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Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Aggregate System Menu arrives for Shell 3.10 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 7:24pm
Story Tips To Make Ubuntu Look Cool srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:35pm
Story Features Approved This Week For Fedora 20 srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:33pm
Story The H is closing down srlinuxx 2 19/07/2013 - 5:30pm
Story ROSA Desktop R1 GNOME preview srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:27pm
Story A Planetary Nebula That Looks Like the Firefox Logo srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 3:57pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 9:19am
Story Debian Tops Our Community Distro Poll srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:43am
Story nano vs. vim: Terminal Text Editors Compared srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:42am
Story ROSA Recruits Fresh GNOME Desktop srlinuxx 19/07/2013 - 5:40am

Is Open Source the Best Way to Unlock the Value of IT?

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: Open source is truly the best way to unlock the value of information technology, Michael Tiemann, president of the Open Source Initiative, said at the annual Gartner Open Source Summit here Sept. 20.

Growing Linux Desktop market share

Filed under
Linux

gh-linux.blogspot: Now, I think a few of the "7 reasons" are bogus and irrelevent but a few are close to correct. And, the premise that this is not the Year of the Linux Desktop, and that next year is probably not the Year of the Linux Desktop is valid.

Got more than a gig of RAM and 32-bit Linux? Here's how to use it

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Nowadays, many machines are running with 2-4 gigabytes of RAM, and their owners are discovering a problem: When they run 32-bit GNU/Linux distributions, their extra RAM is not being used. Fortunately, correcting the problem is only a matter of installing or building a kernel with a few specific parameters enabled or disabled.

Linux and its identity crisis

Filed under
Linux

c|net blogs: If you've been following the current rift in the Linux community between Linus Torvalds and his minions squaring off against Con Kolivas and the mainstream Linux fanatics, you probably know that it's getting quite heated.

See the Harvest Moon Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Filed under
Sci/Tech

iTWire: A Harvest Moon is a full Moon that appears closest to the autumnal equinox, which occurs in 2007 on September 23 in the northern hemisphere. The name “Harvest Moon” is named so because farmers are able to work later at night “harvesting” their crops due to the reflected light coming off of the full Moon.

The Applets of KDE - Part 2

Filed under
KDE

raiden's realm: Welcome to part 2 of our series on the Applets of KDE. So let's continue to look at what's available in KDE.

People of openSUSE: Seth Arnold

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Today you can read which answers to the ‘People of openSUSE’ questions the AppArmor developer Seth Arnold provides. Immunix was acquired by Novell just over two years ago, and since then I’ve been working to help improve AppArmor for wider use — we would like AppArmor to be included in the mainline Linux kernel, so that more people could enjoy the benefits of easy mandatory access control.

Mandriva Linux 2008 RC2 released

Filed under
MDV

adamw: Mandriva Linux 2008 RC2 ‘Kepler’ was released today. New features since the release of RC1 include the final release of GNOME 2.20, the inclusion of the new 8.41.7 version of ATI’s proprietary driver in the non-free repository to support Radeon HD cards, significant kernel updates that improve support for certain ATA controllers and many audio chipsets, some new features in the urpmi and rpmdrake package management tools.

The state of 64bit Distros

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Others

When will they improve? Its long been the case, the Linux, has offered, a decent round up of 64bit distros, most of the big players offer one, Fedora, Suse, Ubuntu, Debian (I know its essentially the same thing), Gentoo.. I feel not enough is being done with these 64bit variants, in what is becoming a very big market.

Defending Openness

Filed under
OSS

Linux Journal: Things have been going pretty well for open source and open standards recently. First, there was the implosion of the SCO case. Then we had the rejection of Microsoft's request for a fast-track approval of its OOXML rival to ODF. Finally, the European Court of First Instance has refused Microsoft's request for an annulment of the terms imposed by the European Commission. Open source and open standards have made huge strides, but in other areas - open access and open data, for example - the fight is only beginning.

Gartner: No New Unix Apps to Emerge After 2009

Filed under
OS

eWeek: There are unlikely to be any new applications developed solely for Unix after 2009, George Weiss, a Gartner vice president and distinguished analyst, told attendees at Gartner's annual Open Source Summit here Sept. 20. Linux is now "good enough" for some 80 percent of the applications and environments that exist today.

Mandriva simplifies its new range of products: Mandriva Linux 2008

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva PR: With this new release, Mandriva is upgrading its commercial offer around a single unified product: Mandriva Linux Powerpack. Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2008 unifies the former Discovery and Powerpack+ editions. Mandriva Linux 2008 will also be available for download free-of-charge as a single live/install CD.

A bid farewell to Singapore's open source advocate

Filed under
Obits

ZDNet: He wasn't one who went with the flow, and was widely regarded as an outspoken advocate of the open source movement in Singapore. Cheok Beng Teck, CIO of the country's Ministry of Defense (Mindef), chartered the way that saw the government body embrace--almost unabashedly--an open source strategy that few in the public sector would have been as comfortable adopting.

Hands on: A word in your shell

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HowTos

ITweek: Recently we have concentrated on the desktop aspects of Linux, particularly on the Ubuntu Linux distributions. This time we will move away from the desktop and instead take a look at the shell environment, which needlessly terrorises many newcomers to Linux and Unix.

