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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tiny Core Linux srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 6:07pm
Story ArchLinux vs Slackware srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 6:06pm
Story Top 10 Reasons Why Red Hat is Moving to Downtown Raleigh srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 6:05pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 7:04am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 6:52am
Story Dream Studio 11.04- A based Ubuntu Multimedia OS srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 3:25am
Story Mandriva 2011 seen from a non-technical user's perspective srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 3:24am
Story Desktop: “The report of my death was an exaggeration” srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 3:20am
Story Linux Kernel Host Kernel.org Breached srlinuxx 01/09/2011 - 1:57am
Story Sabayon 6 Roundup - Fluxbox and XBMC srlinuxx 31/08/2011 - 10:52pm

How To Install Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Zimbra is a full-featured, open source collaboration suite - email, group calendaring, contacts, and web document management and authoring. This guide shows how to install the Zimbra Collaboration Suite (ZCS) on Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) and 6.06 (Dapper Drake) server systems.

The Road to KDE 4: Oxygen Artwork and Icons

Filed under
KDE

One of the big visual changes just happened in KDE 4, the transition of kdelibs to the Oxygen Icon set. This transition is still in progress, and it includes a massive icon naming scheme change that affects thousands of files. But, the Oxygen artwork project much is more than just an icon set, it's a unified way to do artwork for KDE 4.

Backup and Restore Ubuntu System using Sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called "sbackup"

Thunar : Versatile and Impressive replacement for Nautilus

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Thunar is a file manager that is shipped by default with XFCE and is a integral part of XFCE desktop environment. It is similar to Nautilus but uses much less resource as compared to Nautilus, and in fact one of the goals of creating Thunar was to create a file manager that was fast, clean and easy to use.

Desktop Search Engine with Doodle

Filed under
Software
HowTos

Doodle is a tool to quickly search the documents on a computer. Doodle builds an index using meta-data contained in the documents and allows fast searches on the resulting database. Doodle uses libextractor to support obtaining meta-data from various file-formats. The database used by doodle is a suffix tree, resulting in fast lookups.

Review: SimplyMEPIS 6.5 RC1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Release Candidate 1 of SimplyMEPIS 6.5 has just been released and since I was planning on reviewing beta 7, I figured I might as well download RC1 before doing my official review. I am using the 64-bit version on my desktop.

Melbourne uni drops Unix for Linux

Filed under
Linux

The University of Melbourne's University Systems Project is set to undergo its largest transformation since its launch four years ago with the core Unix systems to be replaced by Linux by the end of the year.

Oracle shows no momentum in Linux effort

Filed under
Linux

Oracle Corp. promised to take the Linux software world by storm last October, but the major expansion by one of the world's largest software companies so far has failed to show momentum.

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Is Ubuntu slowly dying?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Linux was started in 2004 by Mark Shuttleworth: an entrepreneur that made his fortunes by selling his company Thawte to VeriSign. According to distrowatch.com, Ubuntu has held the number 1 spot for several years as the most popular Linux distribution. And even at this point in time, with the top Linux distribution, the future is very uncertain.

Evaluating Knoppix 5.1.1 for use in the Linuxworld lab

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

What LiveCD distro is out there that uses KDE as the primary desktop, but is stocked with best of breed apps appropriate to the questions the lab is asking and answering? Knoppix would seem to be the obvious answer.

If you think selling Linux is easy, why not beat Dell to it?

Filed under
Linux

Dell's latest launch has really taken off. Unfortunately for Dell's crumbling profitability, it's a website called IdeaStorm, not a new PC. The problem for Dell is that by far the most popular suggestion is one that Dell will find hard to implement.

Fun with Ubuntu -- Top Ten Next Names, Part 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu enjoys giving it releases funny animal names. There have been "warty warthog", "hoary hedgehog", "breezy badger", "dapper drake", "edgy eft", and the coming "feisty fawn." Well, with nothing better to blog about this week, I've decided to provide my suggestions for names.

Should Linux Play the Apple Card?

