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Friday, 20 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Developers Close GTK+ Bug in Ubuntu That Allowed Users to Bypass the Lock Screen Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:46pm
Story Linux Mint 18 Could Adopt Systemd Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:43pm
Story The TrackingPoint 338TP, the Linux Rifle that's accurate up to a mile Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:36pm
Story NVIDIA Releases Massive Stable Driver, Brings Support for Latest Kernels and X.org Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:31pm
Story Manjaro XFCE 0.9.0-pre1 edition released Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:23pm
Story Linux 3.19-rc5 Rianne Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 11:11pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 9:04pm
Story Handheld Linux Terminal Gets an A+ Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:33pm
Story Asynchronous Device/Driver Probing For The Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:31pm
Story First ownCloud lustrum Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2015 - 8:24pm

Linux on the iPhone! Why Should You Care?

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: Time and time again I expressed my disdain for Apple and their anti-competitive tactics by locking down the iPhone and iPod. So its no wonder that the news the Linux kernel has been successfully ported to the iPhone came as a breath of fresh air.

Why Ubuntu and Too Much Trust Can Be Bad

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: One of desktop Linux’s chief selling points is its near-immunity to malware. Whether this superiority is due to the Unix security measures that Windows lacks, or to the mere fact that comparatively few people use Linux on desktop computers, it makes Linux attractive in an era when all manner of nasty things can be done to computer users by exploiting bugs in the software they run.

KDE 4 Video Editor Kdenlive Released

Filed under
Software

dot.kde.org: The promising nonlinear video editor Kdenlive has made its first non beta for KDE 4, version 0.7 is on us. This closes another gap of the free desktop world: a usable open source video editor.

Microsoft Makes $20 billion dollar bid for Linux based Yahoo

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

tribbleagency.com: The UK Times is reporting that Microsoft and Yahoo! are in a $20 billion dollar deal (less than half their bid in February of $44.6 Billion) , the question not asked is what is Microsoft going to do with all those Linux servers?

How a Mandriva Upgrade led to me installing OpenSUSE

Filed under
MDV
SUSE

blogbeebe.blogspot: I've been waiting to upgrade europa, who's been running Mandriva 2008.1 Power Pack. I've been quite happy with it. Of course, the only reason to upgrade is because Mandriva 2009.0 Power Pack is the new hotness, which makes 2008.1 old and busted.

State of hardware support in Linux

Filed under
Linux

lucas-nussbaum.net: I’m getting increasingly annoyed by the state of some aspects of hardware support in Linux.

Even More Madcap Manpages

Filed under
Humor

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: While out trudging through the wasteland of that thingy they call the Internet, looking far and wide for stuff to make me chuckle, I ran across this awesome collection of fake, and funny, man pages.

5 Pranks for Your Linux-Using Friend

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Please use your judgment about the person, the computer, and the prank before attempting this. Always try whatever you plan to do on your own computer or some other safe computer before doing anything.

Creating your perfect Linux system

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: If you are looking for step by step instructions to creating your perfect Linux system then stop reading now. How can I know what your perfect system is? What I can do is give some guidelines to enable you to determine what your perfect system is.

Fedora 10 Comes Out With Five More Spins

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Fedora 10 was officially released a few days ago, but the Fedora SIG (Special Interest Group) has this weekend announced the availability of a few application-specific spins for Cambridge. Well, seven different spins to be exact.

#!CrunchBang Linux: Flash! Bang! Wallop! What A Distro!

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: IT'S easy to ignore the tide of Linux distributions based on Ubuntu - there are just so many of them and you wonder what yet another could possibly be offering that is not already offered elsewhere.

Fedora 10 Review

Filed under
Linux

montanalinux.org: Fedora 10 was officially released on Tuesday November 25, 2008. Since its release I have installed it on a number of machines and been running it as my full-time desktop.

Why do Windows programs suck so freaking much? (and what can they learn from Linux)

itwire.com: Open Task Manager on any Windows computer and chances are there are a hundred processes even if you're just sitting idly on the desktop. What's with the obsession to constantly make crap run on startup? Let's look at some common offenders and how to cut them down to size.

full circle magazine issue 19 ready

Filed under
Ubuntu

We’re almost to #20! Also, this month, we’re starting a new feature - Ubuntu Games. This month: Command and Conquer - Lost and Found, how-To : Program in C - Part 3, Make a WiFi Access Point, and Using GIMP - Part 8 and Create Mobile Multimedia.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 48

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #48 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Development Release: openSUSE 11.1 RC 1 Now Available, Joe Brockmeier: YaST Mascot Winner Chosen! Say Hello to Yastie, and Ben Martin: Debug your shell scripts with bashdb.

odds & ends & stuff

Filed under
News
  • FLOSS Weekly 48: OpenSUSE

  • Gentoo on an Clamshell iBook
  • Linux Action Show: Fedora 10 Review
  • The Best Gift This Christmas! Linux!
  • Data encryption and Ubuntu, Part III
  • The Fedora Girlfriend Test - More Linux and Unix Humor
  • Katowice saving public money with OpenOffice.org
  • On File Systems
  • MythTV Adds Support For NVIDIA VDPAU
  • Installing GNOME Shell in Ubuntu
  • Scottish Open Source Awards 2008
  • FOSS: Price Is Zero, Value Is Priceless
  • How to increase number of disk mounts before next fsck at system boot
  • Future Linux Geek
  • MP3 collection, a personal jukebox, an MP3 streamer - Zina
  • How To Create A Custom Splashimage For GRUB
  • Customize the command line terminal in Linux - Guide

XP vs. Ubuntu - Asthetics

Filed under
OS

moral-flexibility.net/blog: My old version of XP was long overdue to be reinstalled. At almost 4 years old it was cludging like mad, and desperately needed cleanup. I’d been considering switching to Ubuntu ever since I’d installed it on the surveillance system DVR, but was concerned.

