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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora Looks To Make /usr World-Readable Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:09pm
Story Ubuntu For Cars? It's A Possibility Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:04pm
Story Top 10 Linux desktops part 2 Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 10:00pm
Story How the new lock screen works on Android 5.0 Lollipop Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:47pm
Story CyanogenMod 11 M12 Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:43pm
Story Jolla Begins Teasing Possible New Device, Announcement Next Week Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:35pm
Story First Firefox OS Smartphones Available in the Philippines Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:30pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 RC "Rebecca" to Land in a Couple of Days Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:27pm
Story The Switch To Systemd Will Likely Occur For Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:25pm
Story FreeBSD 10.1 Release Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 9:15pm

Wubi Tuesday

Filed under
Ubuntu

itpro.co.uk/blogs: I have a sneaking feeling that after having done all that back in the days of the 0.8 kernel and with more than a handful of Gentoo installs, I really should I be feeling a little guilty as to just how easy it was to get a dual-boot Linux install working on my main desktop PC.

Few tips for selecting the best Linux apps

Filed under
Software

cyberciti.biz: GNU/Linux and open source software offers lots of choices to end users. This can create a problem for new users. Most Linux distributions provide a program for browsing a list of thousands of free software applications that have already been tested.

Umit, the graphical network scanner

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: Umit is a user-friendly graphical interface to Nmap that lets you perform network port scanning. The utility's most useful features are its stored scan profiles and the ability to search and compare saved network scans.

Get some attitude for aptitude

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Many times when looking around the internet for the rare program that is not in the repository. Or even if you want a newer version of a program that is in the repository. You will find that some sites have pre-prepared binary packages which can be downloaded and installed.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux, Part III: Stellarium and Celestia

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Parts I and II of this series covered covered the "planetarium" programs KStars and XEphem. They can answer pretty much any question about what's where and when in the night sky. But they don't really give you the feeling of being there like a couple of newer entries on the Linux astronomy scene: Stellarium and Celestia.

CME Group joins Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux

finextra.com: Derivatives exchange operator CME Group has joined the Linux Foundation, with its associate director Vinod Kutty taking on the chair of the organisation's end user council.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC: Xandros Vs Eee-ubuntu

  • Gentoo: Improve boot time…
  • Microsoft, Mozilla, Google Talk Browser Futures
  • IBM Lotus Symphony: The Ubuntu Beta
  • The command line is nothing to be afraid of
  • 13 Terminal Emulators for Linux
  • VirtualBox update brings improved performance and 64-bit support
  • Linux Foundation courts individual members
  • Year One with the Linux Based NAS Server
  • KDE 4 drawing performance on nvidia
  • Linux Plumbers Conf: Linus - Git Tutorial
  • Just switched to the Paludis package manager
  • linux-0.01 on Ubuntu
  • OpenSUSE 11 First Impressions
  • Fraught laptop project takes aim at digital divide and poverty
  • ReiserFS File System Corruption and Linux Recovery
  • Linux Outlaws 56 - Have You Had Your Eyes Tested Lately?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reset Your Forgotten Ubuntu Password in 2 Minutes or Less

  • Installing Real Player and Configuring Mozilla Plugin
  • Virtualization As An Alternative To Dual Booting Part 2
  • Basic APT commands
  • Install VirtualBox 2 Guest Additions in Ubuntu
  • Charting your boot processes with bootchart
  • How To: Increase Battery Life in Ubuntu or Debian Linux
  • Running CrossOver Chromium aka "Google Chrome" under Ubuntu
  • Changing what time a process thinks it is with libfaketime

OS stuff (opensuse, ubuntu, windows)

Filed under
OS
  • openSUSE Build Service built openSUSE 11.1 beta 1

  • openSUSE 11.1 beta 1 e1000e driver issue
  • Short Blog on openSUSE
  • What’s Red Hat Doing in the Virtualization Business?
  • Oops! Ubuntu IS gearing up for more kernel contribution

