the Windows era.

Linux community often tapped for beta testing

zdnetasia.com: It is common for the open source community to be called upon by vendors--including proprietary vendors--to be beta testers for Linux releases, according to an industry player.

Powerful graphical tools for Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Linux has a bad reputation of having to use the Command Line Interface (CLI) to do anything really useful. In this article I will talk about some graphical interfaces for tools to get those "useful" things done.

Will Linux Ever Be a Contender?

Filed under
Linux

geeknewscentral.com: I read an article earlier this week saying that Linux sees a Windows Free world. Well if that's true, I would have to wonder what people would go to, because Linux is not it. At least, not now.

What Linux Will Look Like In 2012?

beranger.org: Since everybody seems be be anxious to comment an article from Information Week: What Linux Will Look Like In 2012, here's my take on how a typical, über-productive Linux desktop will look like in 2012:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Aria2 - high speed command line download utility in Debian

  • Set up your firewall with Firewall Builder
  • Opera 9.52 RC1
  • OS implementation is another netbook differentiator
  • Submit your nominations for the 2008 Free Software Awards
  • Linux Review 10- OpenSUSE 11.0
  • Fluendo walks the line between free and proprietary codecs
  • Learn about the Open Source Census (video)
  • Mixed reactions to open source plan for schools
  • Plumber's 350 Linux desktops bonanza
  • Funny Things to do under Linux Terminal
  • 8 Ways to Showcase Your Open Source Skills and Get Hired
  • DebConf Gallery

The Ubuntu Artwork Circus

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonreagan.wordpress: It had been decided to create a new theme after each Long Term Support release, meaning that starting with Ubuntu 8.10, a new theme will be released, and there will be no new theme until after the next LTS release in 2010. During that period of time, the theme is fixed to be more appealing and complete.

Torvalds on Linux Security, Masturbating Monkeys, Whores and Idiots

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linus Torvalds is a Finnish born software engineer best known for two things: kick starting the development of the Linux kernel, and owning the Linux trademark. Actually, make that three things. Torvalds has recently become very well known for speaking his mind...

Shuttleworth and Ubuntu keep moving on up

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ten years from now, if Linux has managed to gain something like 10 per cent or more of the desktop market and continues to maintain its lead in the server market, one person would have to take a goodly share of the credit - Mark Shuttleworth.

Tux3 Hierarchical Structure

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "It is about time to take a step back and describe what I have been implementing," began Daniel Phillips, referring to his new Tux3 filesystem. He provided a simple ASCII diagram that detailed the filesystem's hierarchical structure, describing each of the elements.

Why the F.U.D. against OpenGL 3.0?

Filed under
Software

zerias.blogspot: One of the big announcements at this years SIGGRAPH was the release of the OpenGL 3.0 specification. OpenGL is the definitive open-standard Application Interface for graphics in the computing industry, and is supported on hardware platforms ranging from the cellphone sector to the high end gaming console.

A sneak peak into Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • A sneak peak into Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex

  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex Alpha 4
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Screenshot Gallery: New Human-Murrine Theme
  • Why It’s Okay for Oracle, SAP to Skip Ubuntu (for Now)
  • Introduction and History of Kubuntu

Kernel space: Virus scanning API spawns security debate

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Should Linux include a virus scanning layer? Kernel developers debate the best way to protect virus-vulnerable OSs from malware stored on a Linux server.

Responsible Disclosure, and Amarok 1.4.10

Filed under
Software

amarok.kde.org/blog: Yesterday we released Amarok 1.4.10, an unanticipated security release. From the Release Anouncement you may notice that we gave thanks to Google Alerts for notifying us of this vulnerability. This was perfectly accurate.

Mark Shuttleworth's evolving Ubuntu desktop war

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Asay: I've been very fortunate to get to spend some time with Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, during my trip to Argentina. One question we discussed at length: what is Mark's ambition for Ubuntu?

Interview with the Lead developer of Ubuntu Desktop Linux

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

hardware.no: Previously, we've interviewed the lead-developers of Arch and Gobo Linux. Two distributions for the more advanced users out there. This time, we're going in the complete opposite direction to understand more about a user friendly Linux-distribution: Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.