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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 27 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Trouble With Open-Source Doom 3 srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:10am
Story 40 years of Intel CPUs srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:04am
Story Hollywood and Congress Target Mozilla srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 5:01am
Story Learning from GNOME srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:12am
Story Unix and Linux: a bit of history srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:10am
Story Almost openSUSE 12.1 srlinuxx 16/11/2011 - 1:08am
Poll Fav Distro (nov '11) srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:40pm
Story KDE vs. Trinity: Is One Really Better? srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:22pm
Story Mandriva Linux Powerpack 2011 is here srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:20pm
Story Ubuntu 11.11 is the new Mac OS X ? srlinuxx 15/11/2011 - 10:11pm

Firefox captures users with its add-on tools

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Tens of millions of Internet users have switched to the Firefox Web browser, often for its protection from scammers and spyware writers who generally tailor their coded mischief for Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser.

But security isn't the only virtue to Firefox.

Mozilla: Why Desktop E-Mail Crucifies the Browser

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In an era when applications are moving into the web browser, the maker of the world's most popular open-source e-mail client wants you to stay on the desktop. Later this month, Mozilla will release Thunderbird 2, the latest version of its cross-platform e-mail application. The current version, 1.5, has almost 50 million users worldwide and has been translated into 35 languages.

This Week's KDE Commit-Digest

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This week in the KDE Commit-Digest we find some really nice goodies. Of course there are plenty of the less glamorous but quite necessary commits as well. All together, things are proceding along at an exciting pace.

Brasero does the CD burning job in GNOME

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My system76 desktop machine came with a CD-RW/DVD-RW drive that I’ve finally got around to trying out. I wasn’t too concerned about how it would work with GNU/Linux, since I suspected CD and DVD burning should be relatively well-supported by now. Of course, you never know until you try.

openSUSE Linux : Helping the world avoid unnecessary agony

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My brother and I presented our father with a new AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 3800+ machine that we got him for his birthday. He was excited and surprised, which came as no surprise.

Gaim nicer notifications with libnotify on Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

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Gaim (now renamed to Pidgin, but the version I’m using isn’t that new) comes with a “guifications” plugin to do “notifications”, those little popup “toast” messages to tell you that someone’s messaged you, someone’s logged on or off, all that sort of thing.

How To Build A New Freetype

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I've had several requests for my RPM for freetype2 including sub-pixel rendering for openSUSE 10.2. So here are instructions on how to build your own, including my modified SPEC file. If you're in the USA it might be illegal to download my file, so this file is only for people who live in free countries. Or at least semi-free countries, like the UK.

1. Download freetype2 source rpm

Disabling unused daemons to speed up your boot sequence

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Many Linux distros usually start a lot of daemons when booting, resulting in a long wait before you can get to work after powering on your machine. Some of those daemons are rarely used (or even not al all) by the majority of users. This tutorial describes how to disable unused or rarely used daemons in a proper way, resulting in faster boot sequences and less CPU load.

debug a currently running program with GDB

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Here is a quick tips of GDB. There is a time when I was working on a module that was written in c/c++ hangs in the middle of execution. I have no clue how it happens, and it happens quite rare. I keep guessing and try to feed in more debug print lines to search for the cause of the hangs. Spend few days with no luck, but suddenly I thought of GDB.

Upgrade Debian Sarge to Debian Etch

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Before upgrading your system, it is strongly recommended that you make a full backup, or at least back up any data or configuration information you can’t afford to lose. The upgrade tools and process are quite reliable, but a hardware failure in the middle of an upgrade could result in a severely damaged system

I'm JADed !

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In my apparently never-ending quest to revive and refresh my aging 32-bit box I decided to try installing the JAD (JackLab Audio Distribution) system. To recapitulate the source of woe with this particular machine, I'll remind readers that its PS2 ports are physically damaged, forcing me to switch my mouse and keyboard to the USB ports (the problem has something to do with the HID module).

Debian Just Died

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Sam Hocevar was elected the new DPL: Debian Project Leader Election 2007 Results.

It's useless to ask "how many voted for Sam", because the Debian elections are using an advanced Condorcet voting system with Schwartz Sequential Dropping, to guarantee that the winner is the candidate that is the less hated, if I am allowed to put it this way.

Review of SimplyMepis 6.5

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Here we are again, another day and another newly released distro. This time I'm investigating the popular SimplyMepis 6.5 which seems to have a thriving community and a strong base of supporters so it seems only right to give this new release the normal treatement.

Command line tips - seeing how much disk space is left with df

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t’s time for another command line tip today - and that is how to see how much disk space you have left overall on a particular partition.

It’s always good to know how much space you have left, especially when you’re about to leap into a backup, wget a big file or do some other process which needs a lot of space.

Dreamlinux 2.2 RC1 Multimedia GL Screenshots

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Hitting the web a few days ago was the first release candidate for the multimedia GL edition of Dreamlinux 2.2. This new release is built against the Debian testing repository, the multimedia plugins and codecs have been updated, and this release also includes Beryl 0.2 final. This release does also include the latest proprietary drivers from NVIDIA and ATI.

Goodbye Windows, Hello Linux

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Well it’s been a year since I gave up Windows for a life of Linux and was I wise to embark on such a voyage?

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 released

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The Debian Project is pleased to announce the official release of Debian GNU/Linux version 4.0, codenamed etch, after 21 months of constant development. Debian GNU/Linux is a free operating system which supports a total of eleven processor architectures and includes the KDE, GNOME and Xfce desktop environments.

Why Use Software Illegally When You Can Use Legally ….

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If you run Linux and install free software, you won’t have to worry about this ever again!

Multiplier maximizes productivity

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One of the most exciting of many projects under way at R Cubed Technologies is the Multiplied Linux Desktop Strategy.

Working with one of its partners, Omni Technologies of Canada, R Cubed has developed a system that allows up to 10 students to work at the same time with a single Linux PC. Novell Equipment runs the multiplied software.

Microsoft patents are striking again!

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Funny thing, I noticed this because someone complained about encountering the side-effects of Microsoft patents on ClearType in... openSUSE 10.2!

James Ots noticed that Sub-pixel Antialiasing in openSUSE 10.2 seems to be broken, so he recompiled the package from sources, with sub-pixel antialiasing turned on.

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KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.