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Sunday, 29 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux and tomato sauce: The cost of choice

Filed under
Linux

When a user decides to try Linux, they're overwhelmed with choices before, during, and after the installation. People don't want infinite choices. They sometimes want the ability to choose, but they rarely want to be forced to choose.

The Future of Hardware Compatibility Lists in Linux

Filed under
Linux

A while back, I made a comment with regard to how great it would be to have a single, collective HCL (hardware compatibility list) for all of the popular Linux distributions. At the time, I felt very strongly that if we had a one single collective database of hardware that was known to work with the latest distributions, life would be a lot easier.

Kingston HyperX 2GB PC2-8000

Filed under
Hardware

You want fast memory? Kingston has fast memory! Though not usually touted as the company to offer killer gaming memory, the HyperX PC2-8000 kit proves to be one of the fastest kits we've tested!

Book Review: How to do everything with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Reviews

If you're planning to take a stab at being an open source programmer then there are harder ways to do it than to start with PHP, MySQl and Apache. This book, How to do everything with PHP & MySQL pulls together both skills into one book which, frankly, makes sense.

Linux v. Microsoft: Third World Showdown

Filed under
OS

Those of you who have followed Silicon Hutong for a while will know that I have long been a Linux-skeptic, believing firmly that despite its obvious advantages on servers, Linux would never be in a position to displace Windows on the desktop.

Well, I was wrong.

Enable password aging on Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Password aging is a mechanism that allows the system to enforce a certain lifetime for passwords. While this may be moderately inconvenient for users, it ensures that passwords are changed occasionally, which is a good security practice. Most Linux distributions do not enable password aging by default, but it's very easy to enable.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand. There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest new features for laptop users in Ubuntu is network-manager. With this shiny new application it is finally easy to connect your Ubuntu system to any wireless network. Where previously you had to jump through hoops to do WPA or 802.1x authentication, network manager makes this completely transparent.

GNU/Linux vs. Mac: Why Apple will not dominate?

Filed under
OS

At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. It is a known fact that Windows still holds the vast majority of the market and Mac OS X is tied to computers made only by one manufacturer.

Desktop memory usage

Filed under
Software

This was actually supposed to be a follow-up to my tests of startup performance of various desktop environments, primarily KDE of course. I decided I should publish at least a shorter variant with all the numbers and some conclusions. You can do your own analyses of the numbers if you will.

How to set up a VoIP service with Xorcom Rapid, Asterisk PBX and *starShop-OSS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this howto I will show you step-by-step how to successfully set up a long distance calls service in your Cybercafé, using open source software. The main element is *starShop-OSS, an open source application designed to monitor and bill, in real time, calls made via Asterisk PBX. This service is commonly called callshop or taxiphone.

XenEnterprise 3.0 Works Well Within Limits

Filed under
Reviews

XenSource offers its first product, which is the best Xen virtualization solution eWEEK Labs has tested, although it's not yet ready to take on VMware.

The ever growing Monster

Filed under
Just talk

A simple oversight may cause some wondering WTF? I’ve been spending most of my time getting my Debian installation up and running with what I need. After a week or so I am really happy with it. Then the other day, I was trying to install something and I had run out of disk space! 23 gigs used already? for Linux?

What you should (and shouldn't) expect from 64-bit Linux

Filed under
Linux

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can't help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands -- but they're not really Linux's fault, either.

Open source stacks move into critical operations

Filed under
Interviews

The open source stack is moving to the core of data centers -- to a place where it's responsible for handling critical parts of business operations. Support for these applications is paramount for IT departments and absolutely essential to the enterprises that use them, according to a report from The 451 Group, based in New York.

Something Out of Nothing - Ubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) on a Packard Bell iMedia 1307

Filed under
Ubuntu

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a set of desktop computers in a more wretched state than those I saw this morning. It was going to be something of a miracle if they started up; however they did. Still, the result was not particularly pleasing. I decided to install and see if Linux could bring something as wretched as this back to life.

Which way, open-sourcers?

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this year, I wrote that the General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) would bring the open-source and free-software communities to a critical juncture. While some scoffed, the decision of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) to discount the concerns of commercial open-sourcers with the latest draft of GPLv3 threatens to split the community and slow the growth of free/libre/open-source software (FLOSS).

Educational Institutions Adopt Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat announced the growing adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Network solutions by several higher education institutions, including Wake Forest University, the University of Washington and Vanderbilt University.

Secure your Wi-Fi traffic using FOSS utilities

Filed under
HowTos

A recent Slashdot item on Wi-Fi security was a timely reminder of the weaknesses of default Wi-Fi encryption protocols, and the dangers of using unencrypted, public Wi-Fi connections. Fortunately, you can use FOSS utilities to securely tunnel your Wi-Fi connection sessions and protect your Web and email traffic.

