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Monday, 18 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 9:23am
Story The Story Behind 'init' and 'systemd': Why 'init' Needed to be Replaced with 'systemd' in Linux Roy Schestowitz 1 06/09/2014 - 9:10am
Story Creativity and KDE Rianne Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 7:57am
Story Cumulus Networks Partners for Open Source Networking OS Rianne Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 6:56am
Story Systemd Cheatsheet, This Week's Fedora Delay, Ubuntu Disparaged Rianne Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 6:38am
Story HP announces two new ultra-thin Chrombooks Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 2:12am
Story Running Your Business on Linux (No, You Don't Need Windows) Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 1:27am
Story Calculate Linux 14 released Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:55am
Story Matthew Garrett's Advice on Hardware, Linux Kernel Careers, and Fruit Flies Roy Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:52am
Story MIPS aims new 64-bit Warrior cores at mobile devices Rianne Schestowitz 06/09/2014 - 12:02am

Who Will Win As Linux Market Consolidates?

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: Two small Linux companies are merging. What does it mean to Linux market leaders like Red Hat, Novell and Ubuntu — and Linux customers? Here are some clues from The VAR Guy.

Linux conference calls for papers

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: The fact that organising Australia's national Linux conference is fully a year's work has been brought home with the announcement by the organisers of LCA 2009, or linux.conf.au as it is better known, that ideas for papers can be submitted.

AltSearch for OOo Writer functionality trumps first impressions

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: Alternative Find and Replace for Writer (AltSearch) has the ambitious goal of replacing and enhancing one of the most basic pieces of OpenOffice.org functionality. It's undermined by a chaotic interface, but if you have the patience to continue past first impressions, you will find AltSearch comes far closer to fulfilling its promise than you might initially imagine

Linux for housewives. XP for geeks.

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet: Retailers and contract manufacturers in Taiwan say that novice PC users there, like students and housewives, tend to buy the Linux version of the Eee PC701, while geeks go for Windows XP. Does that sound backwards?

Why Aren’t All Linux Live CDs Customizable?

Filed under
Linux

chris.pirillo.com: I don’t use Linux as my operating system, but I do have several Linux live CDs. The problem that I always have with live CDs for Linux is that when they’re built, they include things I would never include. Or, they don’t put in things that I feel I should have. At Custom NimbleX, you can easily create your own customized version of Linux.

Move Your Business from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: Making the switch from Windows to Linux will incur some costs as employees and support staff adjust to the new system's configuration settings, utilities, and applications. Even so, the savings in future hardware and software upgrades could be huge.

A Journey to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

montanalinux.org: My first Linux installation took place circa 1992, I pulled my hair out for a month or so while I was trying to figure out how to install this very interesting and FREE operating system. Wow, Linux has gone a long way since my first install.

The Swiss Army Distro - Might Someone Finally Be Getting It?

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: One of the things that's bothered me to no end for quite a while is the ridiculously huge number of Linux distributions out there. 350+ active or semi-active and nearly 200 dead distros is rather pathetic in my opinion. It would not be hard at all to merge all of those distributions into one "jack of all trades" distribution.

Fedora 9: Was it worth the wait?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: As many of you know, a while back I was converted to Ubuntu. Currently running (happily I might add) Ubuntu 7.10, I have had no need to return to my Red Hat roots. Of course being a writer in this industry, it behoves me to make sure I am up to date on the latest, greatest software. So I decided it was necessary that I install Fedora 9.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Rename Files in Bulk from the Command Line

  • Nautilus search
  • Adding a service in Fedora

Gentoo Linux 2008.0

Filed under
Gentoo

phoronix.com: In recent times the Gentoo Linux and its foundation has been plagued with a multitude of problems and times have certainly been challenging for this once popular distribution. It's already July and we are now finally seeing Gentoo's first official release of the year.

KDE 3 vs KDE 4: It’s Finally Over

Filed under
KDE

jonreagan.wordpress: Recently there has been quite a karfuffle surrounding several people’s disagreement over the direction of KDE 4. As many of you know, KDE 4 is not yet complete, and is far different from it’s ancestor, KDE 3. The arguments have seemingly quieted down, and finally there has been some closure on the debate.

Buddi - Simple Personal Budgeting

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Many financial applications, such as KMyMoney, can be very useful, however there is often quite a learning curve associated with them. Buddi is an open source personal budgeting application for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X that is designed to keep things very simple.

The Linux Saga: Preface

Filed under
Linux

polishlinux.org: This story begins – as usual – long long time ago, far far away, behind the Ocean, in United States of America, in Bell Laboratories building. In that firm a computer stood. Nothing special about it, but in 1969, when those events started, computer wasn’t commonplace at all. There were no Personal Computers, no Microsoft, IBM or Apple.

Mark Shuttleworth on Ubuntu and the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: He is, without a doubt, the only open source software leader who might be called “dashing.” Young (34), fabulously rich (north of $500 million as of 1999) Mark Shuttleworth buzzes around on his own private jet, the Canonical One. He is also, without a doubt, the open source leader who is most actively shaping the future of the Linux desktop.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #98

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 98 for the weeks June 29nd - July 5th, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 8.04.1 released, Intrepid Alpha 2 due out Thursday, Kubuntu Intrepid news, and much more.