One Backend fer 'em all

Filed under
Software

bheekly.blogspot.com: I had always looked at Ubuntu's 'Add/Remove Programs' app (gnome-app-install) and wondered whether it would ever become cross-platform and bring its unique simplicity to other desktops. Then, a few days ago, I came across PackageKit on #gnome-journal. At first I could not believe what I was reading, the cross-platform application installer I had always fantasized of was here at last! Over time, my enthusiasm faded.

MEPIS AntiX on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: I snagged the AntiX ISO after a comment left elsewhere here, and while I’m not a big Fluxbox fan, I find this to be one of the most pleasant setups I’ve seen yet.

Open source software for architects

Filed under
Software

linux.com: When I began my career as an assistant architect 12 years ago, I used AutoCAD R12, 3D Studio, CorelDraw 6.0, and Photoshop 4.0 for architectural drawing and 3-D modeling. Today, many architects still use their later versions, but those bulky packages provide many functions an architect will never use. Luckily, there are several open source alternatives.

Switch Between Gnome And KDE Desktops In Ubuntu Or Kubuntu

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HowTos

watching the net: If you have been using Ubuntu, which uses Gnome as the default desktop, or Kubuntu which uses KDE as the desktop, and have been wondering what the other desktop looks like, you can easily install KDE or Gnome and switch back and forth before logging on to Ubuntu.

Hardware Can Be Open, Too

Filed under
Hardware

linuxplanet: With open source software becoming a household name, another open source movement that may one day see some fanfare is already taking shape. Open source hardware, which I once thought to be little more than a pipe dream left over from a bygone era, is proving to be a dream that it is very much alive and growing.

Should We Listen to Walt Mossberg?

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux online: Walter Mossberg, an influential tech columnist who writes primarily for the Wall Street Journal, wrote a piece the other day in which he said that Linux still wasn't ready for mainstream users. Linux enthusiasts like myself see a piece like this from such a high-profile columnist as a tremendous setback for our work.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi based computer offers Real-Time Ethernet

Hilscher is prepping a rugged “netPI” computer that combines a Raspberry Pi 3 with its “netHAT 52-RTE” RPi add-on featuring dual Real-Time Ethernet ports. German Real-Time Ethernet experts Hilscher will soon launch a Raspberry Pi 3-based industrial computer with Real-Time Ethernet support. Hilscher has yet to formally announce the ruggedized netPI computer, but the board was demonstrated at the recent Embedded World show, and was revealed in a Mar. 27 Element14 Community blog by Shabaz. The system can be used as a Real-Time Ethernet gateway or controller, and it supports add-ons such as sensors or actuators to enable additional applications, writes Shabaz. Read more

GNOME Migration and Slideshow

  • The Linux Migration: Corporate Collaboration, Part 2
    Note that a number of folks have suggested alternative calendar applications. I’ve rejected these so far because I don’t think they’ll fit into my workflow or my environment, but they may work for others. Some of the applications I’ve seen suggested include Rainlendar, Calcurse, or KOrganizer. Some of these applications address some of the shortcomings of GNOME Calendar, but none of them address all the major issues I’ve outlined here (based on my testing thus far).
  • GNOME 3.24 Provides Users With More Pleasing Linux Desktop Experience

Dowry to Linux Foundation From NSA Ally

  • AT&T takes up membership in the Linux Foundation, furthers open source efforts
    AT&T has become a Platinum member in the Linux Foundation, a move that reflects the telco’s ongoing effort to implement open source and open networks not only in its own networks but also to drive broader industry collaboration. One example of this is AT&T's Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy (ECOMP) architecture. In February, AT&T contributed several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
  • AT&T Joins The Linux Foundation as a Platinum Member
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced that AT&T has become a Platinum member. This follows news of the company’s contribution of several million lines of ECOMP code to The Linux Foundation, as well as the new Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) Project based on production-ready code from AT&T and OPEN-O contributors.

GNU/Linux on Servers: VisionMobile Report, Cilium, Microservices, and Kubernetes

  • VisionMobile Report Lays Out Developer Salaries by Skill, Software Sector, and Location
    In 2017, that means skilled cloud and backend developers, as well as those who work in emerging technologies including Internet of Things (IoT), machine learning and augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR) can make more money -- tens or sometimes hundreds of times more -- than frontend web and mobile developers whose skills have become more commoditized. “In Western Europe, for example, the median backend developer earns 12% more than the median web developer; a machine learning developer makes 28% more,” according to the report.
  • Cilium leverages Linux kernel for advanced container networking
    Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier. Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.
  • Modules vs. microservices
    Much has been said about moving from monoliths to microservices. Besides rolling off the tongue nicely, it also seems like a no-brainer to chop up a monolith into microservices. But is this approach really the best choice for your organization? It’s true that there are many drawbacks to maintaining a messy monolithic application. But there is a compelling alternative which is often overlooked: modular application development. In this article, we'll explore what this alternative entails and show how it relates to building microservices.
  • What Is Kubernetes?
    Kubernetes is open source software for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. The project is governed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which is hosted by The Linux Foundation. And it’s quickly becoming the Linux of the cloud, says Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. Running a container on a laptop is relatively simple. But connecting containers across multiple hosts, scaling them when needed, deploying applications without downtime, and service discovery among several aspects, are really hard challenges. Kubernetes addresses those challenges with a set of primitives and a powerful API.