  • Ubuntu loses its virginity, turns commercial
  • Widening Canonical's Commercial Software Pipeline
  • Ubuntu Ibex Alpha 6 Review
  • More Windows 7 M3 Screenshots Leaked

  • Microsoft refers to its anti-Linux playbook to attack VMware
  • Windows 7 versus Generic Linux Distro

Open Source Headlines

  • Open Source makes historic UK breakthrough

  • Open source company wins Becta accreditation (PR)
  • Stanford and Harvard teach businesses how to squash open source
  • Is "open source" a matter of license or employment?
  • Open-source founders doubling up on startups
  • Consolidation and open source: Not likely anytime soon
  • Open source and the box era
  • How big the Google open source credibility gap
  • Google throws down open source gauntlet
  • Two Views of Enterprise Open Source
  • Let's talk cheap software
  • Attorney Shaalu Mehra discusses emerging GPL trends (video)

"what about Canonical's work on the desktop?"

Filed under
Linux

kroah.com: One main question that I saw a lot, and was even asked about during my talk, was "what about Canonical's work on the desktop/Gnome/KDE"? I really don't know if they have contributed a lot of effort back upstream on these projects, that wasn't my point here.

How2 ... join the Linux movement

Filed under
Linux

stuff.co.nz: The Linux movement has taken off and Dave Thompson goes undercover to find out how to join. Every week we get someone asking about Linux what is it, why is it and should I do it? The answer is complicated.

Ohio LinuxFest 2008 Preview

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: The Greater Columbus Convention Center will host this year's annual Ohio LinuxFest, which will take place on October 10-11. Now at its sixth edition, the Ohio LinuxFest will include a large expo and popular speakers, while welcoming free software developers, open source enthusiasts and virtually anyone who is interested.

One Desktop Per Ten A Workable Model

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: The Digital Divide -- there isn't a nation where it doesn't exist, yet it seems so relative. In one place, a child going online via dial up using a PII seems at a disadvantage. Elsewhere, that child has a tool that could change his life. Open source has much to offer here.

How Linux lost the battle for your desktop

Filed under
Linux

techradar.com: A few years ago, it looked like Linux might – just might – take over the world. Companies like Lindows/Linspire were going to make it easy enough for your mother to use. Bright coloured boxes of SUSE and Red Hat and plenty of others were piled high in every computer store. It was going to be a whole new era. Except it didn't really happen, did it?

What’s GNU, Part Four: find

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: A few months ago, we finished the third of a series about features added to longstanding utility programs. This month we’ll look at the new features that GNU programmers and others have added to all of the other features that find(1) already had.

Consider these Linux file management alternatives

Filed under
Software

blogs.techrepublic.com: Many Linux users make use of the KDE or GNOME desktop environments and when it comes to file management, they don’t venture beyond using the environment-provided file management tools like Konqueror or Nautilus. Considering this is Linux, there are many other file management tools to choose from, some of which you may find preferable to the “defaults.”

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex Alpha 6 - Good News for Laptop Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: I installed Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) Alpha 6 on both of my laptops over the weekend, and it looks very good. In the original announcement of the Intrepid Ibex development, Ubuntu spoke of giving priority to "pervasive internet access", and it appears to me that they have made good progress on that.

Review: Linux Mint 5 - KDE Edition

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Ever since I first ran into Linux Mint over a year ago, I've been enamored by it's elegant simplicity, rock solid stability, good hardware support, and excellent user experience. This distribution has continued to impress me time and again, and has really become my number one recommended distro, actually displacing PcLinuxOS in the top slot, for favorite new user friendly distributions.

A Linux Zealot Examines Microsoft Vista

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.techrepublic.com: I know, I know…you’re wondering why this is in the open source blog. The reason is simple: I have used open source operating systems for a long, long time now. I have championed against Microsoft for over ten years. But when Techrepublic liked the idea of me writing some Vista content for them, I couldn’t say no.

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers