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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 15 KDE review srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 3:50pm
Story Day 24: More Secure By Default srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 2:39pm
Story Tuxera Claims NTFS Is The Fastest File-System For Linux srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 5:51am
Story VirtualBSD review - Sneak a peak at FreeBSD srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 5:49am
Story Bitcoin - I Hardly Knew Ya srlinuxx 25/06/2011 - 5:48am
Story Debian Dumps OpenOffice for LibreOffice srlinuxx 1 25/06/2011 - 4:55am
Story Mozilla to enterprise customers: "Drop dead" srlinuxx 1 25/06/2011 - 4:54am
Story Linux is all growed up now srlinuxx 1 25/06/2011 - 4:53am
Story A Quick Look at Sabayon 6 srlinuxx 1 25/06/2011 - 4:52am
Story Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal review srlinuxx 1 25/06/2011 - 4:50am

Test of current RealPlayer/HelixPlayer nightly builds

Filed under
Software

After I wondered what the current state of the HelixPlayer/RealPlayer development is I asked the developers. The answer was that there is still no date given, but that I could help them by testing the players in my setup. And since that isn’t difficult at all I downloaded the rpms and gave them a try.

Run new packages on older distros with backports

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Software

If you run a stable system, you don't have to miss out on the latest and greatest releases of your favorite applications -- just use a backport to get a package of a new release that's been "back-ported" to your older distribution.

Ubuntu Quicktip - Converting Mac .dmg images into .iso images

Filed under
HowTos

I recently came across a handy script that allows you to convert a Mac OSX or Apple’s iPod (iPod firmware generated images) to standard .iso files.

GIMP 2.3.14 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Version 2.3.14 is another development snapshot to wet your appetite for the upcoming GIMP 2.4 release. The source code can be downloaded from the usual places.

Jono Bacon: Misinformation: The Enemy Of Community

Filed under
OSS

Building and running communities is hard work. What is seen by some as simply a means of providing enough hands on deck to get things done is actually a much larger and more complex web of relationships, politics, resources and diplomacy.

Linspire's CNR to go multi-Linux, remain free

Filed under
Software

Linspire announced today that it plans to expand its CNR ("Click 'N Run") digital download and software management service to support multiple desktop Linux distributions beyond Linspire and Freespire, initially adding Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu, using both .deb and .rpm packages. And, the standard CNR service will remain free.

Wal Mart endorses Novell, Microsoft deal

Filed under
SUSE

Wal Mart is a huge fan of the Novell-Microsoft collaboration, it said today. It already uses lots of Microsoft products inhouse and had pressed vendors to provide intellectual property assurance for quite a while.

Also: HP doesn't like Linux

Tee for two

Filed under
Software

For all the console warriors out there I am sure you know about shell redirection and piping the output of commands to another command or to a file. Those pipes are not made of glass so if you want to monitor the data as it flows through the pipe you are out of luck. There is a solution.

Why 2007 Won't Be the Year of Linux (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

It used to be that every January, you'd see a number of articles talking about why Linux was destined to take off in the coming year. If I were good at using spreadsheets (I prefer my 'text file / awk / bc' method), I could present you with a graph showing the decline in these public displays of optimism over the years. Now here we are in January of 2007 and a search on Google's news page has not come up with one writer willing to make the claim that 2007 will be the year Linux ``makes it''.

UK ISP devotes profits to foster OSS development

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OSS

In 2003, Jason Clifford started an Internet service provider (ISP) in Hertfordshire, England, called UK Free Software Network. What sets UKFSN apart from other ISPs is the fact that it gives away its profits to fund students working on free and open source software (FOSS) projects.

Gimmie: A New Panel for Gnome

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HowTos

Gimmie is an elegant way to think about how you use your desktop computer.Gimmie is a new concept of the panel designed to shift the direction of the desktop beyond the standard WIMP model (Windows, Icons, Menu, Pointer) towards one directly representing the concepts that modern desktop users use every day. It is being considered for inclusion in Gnome 3.0.