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today's leftovers

  • What is Linux?
  • The Rumors Aren’t True
    I was listening to my usual round of amazing Linux Podcasts this week (you know who you are) and one of the discussions that made the rounds was about hardware compatibility issues with Linux. One of the hosts was bemoaning the issues with running linux on a repurposed MacBook and trying to get the wireless drivers to work. That led to a discussion about proprietary vs. non-proprietary drivers and you can pretty much guess how the conversation went from there.
  • Download Linux Voice issue 19
    Issue 19 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.
  • LabXNow – Code, Develop, and Test Software From Anywhere on the Cloud
    LabXNow is a cloud service provider that offers a free and personal online environment to different users with direct access from a web browser. You can think of it as your personal remote lab, where you can play around, code, develop or whatever you want. You can access it from anywhere with an Internet connection.
  • BoilingSteam has a nice podcast episode with the creator of SteamOS tools
  • Please, Don’t Touch Anything now supports Linux, don't you dare touch that button
    You all just want to buy it so you can press the button don't you? I know I do. Please, Don’t Touch Anything is now officially available on Linux with a nice discount.
  • Meet KDE Neon, A New Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu Linux
    KDE Neon is the latest and probably the best technology the KDE Community has developed, and I stand to be corrected if it is not so. You can call it a new Linux distro but KDE Neon is basically built comprehensively on Ubuntu Linux as the core, to bring the latest and hottest software developed by the KDE Community in a rolling release format to KDE desktop environment users. The KDE Neon project is intended to provide users cutting-edge features on a highly configurable and yet stable desktop in a single package. The packages made in KDE Neon are based on Ubuntu and are not compatible with other Linux distros such as Arch Linux and OpenSUSE as stated by Jonathan Riddell, one of the project heads and who was previously in charge of the Kubuntu Linux project.
  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!
    Many people liked the Interface of Windows 10 because now it carries all those features which Linux already have from years. Do you like the look of Windows 10 but don't want to use it? Here we brought Windows 10 GTK themes for you, this theme offers two versions Light and Dark, you can use whatever you like. But hold on, now many people will say like 'why you are so obsessed by other operating systems and so, Linux is great OS', yeah I do agree that many geeks consider Linux above all operating systems. The superiority of the Linux shows that you can do whatever you like to do with your OS, change look/design and so, that's called freedom. We should appreciate new comers to Linux instead of letting them down, and people leave Linux because they think it is quite difficult to survive with this OS.
  • Manjaro Update 2016-05-22 (stable)
    We are happy to announce our first update for Manjaro 16.06-rc1 (Daniella)!
  • Hackfest 1.2 (Day 2)
    Welcome to Day 2 of the Solus Hackfest 1.2!
  • This Week in Solus – Install #29
  • Unixstickers Gives Back to FOSS Projects
  • Chalet OS 16.04LTS
  • ChaletOS 16.04 - See What's New
  • New Gentoo LiveDVD "Choice Edition"
  • Chromium 51 packages available
  • Debian: Outreachy, Debian Reproducible builds Week 1 Progress Report
  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian unstable
    Puppet 4 has been uploaded to Debian unstable. This is a major upgrade from Puppet 3. If you are using Puppet, chances are that it is handling important bits of your infrastructure, and you should upgrade with care. Here are some points to consider.
  • Pocket CHIP $49 Indie Game Console
    Last year, we were impressed by Next Thing Co's $9 CHIP computer. At Maker Faire 2016, we were able to check out their PocketCHIP housing, which puts CHIP into a portable console package that runs Linux and indie game console Pico-8. Here's what you can do with the $49 system!
  • Finnish Govt Disappointed with Microsoft’s Job Cuts, Says They Impact Economy
    Microsoft has recently announced a new round of job layoffs at its Mobile unit in Finland, as it moves forward with its restructuring and reorganization plan following the acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services unit.
  • The Nokia Saga Predictions on This Blog: Full Listing with Links[Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]
    So lets understand the context of when Elop came in. Nokia in 2009 sold 67.8 million smartphones globally (with 39% market share). This was a world record obivously and Nokia set record profits in its smartphone unit. In 2010 Nokia then grew 35.8 million new smartphone sales (growth rate of 53% !!!!). Nokia from 2009 to 2010 grew MORE than Apple even thought Apple released its most popular new iPhone model ever, the iPhone 4. Apple grew 22.4 million units but Nokia grew more, Nokia grew 35.8 million new smartphones. Very literally mathematically irrevocably true - Nokia was WINNING against Apple iPhone in 2010. Nokia GREW MORE than Apple with its MOST iconic new smartphone. The GAP between Nokia and Apple was NOT CLOSING, it was GROWING. Nokia was PULLING AWAY from Apple in 2010. Look at the numbers side-by-side...

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Derivatives

Android Leftovers