Filed under
Linux

Periodically, the suggestion is made. The latest similar argument - though he does not, in fact, take Apple’s name in vain - comes from Jeremiah Foster in the form of an open letter to Mark Shuttleworth, of Canonical/Ubuntu fame (oh yeah, and Soyuz). When I’m asked whether or not I agree with that strategy, I usually hesitate.

FSF Announces Details of its Annual Meeting

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation announced details for its annual associate member and activist meeting to be held at MIT, Cambridge, MA, on Saturday, March 24th, 2007.

On granularity and packages in Pardus

Filed under
Software

Pondering a little on some small issues like kdeutils lacking KEdit (not fixed in 2007.1) or kdeutils not having KRegExpEditor (to be fixed in 2007.1), I wonder what would be the best policy with regards to the granularity, size and contents of the PiSi packages.

(K)Ubuntu to OpenSuSe - My Experience

Filed under
SUSE

I was using Ubuntu in my laptop for a long time and then moved to Kubuntu recently. Both Ubuntu and Kubuntu didn’t recognize my built in web camera. After I read that OpenSuSe recognized the webcam for Daniel Aleksandersen, I thought I would give that a try without an idea of how painful it was going to be.

Nine Reasons Why the Linux Desktop is a Complete Blast!

Filed under
Linux

A Linux system immediately snaps to attention and does your bidding, with no hassle at all. Even when you tell it to do something impossible, it tries to make you happy and only reports back to you upon failure. If you're tired of the computer popping up an "Are you sure?" dialog box in your face, you'll love Linux.

Ubuntu Tidbits

Filed under
HowTos

I created this post to document all of the small things I do on my Ubuntu systems to make them customized for me. My hope is that people who want to do similar things will learn from my experiences.

Also: Ubuntu Customization Guide

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More in Tux Machines

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more

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Case in point: I've been using the Apache HTTP server for many years now. Indeed, you could say that I've been using Apache since before it was even called "Apache"—what started as the original NCSA HTTP server, and then the patched server that some enterprising open-source developers distributed, and finally the Apache Foundation-backed open-source colossus that everyone recognizes, and even relies on, today—doing much more than just producing HTTP servers. Apache's genius was its modularity. You could, with minimal effort, configure Apache to use a custom configuration of modules. If you wanted to have a full-featured server with tons of debugging and diagnostics, you could do that. If you wanted to have high-level languages, such as Perl and Tcl, embedded inside your server for high-speed Web applications, you could do that. If you needed the ability to match, analyze and rewrite every part of an HTTP transaction, you could do that, with mod_rewrite. And of course, there were third-party modules as well. Read more

Linux and Open Source Hardware for IoT

Most of the new 21 open source software projects for IoT that we examined last week listed Linux hacker boards as their prime development platforms. This week, we’ll look at open source and developer-friendly Linux hardware for building Internet of Things devices, from simple microcontroller-based technology to Linux-based boards. In recent years, it’s become hard to find an embedded board that isn’t marketing with the IoT label. Yet, the overused term is best suited for boards with low prices, small footprints, low power consumption, and support for wireless communications and industrial interfaces. Camera support is useful for some IoT applications, but high-end multimedia is usually counterproductive to attributes like low cost and power consumption. Read more

Fedora 24 -- The Best Distro for DevOps?

If you have been to any DevOps-focused conferences -- whether it’s OpenStack Summit or DockerCon -- you will see a sea of MacBooks. Thanks to its UNIX base, availability of Terminal app and Homebrew, Apple hardware is extremely popular among DevOps professionals. What about Linux? Can it be used as a platform by developers, operations, and DevOps pros? Absolutely, says Major Hayden, Principal Architect at Rackspace, who used to be a Mac OS user and has switched to Fedora. Hayden used Mac OS for everything: software development and operations. Mac OS has all the bells and whistles that you need on a consumer operating system; it also allows software professionals to get the job done. But developers are not the target audience of Mac OS. They have to make compromises. “It seemed like I had to have one app that would do one little thing and this other app would do another little thing,” said Hayden. Read more