Will OLPC change Linux?

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

During a tutorial that Chris Blizzard gave at Linux.conf.au, there were quite a few interesting ideas and concepts raised that presented an interesting blueprint for Linux in the future.

OpenSuse 10.2 Review

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Reviews
SUSE

I looked at OpenSuse 10.2 as a Win2k replacement. I’ve been impressed with Suse over the years so I was looking forward to see what Novell brought to the table with 10.2. I am not going to judge a distribution on its setup process (OS installation, mp3 setup, flash setup, adding printer, etc), however I am going to mention some installation pitfalls I ran into during the 10.2 install.

Ubuntu founder doesn't "get" enterprise Linux

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Ubuntu

OK, that's not really true. Mark is a sharp guy, and gets open source as well, indeed, better, than most. But he's completely wrong on his criticism of Red Hat (which Greg of the Fedora Project shoots down). His basic point? Because RHEL is a closed binary, it's proprietary.

Dan Bricklin Wants to Pick Your Brain re Novell-Microsoft Meeting

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SUSE

Dan Bricklin is hosting a meeting on Monday from 9AM to noon sponsored by the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council on the Novell-Microsoft deal. I know. Blech. But both Microsoft and Novell are sending representatives to speak, and what Dan is asking for is this: what should he ask them?

openSUSE 10.2

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Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE is a widely known distribution for its huge array of unique tools for managing virtually every part of the system, without having to even think about using the console. It’s also known for the stability of the official packages and releases, and it’s known for a very stable package-system.

A picture heavy look at PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta2

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PCLOS

As I covered yesterday, PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta2 has been released to the public and I've had a chance to play with it and I think it's fair to make the conclusion that this is a distro worth keeping an eye on.

The (computer) World is a Circle

Filed under
Linux

It is a given these days that Linux is making real inroads into the corporate glass house. We (BMC) certainly have a large number of our product lines ported to it, and therefore a wide swath of systems in the R&D data center to support those development efforts. I originally started this weblog last year (and 99 posts ago) to talk about those systems and how we use, maintain, and generally support Linux here. I called this “Adventures in Linux” to be sure I can digress from time to time. Linux is a big subject.

Planning the 2007 Linux Kernel Summit

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Linux

Theodore Ts'o announced that the 2007 Linux Kernel Summit will be moved from its usual location in Ottawa, Canada, taking place this year in Cambridge, England. Ted described the move as a one-time experiment to be re-evaluated at a future date to see if it's worth moving the Kernel Summit to other locations in the future.

BlueFish & NVU vs Dreamweaver: A Linux Web-Publishing review-comparison

Filed under
Software

Recently I was expressing the need for Dreamweaver in Linux, because my company website was built on Dreamweaver. Someone said that I should try NVU. And when I specified that I wanted a heavy-duty web-development package, he suggested Bluefish. I of course hadn’t heard of these packages, and eventually gave them a try.

Also: ksnapshot vs gnome-screenshot: no comparison!

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More in Tux Machines

Linux at 25: How Linux changed the world

I walked into an apartment in Boston on a sunny day in June 1995. It was small and bohemian, with the normal detritus a pair of young men would scatter here and there. On the kitchen table was a 15-inch CRT display married to a fat, coverless PC case sitting on its side, network cables streaking back to a hub in the living room. The screen displayed a mess of data, the contents of some logfile, and sitting at the bottom was a Bash root prompt decorated in red and blue, the cursor blinking lazily. I was no stranger to Unix, having spent plenty of time on commercial Unix systems like OSF/1, HP-UX, SunOS, and the newly christened Sun Solaris. But this was different. Read more

Linux Kernel News and Microsoft Breaks PowerShell

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Android Leftovers

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Comparison of the Samsung Z1 vs Z2 vs Z3 Tizen smartphones

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