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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Handbrake 0.93 released, capitulates on DVD decryption

cnet.com: Handbrake, the closest thing to entertainment manna we have, has released the newest version of its open-source DVD ripping software, version 0.93. There's just one problem: it no longer rips DVDs. At least, not the kind you'd want to rip.

Stage Two of Open Source Evolution

Filed under
OSS

itworld.com: We have always said that Open Source could likely follow the evolution pattern of the PC's introduction during the mainframe era. For those of us who believed in Open Source in the "birth" stage, we knew the day would come where nearly every firm would be using Open Source in some way. It would be the sign that we had achieved the magical second stage - The Toe Hold.

Alternate Linux desktops

Filed under
Software

linuxpoison.blogspot: Most Linux users are familiar with KDE and GNOME. If you have some old PC with minimum hardware and want to run GUI on it then in this case the list of window manager provided below will help you to chose one ..

Forensic investigation using free Linux tools

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux-tip.net: An administrator of a company has been accused of hoarding illegal material of questionable moral content on his company network system. You have been called upon to examine the suspect server and unearth evidence related to the said illegal material. Your boss have told you that you are not allowed to shutdown the server.

Let’s talk about Python 3.0

Filed under
Software

b-list.org: I really like Python. It’s my language of choice for new projects, my language of choice for hacking up quick things to play with and the language I get to work with every day at my job. Python fits my brain in ways that no other programming language ever has. But

Linus Torvalds: Life is good again...

Filed under
Linux

...because it looks like we figured out what the suspend/resume problem was. And as suspected, the actual resource code had nothing what-so-ever to do with it, and was apparently just a trigger for timing.

7 Best Free/Open-source Image Viewers for Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: An image viewer (also known as image browser) is a desktop application that can quickly display or handle stored graphical images in different graphics file formats. It can render images according to properties of the display such as display resolution, color depth, and color profile. Other image viewers have advanced features like editing and web publishing.

Linux vs. Binary Blobs, or, Ideology vs. Reality

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: As Bruce Byfield notes in a recent essay, there’s been a bit of discussion lately about the presence of ‘binary blobs‘ in the Linux kernel. But the larger question, perhaps, is whether or not software freedom really matters so much to mainstream Linux users in the first place.

The Macbook Experiment: Fedora 10 for Two Days

tuxgeek.me: After trying Ubuntu 8.10 for two days on my Macbook, which proved to be a success, I now take Fedora 10 for a spin. Read on to see how my two days experience with this Linux distro was like.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • An Overview Of Recent KDE 4 Development

  • Implications of startups choosing open source
  • WINE 1.1.10 Brings Improved 64-Bit Support
  • We need solutions to industry 'bugs,' not critics
  • KDE Videocast Episode 4, December 6
  • Command not found
  • Stable kernel 2.6.27.8
  • Second Firefox 3.1 beta under starters order
  • the linux desktop’s change problem
  • Top of the world, ma! (Monitoring software)
  • Ding Dong the Emeralds Back Compiz
  • The Status of PCLinuxOS 2008/2009
  • Richard Stallman supports Creative Commons. Do you?
  • Combined KDE and Gnome developers meeting
  • Is there really a ‘relationship’ between Linux and Windows?
  • Open source and circling the drain
  • Music Studio Software: Buzztard
  • New version 5.2.7 of PHP has improved stability and security
  • Radeon Driver Gets Tear-Free X-Video
  • Teaching Thunderbird to Tango
  • Post 2.0.0 Git Vaults, Amarok Urls and Bookmarks

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 3 ways to keep safe your files

  • Tar Extract a Single File(s) From a Large Tarball
  • Getting Clock to Display Temp, Weather & Multiple Timezone in Ubuntu
  • Installing Fedora 10 Step by step
  • Dynamic Theming in Drupal 6 - Part 2
  • Keeping an eye on your Web proxy usage with Squid Graph
  • Start using crontab for automation

Reasons to Switch from OS X or Windows to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

chris.pirillo.com: All too often, popular tech-blogs engage in the old and tired debate about why you should switch to OS X or stay with Windows. The other alternative, the one that both Microsoft and Apple are afraid to mention, is GNU/Linux.

Songbird 1.0

Filed under
Software

linuxowns.wordpress: After a long period of beta versions, Songbird 1.0 is out. The big question is: is it any good? Let’s find out.

Ilumina TV Runs On Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

technology.inquirer.net: The Ilumina's basic component is its 32-inch LCD TV panel. Inside it are computer parts that run a scaled-down version of Ubuntu Linux operating system.

First Look: Fedora 10 OS

Filed under
Linux

Redmond Channel Partner: Fedora 10, a Linux-based desktop operating system sponsored by Red Hat, was released late last month by the Fedora Project. This version of the open source OS, code-named "Cambridge," has some new features that I was eager to try. I used the 700-MB live CD for installation and testing.

KDE 4.2 beta 1 on Gentoo

Filed under
KDE

kev009.com: KDE 4.2 is set for release on January 27th. Eager to see what is new and improved, I installed beta 1 on my Gentoo box. This is a snapshot of the current development tree that will eventually be released as KDE 4.2.

Also: Review - KDE 4 - Linux GUI interface - SUCKS

Michael Robertson Loses Motion in Dispute over Linspire's Missing Assets

Filed under
Linux

kevincarmony.blogspot: I have some good news to report to the 100 some-odd shareholders who remain in the dark about Linspire's missing cash and assets...

Happy metrics on Mandriva community growth

Filed under
MDV

Vincent Danen posted some numbers about the decline of posts to Mandriva's mailing lists. However, this is not evidence of a decline in the community - it simply means they all moved elsewhere. Specifically, to the forums.

The Perfect Desktop - Fedora 10 (GNOME)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Fedora 10 desktop (GNOME) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Loving KDE 4.2

Filed under
KDE

jtechinda.blogspot: Now that KDE 4.2 beta1 packages are finally done we can start using KDE 4.2! I think the changes are absolutely great. Nothing too radical, but the KDE team packed in a lot of features everywhere and it really adds up!

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More in Tux Machines

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more