Why is Linux THE FASTEST operating system today?

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: No doubt about it. Linux is the fastest operating system in use today. And you can have it all for free. Ever since its humble beginnings, written by a guy crazed with the bite of a charging penguin, Linux has improved by leaps and bounds. So why is Linux the fastest operating system?

New features in MySQL 5.1

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: Since the big leap forward to MySQL 5.0, it's taken the MySQL development team three years, during which there have been a whole string of pre-release versions, to release the new version 5.1 of the popular database. MySQL 5.1.30 (General Availability) is available to download from various mirrors.

Also: Monty says beware of MySQL 5.1 GA

Cool Command Line Apps for GNU/Linux and other Unix Systems

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: Even though I am a strong advocate of learning as much as you can about using the command line, I admit I like my GUI a lot (and Compiz of course Smile ). The CLI can be really useful for repairing your system or just doing some task that takes far more clicks in the graphical interface.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing Apple and Microsoft Proprietary Frameworks/Services

Viperr Linux Keeps Crunchbang Alive with a Fedora Flair

Do you remember Crunchbang Linux? Crunchbang (often referred to as #!) was a fan-favorite, Debian-based distribution that focused on using a bare minimum of resources. This was accomplished by discarding the standard desktop environment and using a modified version of the Openbox Window Manager. For some, Crunchbang was a lightweight Linux dream come true. It was lightning fast, easy to use, and hearkened back to the Linux of old. Read more

Openwashing Cars

  • Open source: sharing patents to speed up innovation
    Adjusting to climate change will require a lot of good ideas. The need to develop more sustainable forms of industry in the decades ahead demands vision and ingenuity. Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla and SpaceX, believes he has found a way for companies to share their breakthroughs and speed up innovation. Fond of a bold gesture, the carmaker and space privateer announced back in 2014 that Tesla would make its patents on electric vehicle technology freely available, dropping the threat of lawsuits over its intellectual property (IP). Mr Musk argued the removal of pesky legal barriers would help “accelerate the advent of sustainable transport”. The stunning move has already had an impact. Toyota has followed Tesla by sharing more than 5,600 patents related to hydrogen fuel cell cars, making them available royalty free. Ford has also decided to allow competitors to use its own electric vehicle-related patents, provided they are willing to pay for licences. Could Telsa’s audacious strategy signal a more open approach to patents among leading innovators? And if more major companies should decide to adopt a carefree attitude to IP, what are the risks involved?
  • Autonomous car platform Apollo doesn't want you to reinvent the wheel
    Open source technologies are solving many of our most pressing problems, in part because the open source model of cooperation, collaboration, and almost endless iteration creates an environment where problems are more readily solved. As the adage goes, "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow." However, self-driving vehicle technology is one rapidly growing area that hasn't been greatly influenced by open source. Most of today's autonomous vehicles, including those from Volkswagen, BMW, Volvo, Uber, and Google, ride on proprietary technology, as companies seek to be the first to deliver a successful solution. That changed recently with the launch of Baidu's Apollo.

today's leftovers

  • KDE Applications 18.04 Brings Dolphin Improvements, JuK Wayland Support
    The KDE community has announced the release today of KDE Applications 18.04 as the first major update to the open-source KDE application set for 2018.
  • Plasma Startup
    Startup is one of the rougher aspects of the Plasma experience and therefore something we’ve put some time into fixing [...] The most important part of any speed work is correctly analysing it. systemd-bootchart is nearly perfect for this job, but it’s filled with a lot of system noise.
  • Announcing Virtlyst – a web interface to manage virtual machines
    Virtlyst is a web tool that allows you to manage virtual machines. In essence it’s a clone of webvirtmgr, but using Cutelyst as the backend, the reasoning behind this was that my father in law needs a server for his ASP app on a Win2k server, the server has only 4 GiB of RAM and after a week running webvirtmgr it was eating 300 MiB close to 10% of all available RAM. To get a VNC or SPICE tunnel it spawns websockify which on each new instance around 20 MiB of RAM get’s used. I found this unacceptable, a tool that is only going to be used once in a while, like if the win2k freezes or goes BSOD, CPU usage while higher didn’t play a role on this.
  • OPNFV: driving the network towards open source "Tip to Top"
    Heather provides an update on the current status of OPNFV. How is its work continuing and how is it pursuing the overall mission? Heather says much of its work is really ‘devops’ and it's working on a continuous integration basis with the other open source bodies. That work continues as more bodies join forces with the Linux Foundation. Most recently OPNFV has signed a partnership agreement with the open compute project. Heather says the overall OPNFV objective is to work towards open source ‘Tip to top’ and all built by the community in ‘open source’. “When we started, OPNFV was very VM oriented (virtual machine), but now the open source movement is looking more to cloud native and containerisation as the way forward,” she says. The body has also launched a C-RAN project to ensure that NFV will be ready to underpin 5G networks as they emerge.
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E07 – Seven Years in Tibet - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Failure to automate: 3 ways it costs you
    When I ask IT leaders what they see as the biggest benefit to automation, “savings” is often the first word out of their mouths. They’re under pressure to make their departments run as efficiently as possible and see automation as a way to help them do so. Cost savings are certainly a benefit of automation, but I’d argue that IT leaders who pursue automation for cost-savings alone are missing the bigger picture of how it can help their businesses. The true value of automation doesn’t lie in bringing down expenses, but rather in enabling IT teams to scale their businesses.
  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes
    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition. Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration. "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."