Securing your Ubuntu box, don’t worry it’s easy!

Filed under
Ubuntu

izanbardprince.wordpress: Linux is generally regarded as secure: But as preachy as Ubuntu gets about not using a root terminal, you’d think that they must ship this really secure operating system, right? Well….yes and no.

odds & ends

  • Install the 1.15.2 “no CD” Patch for StarCraft on Ubuntu 8.04

  • Install StarCraft and the BroodWar expansion on Ubuntu 8.04 in Wine
  • Nouveau NV50 KMS Work Continues
  • Top Ten Linux Distributions 2008
  • 13 Command Line Tools for Audio on Linux

Please Vote in My Favorite Desktop Poll

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>> Vote HERE <<

Developing for Linux netbooks

itwire.com: Most all readers will be well aware of the ASUS Eee Linux PC. Other vendors now seek to achieve similar success, the latest being Acer’s Linpus device. Yet, a common complaint is that traditional software doesn’t necessarily translate well to the smaller screens. Here’s my tips for developing software for the emerging and widely popular netbook market.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: Most In-Demand Programming Languages and More

  • Top 7 Most In-Demand Programming Languages Of 2018: Coding Dojo
    Most of the fields in the tech industry demand a regular learning from you as they are dynamic in nature. You need to be up-to-date with the latest trends and make sure that your skillset matches the needs of your target industry. For developers, this change becomes even more necessary. For example, today’s mobile app developers need to eventually make a shift from Java and Objective-C to Kotlin and Swift, respectively. This growing adoption and demand is reflected clearly in different lists of the popular programming languages. [...] Coding Dojo analyzed the data from job listing website Indeed.com. This job posting data revolved around twenty-five programming languages, frameworks, and stacks. It’s worthing noting that some most loved programming languages like Ruby and Swift didn’t make the cut as their demand was lower as compared to other biggies. The other growing languages that didn’t make the cut were R and Rust.
  • The proof is in the pudding
    I wrote these when I woke up one night and had trouble getting back to sleep, and spent a while in a very philosophical mood thinking about life, success, and productivity as a programmer.
  • littler 0.3.3
    The fourth release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later. littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. In my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. Last but not least it is also less silly than Rscript and always loads the methods package avoiding those bizarro bugs between code running in R itself and a scripting front-end.

Games: Project 5: Sightseer, 'Jupiter Hell', Dimension Drive, Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes, Counter-Strike

Liberated Linux Drivers Help AMD 'Transparency'

  • AMD Navi spotted in Linux drivers
    The architecture name is hidden under SUPER_SECRET codename. Normally we would be seeing the real name of the GPU, but AMD is likely trying to avoid generating hype for architecture which is still months away (I heard something about late 2018), hence the secret.
  • AMD’s next-gen GPU has been spotted in Linux drivers
    With AMD’s RX Vega now out and about, it is time to start looking towards the future. We’ve known for some time that Vega will be followed up by ‘Navi’ at some point between 2018 and 2020. Now, we know that progress is being made as AMD’s next-gen GPU has appeared in a new driver.
  • AMD's Next Gen Navi GPU Architecture Found Referenced In Linux Drivers
    This has been a big year for AMD, there is no doubt about that. Having launched a new CPU and GPU architectures (Zen and Vega, respectively), the company thrust itself back into relevancy in the high-end market, whereas previously the top shelf was the exclusive domain of rival Intel. So, what's next? On the GPU side, AMD is expected to roll out its Navi architecture sometime next year, with references to its next generation GPU already showing up in driver code.
  • AMD 7nm “Super Secret” Navi GPU Spotted In Driver, 2H 2018 Launch Expected
    AMD’s upcoming next generation 7nm based graphics architecture code named “Navi” has been spotted in Linux driver code. The all new GPU architecture is officially slated to debut next year, with all whispers indicating a debut in the latter half of the year.

ScummVM 2.0

  • ScummVM 2.0 Released To Relive Some Gaming Classics
    ScummVM 2.0 has been released as a major update to this open-source game engine recreation project. ScummVM has advanced well past just supporting the original LucasArts adventure games and with today's v2.0 rollout supports "23 brand new old games", including many older Sierra adventure titles. Among the games that can now be played atop ScummVM 2.0 are Police Quest 4, Lighthouse, Leisure Suit Larry 6/7, King's Quest VII, Full Pipe, and many other titles.
  • ScummVM 2.0.
    Just in time for the holidays, the final release of ScummVM 2.0 is here! This version adds support for 23 brand new old games, including almost all of the 32-bit Sierra adventures...
  • ScummVM 2.0 released adding support for more classic games
    For those who enjoy the classics, you might want to check out the latest release of ScummVM which adds support for more classic titles. When it comes to the games, they've added support for 23 more titles like King's Quest VII, King's Questions, Leisure Suit Larry 6 (hi-res), Leisure Suit Larry 7, Riven: The Sequel to Myst and more. It's a rather impressive list, but of course the 2.0 release doesn't stop at adding support for more titles.