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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story F-Spot is still alive srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 11:36pm
Story openSUSE 12.2 with MATE - Not bad at all srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 8:08pm
Story Best Ways to Read E-books on Ubuntu srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 8:03pm
Story GNOME 3.6 Review – Against the Grain srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 8:01pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 5:52pm
Story Firefox 19: new tab strip design incoming srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 5:15pm
Story Linux Does Beer: Raspberry Pi Moonlights as Dutch Brewmeister srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 5:12pm
Story An interview with Allan Day srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 3:04am
Story Open-Source Game Advancing Its GL3 Renderer srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 3:01am
Story LibreOffice Updated to 3.6.2 srlinuxx 05/10/2012 - 3:00am

Linux laptop search isn't that difficult

Filed under
Hardware

the jem report: The big news in the Linux realm for the past few months has been Dell's introduction of Ubuntu-preinstalled computers. The systems themselves are a little low on the quality scale, but so is everything else that Dell makes these days. At least they aren't expensive.

OpenSolaris "Indiana" Information

Filed under
OS

phoronix: This week Sun's Glynn Foster had two presentations on Project Indiana in Australia and Ireland. In the talks Glynn had went over the basic information on what Project Indiana is about as well as sharing other details and listening to feedback from the audience. These slides are now published on the Internet, some of which we will be sharing in this article as well as talking about some of the points.

Why Open Source and Linux Are Losing Momentum

Filed under
OSS

Rob Enderle: This time of year, I make my rounds with the OEMs and get to chat with a number of executives. Several things have floated to the top, but the one I’d like to chat about right now is the comment that Linux demand and interest in open source in general has dropped off sharply.

Open Source Is Dead, Long Live Open Patents?

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: I've been trying to make sense out of the new Version 3 of the General Public License and I've got to tell you, I can't yet. All I can see is that (1) in the short term, the GPLv3 has turned Microsoft's deal with Novell into a hairball Redmond is trying to cough up;

It's official: OLPC and Intel become friends, collaborate

Filed under
OLPC

ars technica: The One Laptop Per Child Project and Intel have put their differences aside, at least for now, as Intel agrees to take a seat on the OLPC Board of Directors. The new "peace" between Intel and OLPC will also involve the project receiving some funding from Intel.

Ubuntu install - First thing to do

Filed under
Ubuntu

pimpyourlinux: A fresh install of Ubuntu reveals a polished desktop, and a well thought out layout. Unfortunately, a fresh install of Ubuntu lacks many programs. In this article, I will show you the first thing that should be done after installing ubuntu.

Lock in productivity with Lockout utility

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: You can stop computer-based slacking -- like the compulsive reloading of Digg or Reddit at the expense of productivity -- with a few changes to your computer's DNS profile, and enforce the changes using Lockout, a tool designed to enforce discipline and increase productivity.

People Behind KDE: Matthias Kretz

Filed under
KDE

After a short break, we return to the next interview in the People Behind KDE series, travelling back to Germany to talk to a developer who wants to make things as simple as possible - for both users and developers. The recent winner of an aKademy Award for Best Non-Application for his work on Phonon - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Matthias Kretz.

The Lesser Apps of KDE - Multimedia

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: Everyone who's ever owned a computer has at one time or another found a need to play some kind of multimedia file. KDE provides a list of built in applications that allow you to do that.

Intel GMA950 & xf86-video-intel 2.1.0

Filed under
Software

phoronix: It was earlier this month that version 2.1.0 of the xf86-video-intel driver was released, which among other things had introduced open-source Linux graphics support. In this article we have enclosed some benchmarks from Intel's GMA 950 IGP using the new xf86-video-intel 2.1.0 driver.

The death of the IM

Filed under
Software

Raiden's Realm: For years IM was the way for me to keep in touch with friends, and make friends, both near and far away. But sometime in late 2001 the wonder, wow and awe of IM'ing began to vanish.

Making Linux interoperable

Filed under
Interviews

expresscomputeronline: Maarten Koster, President, Novell Asia Pacific, talks to Kushal Shah about the different strategies adopted by Novell and the company’s partnership with Microsoft.

BBC to hear open source concerns

Filed under
OSS

BBC News: Calls to make the BBC's on demand TV service work on all computer operating systems are to get a fresh look.

GIMP 2.2.17 Released

Filed under
GIMP

Due to a regression in the PSD loader that was introduced with the 2.2.16 release, we had to roll out another release in the stable 2.2 series.

The Most Suitable Distros for Linux Dummy

Filed under
Linux

linuxdummies.com: The most suitable distros for a total Linux dummy are Freespire, OpenSUSE, Mandriva, and Ubuntu, according to online test called Linux Distribution Chooser.

Gimp Tutorial - Metallic Text

Filed under
HowTos

Penguin Pete: I figured the old chrome-text tutorial over at the Gimp User Group site could use both an update and an enhancement of technique. Mine is done on Gimp version 2.2.13.

Installing Zabbix (Server And Agent) On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Zabbix is a solution for monitoring applications, networks, and servers. With Zabbix, you can monitor multiple servers at a time, using a Zabbix server that comes with a web interface (that is used to configure Zabbix and holds the graphs of your systems) and Zabbix agents that are installed on the systems to be monitored.

Government agencies embracing open source: AGIMO

Filed under
OSS

ZDNet: Federal government agencies are adopting free and open source software (FOSS) with increasing zeal, according to a new study undertaken by the Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO).

Pardus 2007.2 - A Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

shift+backspace: The latest installment of Pardus, version 2007.2, was officially released on, July 12, 2007. Pardus is a relatively new distribution based on GNU/Linux. The image file for Pardus 2007.2 comes in at around 700MB, but is also available in a 700MB live CD flavour. Please note that the live CD is NOT capable of installing the system onto your hard drive like you can with most live CDs.

Open Source Semantic Desktop Is Coming

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: PC users have volumes of information saved on their computers, most of it disconnected and disparate save for a basic directory system. The answer to connecting all the information into a local semantic Web of information is closer than you might think.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News