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Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Myths of Linux - People don't care about licensing

Filed under
OSS

gnuru.org: I care about the licensing of the software I use, not because of some philosophical principle, but because I got sick and tired of having the thumbscrews put on me by proprietary software companies.

Cortex-A8 gaming handheld runs Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: OpenPandora.org will start taking orders this month for its developer-friendly Linux-based handheld gaming device. Set to ship in November, the $330 device runs Angstrom Linux on an ARM Cortex-A8 processor with OpenGL 2.0 graphics and a 4.3-inch, 800x480 touchscreen.

5 Great iTunes Replacements for Managing iPod in Linux

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: We all love the iPod, but sadly, Apple is still not kind enough to provide an iPod manager for those of us who use Linux. However, this is not really a big issue nowadays as there are other means to manage your iPod under Linux. Thanks to these excellent free and open source media players that are certified to handle your iPod the way iTunes can.

Tracking Linux CPU Performance Statistics

computingtech.blogspot: Each system-wide Linux performance tool provides different ways to extract similar statistics. Although no tool displays all the statistics, some of the tools display the same statistics.

Fedora 10's Plymouth Might Prevent Boot

Filed under
Linux

marilyn.frields.org: There’s a new feature coming in Fedora 10 that is going to be very apparent to users trying the F10 Beta as their first introduction to the release. Plymouth uses X modesetting to drop the aging rhgb graphical boot engine in favor of a sleeker, faster system. However, the feature doesn’t work seamlessly for every video chipset.

The First Three Netbooks To Consider

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Wading through the numerous netbooks available today can be challenging, so you might want to at least start with this list of the first three netbooks to consider.

Review: KLibido Newsreader 0.2.5

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: One of the things I've been forever in search of on Linux is a good newsreader, especially for binaries, since I frequently find that the various files I'm after (patches and distro ISO files mostly) are available only on Usenet.

Linux Promotion in Mall Kiosks

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb: I have been attending Linux install festivals for years. Always fun, often educational and (in some cases) completely missing the mark of their potential for the people they interact with. There is so much more these same knowledgeable individuals could be doing with the general public.

Firefox 3.0.2 coming next week minus EULA

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.internetnews.com: Firefox 3.0.2 and 2.0.0.17 releases have been pushed back by a week according to Mozilla's Mike Beltzner, with the EULA issue being one of three additional bugs that have been fixed.

Hard core Linux developers discuss the future of Linux at the Kernel Summit

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Linus Torvalds, Andrew Morton and eighty other important kernel developers are now debating how they plan to proceed with the future development of Linux at the Kernel Summit 2008 in Portland, Oregon.

Compiz 0.7.8 Arrives With New Plug-In

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Back in May we had the release of Compiz 0.7.6 with rewritten plug-ins and other changes to boost the vitality of this popular compositing manager. Since then all activity on the Compiz front has been relatively quiet, until this morning. Danny Baumann has announced the release of Compiz 0.7.8.

My display

A comparative look at compact sysadmin distributions

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Things go wrong. Hard disks fail and whole servers crash. Luckily, many Linux-based distributions are available to help systems administrators handle minor catastrophes. We looked at four of the most portable, all of which fit on a 210MB mini CD -- SliTaz, Parted Magic, GParted, and RIPLinuX.

Shuttleworth man heads to Mozilla

Filed under
Moz/FF

tectonic.co.za: The Shuttleworth Foundation’s open philanthropy fellow, Mark Surman, will be moving to the Mozilla Foundation where he has been appointed executive director and will continue his work in open sourcing philanthropy.

GIMP 2.5.4 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

GIMP approaches the next stable release and only a handful bugs are left to be fixed before GIMP 2.6 is ready.

5 best-practices of a successful Linux user

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There would have been one or more reasons which would have tempted each one of us to try Linux, and some of us just never looked back. Few would have probably turned out to be Linux professionals, while others would still be struggling with what’s good and what’s perfect.

I want to break free!

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Freeme2 is a program for stripping the DRM from commonly distributed music and sound files. More specifically it strips it from windows sound files of the format wmv, wma and asf. It also can do the same from video and audio streams.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Can Ubuntu Overcome The Status Quo?

  • Microsoft hails open source outreach
  • Found: The World’s Hottest Ubuntu Linux Deployment
  • Review: Star Wars: The Force Unleashed
  • OLPC rivals get 'vicious'
  • The Road to Geekdom
  • How to uninstall application in ubuntu cleanly
  • Grep: RRTFM
  • Tux3 Report: What next?
  • BECTA Back in Play
  • Shuttleworth urges calm in Firefox/Ubuntu flap
  • Change Boot-up options in Ubuntu

Firefox without EULAs — Update

Filed under
Software

Mitchell Baker: We’re still working on this. There’s been a bunch of helpful feedback. We appreciate this. We think we’ve integrated the feedback into something that’s a good solution; different from out last version in both its essence and its presentation and content.

Look Ma, No Terminal

Filed under
Software

linuxhaxor.net: A common misconception with Linux is that you have to know how to use the terminal in order for you to use linux. The fact is you won’t have to use the linux terminal more than you would use CMD in Windows or the terminal in Mac OSX.

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Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

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Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.