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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GCC 5 at Phoronix Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:52am
Story CS:GO & TF2 Extensively Tested On The Newest Open-Source Radeon Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:48am
Blog entry Vacation Photos Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 5:38am
Story 6 tips for adopting open source Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:36am
Story AMD's HSA Run-Time Library Is Now Open-Source Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:28am
Story Shrunken SODIMM-style Cortex-A9 COM delivers the goods Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:22am
Story Scholarship Winner Sandeep Aryal Aims to Bring Open Source to Nepal Rianne Schestowitz 14/11/2014 - 1:18am
Story Canonical to Announce Development Partnership with Major Telecom Company – Video Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2014 - 9:28pm
Story Canonical's Plans For Unity 8 & Mir In Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 13/11/2014 - 9:17pm
Story ownCloud Enables True Universal File Access via Cloud Service Roy Schestowitz 13/11/2014 - 8:00pm

Pressure, progress flow at Linux Plumbers Conference

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group.com: This week’s Linux Plumbers Conference in Portland was a great opportunity for many of the Linux kernel community people to get together, challenge one another, hash out some differences and hone their similarities and synergies. What strikes me as perhaps most interesting is that while there was some discord felt throughout the event among the different Linux camps, this conglomerate of developers representing a range of different vendors in a variety of different ways all do one thing common to all of them: push the kernel forward.

Free Riders, Canonical and Greg KH

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org/weblogs/amanda: On Wednesday kernel developer and Novell fellow Greg KH opened the first annual Linux Plumbers Conference with a keynote aimed squarely at the team behind Ubuntu, Canonical. I think Greg could have used the opportunity to inspire more than attack, but Greg obviously feels strongly about the necessity for upstream development. It’s also Greg being Greg: I believe he carries around a spoon just in case he encounters a hornets’ nest.

Giveaway celebrates open source

Filed under
OSS

stuff.co.nz: Free software is being distributed today at Waikato University to mark Software Freedom Day an annual international celebration of open source software.

Development Release: openSUSE 11.1 Beta 1 Now Available

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE Project is happy to announce the first beta release of openSUSE 11.1. openSUSE 11.1 includes quite a few improvements and new features over the 11.0 release, including new versions of KDE, GNOME, the Linux kernel, improved YaST modules, and much more!

Just what is up with PCLinuxOS anyway?

Filed under
PCLOS

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: PClinuxOS is a Linux distribution that gets mentioned quite a bit actually. It often is mentioned in the same breath and at the same table when we discuss the "big boy" or commercially supported distributions, like ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSuse, etc...

NVIDIA 177.76 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In the fourth NVIDIA Linux driver release in under a month's time, the 177.76 display driver has been released. This too looks like another beta driver with more fixes in store for those with GeForce or Quadro hardware owners.

Linux Foundation opening doors to individual participation

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: The nonprofit Linux Foundation (LF), which coordinates an assortment of Linux-oriented standardization efforts and employs key developers such as Linux creator Linus Torvalds, has added to its Web site a gateway toward individual -- as opposed to corporate -- membership.

Asus Eee PC 1000 Plus Ubuntu: Big Power in a Small Package

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxplanet.com: ZaReason provided an Asus Eee PC 1000 loaded with Ubuntu Hardy Heron. Basic specs for this unit include a 1.6 GHz Intel Atom processor, 1 GB of memory, a 40 GB Solid State Disk (SSD) drive and a 10-inch screen.

Kernel Log: The second day of Kernel Summit 2008

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Following the release on Tuesday of details about debates and decisions at this year's Kernel Summit, LWN.net has now reported on the second and final day of the conference. Linus Torvalds, Andrew Morton, and some 80 other important and nearly all male kernel developers discussed their approaches to the further development of Linux and exchanged experiences.

Eee PC stuffs opposition at awards bash

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: THE ASUS EEE PC has won the 'Gadget of the Year' gong at the 2008 Stuff Magazine Gadget Awards held at a swanky London hotel earlier this week.

GoblinX Published Xfce 4.5.90 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Linux

GoblinX published a screenshot tour of the Xfce 4.5.90. The tour is a good preview of the next Xfce.

Songbird Rocks!

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: I'm not that picky when it comes to desktop audio player. Typically, I just use whatever audio player that comes with my Linux distro. As long as it plays all of my audio files (with the right plugins of course), I'm good. Until most recently...

The ‘pirate’ manpage, Arrrgggghhhhh!

Filed under
Software

dustinkirkland.wordpress: Aye mates! man pirate … odds are, ye don’t ‘ave pirate installed… Shimmy on o’er t’ http://manpages.ubuntu.com and type in th’ search box: “pirate“.

Review: gNewSense 2.1

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: gNewSense, a Linux distribution put out by the Free Software Foundation, is designed and intended to provide you with a distro completely free of any and all proprietary drivers, software, or codecs. It strives to also be new-user friendly, reliable, and easy to use. But does it really succeed at fulfilling its desires, or does it become a nuisance (pun intended) instead?

Thank you SGI, for freeing the GNU/Linux 3D desktop!

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: In January of 2008, software code at the heart of GNU/Linux 3D applications was discovered to be non-free—a potential disaster for free software advocates hoping to see advanced graphical acceleration now common on modern operating systems.

distro bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Making the Switch from Debian to Ubuntu and Back Again

  • Installing OpenSUSE 10.3 onto a HP nc4010
  • 24 hours with t' Intrepid Alpha

Mandriva unveils Linux for netbooks

Filed under
MDV

vnunet.com: Linux publisher Mandriva has unveiled a version of its platform designed specifically for the new breed of mini laptops.

Canonical Opens Codec Sales and Potential Can of Worms

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: It feels the most positive word that can be applied to this announcement is "bittersweet." There are many more colorfully negative words that are applicable, as well.

Ubuntu's BulletProofX Takes Simpler Step Forward

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Introduced in Ubuntu 7.10 was a feature known as BulletProofX, which provides a fail-safe mode that is by default used when the X server fails to properly initialize. In this original implementation, it would default back to using the VESA display driver. This Canonical implementation also had frustrated other users.

Life without walls.

Filed under
Microsoft

it.toolbox.com/blogs/locutus: Life without walls is the title of microsoft's new advertising campaign. It is yet another example of microsoft taking someone else's idea and trying to claim it as their own. This has put me in rant mode because for a long time there has been a quote floating around in the Linux camp.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
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  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.