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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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CentOS LiveCD 5.0 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: CentOS, the popular community Linux distribution based upon Red Hat Enterprise Linux, has been at version 5.0 since April of this year, but joining the CentOS 5.0 fleet today is the LiveCD. The CentOS 5.0 LiveCD is based upon CentOS 5.0

Linux Creator Calls GPLv3 Authors 'Hypocrites' As Open Source Debate Turns Nasty

Filed under
OSS

InformationWeek blog: Linux creator Linus Torvalds said the authors of a new software license expected to be used by thousands of open source programmers are a bunch of hypocrites and likened them to religious fanatics.

Gaming In Ubuntu Feisty Fawn…

Filed under
Gaming

Techy Stuff: A recent article on 10 Advantages of Ubuntu over Vista drew ridicule because “Linux doesn’t support games”. While I knew this was only a half truth, I decided to blog about it myself.

Linux: Merging in 2.6.23

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Following the release of the 2.6.22 kernel, Andrew Morton posted a list of a wide range of patches that are in his -mm kernel, summarizing for each his plans as to whether or not they will be pushed upstream for inclusion in the upcoming 2.6.23 kernel.

Dream Linux - truely a linux dream

Filed under
Linux

There are some minor glitches in the distribution, but overall DreamLinux is a really good distribution. I have burnt 10 CDs to distribute to friends and recommend to to grab your own iso from the site and enjoy linux. Smile

Open source runs alongside Windows in Olympics

ZDNet: The IT systems used to support next year's Olympic Games in Beijing, China, will incorporate open source software, but the dominant platform will be Microsoft Windows, according to IT services vendor Atos Origin.

Mandriva to provide local Linux support

Filed under
MDV

vnunet: Linux vendor Mandriva now has a presence in Britain after the formation of Mandriva UK Limited. The company said it aims to provide local distribution of Mandriva Linux and other open-source applications throughout the UK.

Goodbye Windows, Hello Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: So my windows disks are in Chicago, and will probably arrive later this month. So what do you do? No problem… here pirating is an everyday thing. So instead I loaded Ubuntu (Linux) and voila, go put that in your hat and eat it Bill Gates.

What's coming in Mandriva Linux 2008

Filed under
MDV

wiki.mandriva.com: Mandriva Linux 2008 is coming this September. Once again, Mandriva Linux 2008 will come with the latest release of GNOME, 2.19. The latest stable KDE 3 release will be included, 3.5.7. KDE 4 will be available as an experimental preview.

OpenMoko Neo1973 - an open source Linux based iPhone killer in the making ?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

All About Linux: OpenMoko is a GNU/Linux based open software development platform. What this means for the lay person is that using OpenMoko software development kit, phone manufacturers will be able to bring out mobile phones which have more or less the same features of the now widely known iPhone from Apple and much more - all this under an Open license powered by GNU.

Using Compiz, Beryl, And Metisse On A Mandriva 2007 Spring Desktop

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can use Compiz, Beryl, and Metisse on a Mandriva 2007 Spring (Mandriva 2007.1) desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card). With Compiz, Beryl, and Metisse, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube (although the desktop cube is not available on Metisse).

Venerable Slackware 12 gets a sporty new wardrobe

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

linux.com: Slackware Linux is the oldest surviving Linux distribution, and still one of the most popular. Last week's release of version 12.0 is a milestone for the Slackware team, as it marks Slackware's first use of a default 2.6.x kernel. Other new components include KDE 3.5.7, Xfce 4.4.1, Xorg 7.2.0, and GCC 4.1.2. Slackware is now nearing the bleeding edge without sacrificing stability, making this truly an exciting release.

What is your file system like?

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: In my previous posting "Linux VS Windows usability" I rambled on about the two operating systems and at how similar they really are. I also alluded that while the interface is similar it is what is underneath in the basic design that really makes the difference. I want to expand on that.

Open Source Community Honors Its Best and Brightest

Filed under
OSS

CNNMoney: SourceForge, Inc. today announced the finalists of its second annual SourceForge.net Community Choice Awards. The awards recognize open source projects which not only have the most supportive community following, but also those which the SourceForge.net community's members believe are built with the highest quality, productivity and ingenuity.

Staffing for Linux, not distribution X

Filed under
Linux

Paul Murphy: Today, for example, the people you hired because they knew Debian Linux might be wrestling with Ubantu - and the SuSe 10 experts you brought in last year will probably be transitioning to some other distribution by this time next year.

Asia stays practical about open source

Filed under
OSS

ZDNet: Companies in the Asia-Pacific region are warming up to open source software for practical rather than religious reasons. According to a recent IDC study, businesses in Australia, China, India and Korea reported that 25 percent to 70 percent of their software assets are based on open source.

Mozilla Delays Firefox 3.0 Beta

Filed under
Moz/FF

PCWorld: Firefox 3.0's first beta has been delayed at least six weeks, Mozilla Corp. engineers said Sunday, and it now won't appear until the middle of September.

In the trenches with...Brad Nicholes of Novell

Filed under
Interviews

Matt Asay: I honestly could count the number of employees on one hand that had any understanding and experience of open source. Brad Nicholes was one of them. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Brad. He was the voice of experience on Novell's Open Source Review Board. Some of the insight below is among the best we've had on The Open Road.

Red Hat High 2007: Getting Started

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Mag: Today, Sunday, is the first day of Red Hat High, and I’m expecting 47 kids. It’s 4:00 in the afternoon, and orientation starts at 4:30. Of those 47 kids, how many have arrived so far? Three.

Linux: Keyboard Blink Driver

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In the ongoing effort to reduce the power consumption of the linux kernel and take better advantage of the tickless kernel patch, Stephen Hemminger posted a patch to make it possible to unload the keyboard blink driver.

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GNOME Recipes and Outreachy

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    Since I’ve last written about recipes, we’ve started to figure out what we can achieve in time for GNOME 3.24, with an eye towards delivering a useful application. The result is this plan, which should be doable.
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Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. (Read the rest)

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora