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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 6 Microblogging clients for Linux srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 10:54pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 174 is out! srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 10:52pm
Story Red Hat OpenShift Express & The Leafy Miracle srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 10:52pm
Story Speeding Up The Linux Kernel With Your GPU srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 10:50pm
Story GameTree Linux Is Finally Out There, Sort Of srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 8:15pm
Story Kubuntu 11.04 review srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 6:21pm
Story yesterday's leftovers: srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 5:15pm
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 5:08pm
Story KDE Ships 4.6.3 srlinuxx 2 07/05/2011 - 7:33am
Story SimplyMEPIS 11.0 Released, Looks Good srlinuxx 07/05/2011 - 5:57am

SymphonyOS 2006-12 Released

Filed under
Linux

The Symphony OS Project is pleased to announce the release of Symphony OS 2006-12. This release, the first since May, brings more stability and enhanced features to the young desktop environment and Linux Distro.

OpenOffice gets pre-load, update notification

Filed under
OOo

Programmers released OpenOffice.org 2.1 on Tuesday. The version that a feature for Linux machines called Quickstarter, which preloads the office suite into memory so it launches faster when a user chooses to run it.

In addition, the new version includes an improved notification system that alerts users to new versions of the software.

Why FOSS isn't on activist agendas

Filed under
OSS

In theory, free and open source software (FOSS) should have a direct appeal to those concerned with ethics and social issues. Yet, in practice, it rarely does. Although the FOSS and activist communities frequently share ethical positions and social interests ranging from freedom of expression and cooperative organization to consumer rights, privacy, and anti-trust legislation, mostly the two groups remain unaware of each other. Why?

Mozilla delivers Thunderbird 2.0 beta, preps Firefox update

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla on Tuesday released the first beta of Thunderbird 2.0, the open-source developer's next-generation e-mail client. It also pushed back the rollout of a Firefox security update by nearly a week.

Review of Minix 3.1.2a IDE build2

Filed under
OS
Reviews

Minix is an operating system designed for "resource limited" or embedded computer systems. Versions 1 and 2 were teaching operating systems upon which the famous book, Operating Systems Design and Implementation, by Andrew S Tanenbaum and Albert S Woodhull, is based and also was the inspiration for Linux. With this latest release, version 3, Minix aims to be a complete, stable, secure desktop operating system for everyday use. Does it live up to those claims?

Migrate Visual Studio C and C++ projects to Eclipse CDT

Filed under
News

The Eclipse Platform is an open source tool to assist you with moving a project from the design to the test phase within a single development environment and without the need for separate tools for each stage. This article provides a step-by-step procedure for migrating Microsoft Visual Studio C/C++ (MSVC) projects to Eclipse. Along the way, we compare and contrast the benefits of using MSVC and Eclipse CDT.

On the Bench: Ulteo Sirius Alpha

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The open source movement has it’s share of heroes. Individuals that can motivate groups of individuals and rally them behind a certain part of the development process. People like Gaël Duval, who created the Mandrake (now Mandriva) distribution, one of the most accessible and user-friendly distributions for W2L migrators. Enough has been said about him being fired from the company he helped to found. Today is today and Gaël Duval is putting himself behind a new project, a new distribution, a new way of using open source software.

Open Invention Network's Jerry Rosenthal Answers Your Questions

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Here are Open Invention Network CEO Jerry Rosenthal's answers to Groklaw's collection of questions about OIN and how it operates. OIN describes itself as "an intellectual property company formed to further the Linux environment by acquiring patents and ensuring their availability". Here are some of those patents.

Ankh for Linux in production

Filed under
Gaming

It seems the 200 interested buyers limit was met without problems at ixSoft, as Ankh for Linux is now mentioned both on ixSoft.de and Rune-soft as being in final release candidate.

New virtualization option for Linux: KVM (and Linux virtualization summary)

Filed under
Linux

KVM stands for 'Kernel-based Virtual Machine' it provides a simple way to have full hardware virtualization available for Linux users on machines that supports either the VT (Intel) or AMD-V/SVM (AMD) extensions for their cpus.

Mark Shuttleworth: Sensory immersion

Filed under
Ubuntu

It was Joi who first described the World of Warcraft scene to me. I was impressed with the scale of it all. But what really intrigued me was Joi’s description of how he’s wiring up a room in his house to be a sort of portal into that other virtual world. Second Life of course brings a new twist to the idea of immersion.

Also: Ubuntu Weekly News

Crossing the OS Divide With Linux

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux is fast becoming my operating system of choice because it lacks the software bloat and high overhead plaguing both Microsoft and Apple computing. Those words do not come easily to me. I have been a devout Windows user from the early days.

How to Switch Between GDM and KDM on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

If you have installed the Kubuntu desktop on top of Ubuntu or the other way around, you may want to switch from gdm to kdm, or from kdm to gdm. This is an easy thing to do.

Full Tip.

Also:
How To Switch to Console Mode for Ubuntu VMware Guest

Free Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

I use Ubuntu Linux. Have done since the day it was released. And I like it. However, I’ve had more than one argument with Jono about what I perceive as its increasing move towards encouragement of non-free software.

Can Linux Handle Federal Demands?

Filed under
Linux

On December 20, 2006, scale-up Linux experts will come together in an interactive online event to examine the present and future of large scale-up Linux systems and to determine whether they are ready to meet the demands of today’s most challenging applications.

IDC thinks Microsoft will drive people to Linux

Filed under
Linux

IDC HAS GOT out its crystal ball for 2007 and the omens don't look good for Microsoft, it predicts. It reckons Microsoft's anti-piracy efforts on client operating systems will backfire, and that will drive customers towards Linux.

Payback time for Novell

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Software

When it became clear that SCO wouldn’t prevail, Microsoft expected only to face close partner IBM. Microsoft did not brace for Novell, an adversary with a decades-long score to settle with Redmond. Through discovery, Microsoft’s correspondence with SCO is, or soon will be in, Novell’s hands, and it’s a safe bet that it will contain more than demand for a license fee and a copy of a certified check. .

openSUSE 10.2 on the IBM T41 ThinkPad

Filed under
SUSE

My IBM ThinkPad T41 on the other hand is my primary work computer. It goes to the trade shows, it runs VMware, and most importantly, it is where I read my email and calendar. With Evolution. Off an MS Exchange 2003 server. The last Distro I had running on the T41 that was working well for this is Fedora Core 6. I used past tense there because the comments on the last post made me decide to put openSUSE 10.2 on the T41 on my first day of vacation.

Secure email servers from scratch with FreeBSD 6 (Part 2)

Filed under
HowTos

In the last article we parted ways after configuring a base FreeBSD system, enabling it with upgrades via cvsup and portsupgrade, and securing it with a simple ipfw2 firewall. The previous article created a solid foundation which this article will build on, covering the configuration of Postfix, amavisd-new, ClamAV, SpamAssassin, MySQL and finally SquirrelMail for web mail. The final setup will have all the bells and whistles of a high end-mail setup.

Debian: server yes, desktop no

Filed under
Linux

I recently decided to retire Red Hat 7 after seven years of loyal service as a firewall/router-OS on my home LAN. Like a red-headed stepchild grown old, it had become cranky from extended neglect, and no longer would even shutdown or reboot without issuing nasty messages. So, after downloading/burning the latest Debian 3.1 R4 net install CD, I popped it into the K6 box's CD drive and booted her up.

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Debian and Ubuntu News

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  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • qutebrowser v0.8.1
  • Anonymous publishing with Riffle
    Preserving anonymity online is an understandably hot topic these days. But it can be confused with related concepts like privacy and secure communication. A new protocol called Riffle was recently published [PDF] by researchers at MIT; it offers a different take on anonymity than that implemented by other projects. A Riffle network could be used to implement an anonymous but verifiable blogging or publishing platform: one in which the messages are visible to everyone, but the identity of all users remains hidden. For comparison, the most well-known anonymity project is, no doubt, Tor, which enables users to access Internet services without revealing their physical location on the network. It is possible to use Tor to access publishing services like Twitter and, thus, to broadcast content to the Internet at large without revealing one's identity. But Tor is just as useful at solving other problems, such as accessing remote servers that are blocked by a firewall. While important, that usage of Tor does not necessarily involve anonymity; one could, for instance, use it to log in to Facebook, and Tor alone does not prevent the use of web trackers by sites. Furthermore, Tor is the focus of near-constant attacks (against the network itself and against the algorithms that keep it working), and it may be vulnerable to large-scale traffic analysis—such as a national ISP could perform. One of the stated goals of Riffle is to prevent such traffic analysis, which has led to popular reports and online discussions referring to Riffle as a Tor competitor. But Riffle, in fact, tackles a narrower problem set. In a Riffle network, every message sent or file uploaded is eventually published in plaintext form where everyone can see it. The Riffle protocol offers strong guarantees that the identity of the message's uploader cannot be discovered—even in cases where multiple servers in the network have been compromised.
  • Announcing Serval!
    Serval is launching on Tuesday the 2nd of August, 2016. It will be available under the GPLv2 and is completely free to use.
  • Tangent Animation studio will support the Blender Institute to hire two devs full time to work on Blender 2.8 and a third one for Cycles
  • 5 Best Calendar Apps for Linux Desktop
    Time is money, as goes an old saying, therefore you need to manage it very well. This then calls for proper planning of your daily schedule, future events, appointments and several other daily activities.
  • Pandora Client `Pithos` Sees New Major Release
    Pithos 1.2.0 was released today and it includes a new explicit content filter option, new dialog design, along with other improvements and important bug fixes.
  • Terminix Now Available In PPA For Ubuntu 16.04 And Linux Mint 18 [Quick Update]
    Terminix was uploaded to the Debian Sid repositories recently. To make it easier to install and stay up to date with the latest Terminix versions, I used the official Debian packaging (thanks to the packagers!) and created a Terminix PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 and Linux Mint 18.
  • Geary – A Good Looking Modern Email Client for Linux
    Geary is a free and open source email client. It’s simple to setup and install, in a few minutes your done. No need to add extra features or add ons to install, it just works. The user interface is the easiest and simplest to use.
  • PVS-Studio confesses its love for Linux
    This post is about love. About the love of the static code analyzer PVS-Studio, for the great open source Linux operating system. This love is young, touching and fragile. It needs help and care. You will help greatly if you volunteer to help testing the beta-version of PVS-Studio for Linux.