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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Linux 'Natty Narwhal' debuts in PHL srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 3:56am
Story FOSS misfits: Rusty Russell's take srlinuxx 06/07/2011 - 3:52am
Story There Should Be Only One Distribution! srlinuxx 2 06/07/2011 - 3:25am
Story The ordeal srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:54am
Story Introducing Update Packs in Linux Mint Debian srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:52am
Story AMD's New Open-Source Employees srlinuxx 1 06/07/2011 - 2:50am
Story Tech Pundits Surrender: The Retreat from Free Software and Open Standards srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 10:40pm
Story People of openSUSE: Manu Gupta srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 7:44pm
Story The Open-Source Car srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 7:43pm
Story 20 Linux Alternatives for Common Windows Applications srlinuxx 05/07/2011 - 5:57pm

The succession problem and open source

Filed under
OSS

The history of computing is the history of entrepreneurs. Open source does not have any big time entrepreneurs. Its visionaries, like Linus Torvalds, Bruce Perens and Richard Stallman, sit outside the corporate culture. Open source is not designed to create kingdoms, but democracies.

“2007: the year of open source”

Filed under
OSS

David Plain, Practice Manager for Novell in Scotland, believes that 2007 will be the year open source software proves its commercial viability in the wider marketplace.

Declaring Open Source

Filed under
OSS

The U.S. Code is the operating system of our system of government, the line-by-line instructions that govern our federal government. The code contains provisions for pretty much everything you can think of and lots of stuff that causes wonderment about its inclusion. But, if you search the U.S. Code for the phrase “open source” you’re not going to find anything.

Collaborative work with OpenOffice: PengYou

Filed under
Software

Quite some time ago I was searching for the possibility to have a server side storage for documents, and to work on them together with others. Sure, in principal you can realize that with KOffice and kparts where you access and store all data over ssh on a server. But first of all that is not supported by OpenOffice, and it would be cool to have this also with some kind of web interface to check the versions of the documents, etc. So I continued my search - and found PengYou.

Seeing the Dawn of Vista by the Light of Open Source

Filed under
Linux

In this article, Mark Rais shares how the new release of MS Vista even more effectively conveys the benefits of OSS.

Get your geek and groove on

Filed under
Linux

Artistic geeks often find creative ways to combine technology and art. A love for good software and beautiful guitars is what inspired Canadian luthier Mark Kett to begin the Linux Guitar Project. Kett had an idea for a travel guitar and through some brainstorming came up with the idea for an "open source" electric guitar -- designed from the ground up by community consensus and fitted with Linux technology.

Jono Bacon: Make videos, win stuff

Filed under
OSS

Technalign and Canonical have hooked together for a competition for all you orange sunglasses wearing, kilted, Lost-loving video makers, and the rest of us who fancy a go at making videos. Send in a decent video and you could bag a prize.

Synaptic Package Manager Tutorial For Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. We will see how to add repositories, install, remove, and update software packages.

Nokia's New N800 Internet Tablet

Filed under
Hardware

The N800 offers one major advantage over many rivals. Because it can use a Wi-Fi connection, the tablet allows for easy Web use and Web calling from public hotspots. And the viewing experience is better than that of most of today's Internet-capable smartphones.

How To Set Up An IRC Server And Anope IRC Services

Filed under
Linux
SUSE
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to set up and run an UnrealIRCD server on OpenSuSE 10.2 and Fedora Core 6. It also shows how to install Anope IRC services. Anope is a set of Services for IRC networks that allows users to manage their nicks and channels in a secure and efficient way, and administrators to manage their network with powerful tools.

AmaroK - A versatile music player for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

I was always of the impression that the function of a music player was little more than playing music. That impression took a beating when I tried a versatile music player called AmaroK.

Your recipes needed for the Official Ubuntu Book!

Filed under
Ubuntu

With the huge success of the Official Ubuntu Book, work is afoot to create a revised edition for Feisty, and we again need your help! If you are interested in contributing, write it up and send it to Corey. Those recipes selected for inclusion in the book will get a free signed copy of the book.

Combining Linux Kernel with Windows?

Filed under
OS

In a quote from Forbes, McVoy had mentioned that he would be "thrilled" to see Microsoft blend the Linux kernel with their existing tools and libraries. No, this isn’t a joke. McVoy, CEO of BitMover, actually said this.

Also: Windows Software Installation by Novell

Foil Wireless Poachers and Have Fun Doing It (Part 2)

Filed under
HowTos

Last week we learned some fun ways to mess with the minds of wireless freeloaders, and introduced ourselves to some methods for finding out who is on our networks. Today we're going to learn some different ways to kick unwanted visitors off networks, and how to see exactly who is lurking on our airwaves.

Free Operating System For Blind: Adriane Knoppix

Filed under
Linux

Klaus and Andriane Knopper are working on an operating system for the blind, and as compared to other solutions available, this one is absolutely free!

A More Productive Kerry Beagle

Filed under
Software

Last year I wrote about some options for desktop search on Linux. Since then many of the projects have advanced and newer ones like Tracker and Strigi show signs of widespread adoption over the next year. Not to be overshadowed, Kerry Beagle came out with a 0.2.1 release that addresses many of the previous version's deficiencies.

Mitchell Baker and the Firefox Paradox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Its products are free. Its work force is largely volunteer. Its meetings are open to anyone. It's a nonprofit. It may be the hottest tech company in America.

Fedora hardware profiler: meet “smolt”

Filed under
Software

A posting at fedoranews.org revealed the availability of smolt - a tool to gather information about the hardware of the Fedora users. The basic idea is that you submit your hardware profile together with a unique ID to a central server after installation.

War and free software

Filed under
OSS

As most of us know, free software provides an abundant set of efficient and productive tools. Many are aware of the reported peaceful uses of free software in government. Linux has long been used in NASA, to create beowulf clusters, and now to develop land robot explorers. Unbeknownst to many, however, is the increasing use of free software by the militaries of the world.

Understanding Ajax book review

Filed under
Reviews

The competition among Ajax programming books has gotten all the more fierce with Prentice Hall's excellent Understanding Ajax. While many Ajax texts are good at covering a handful of advanced Ajax-related topics, this one starts at the beginning and covers every necessary aspect of Ajax programming in just the right amount of detail.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box