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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Whats new with Fedora Badges Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 7:15am
Story Poettering Fallout, GamingOnLinux Shake-up, and Replacing Xfce Rianne Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 7:06am
Story Open source has already won in the Information age Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:51am
Story Google Announces 2014-2015 Dates for Student Centered Open Source Code Programs Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:50am
Story Mark Shuttleworth, The State and Ubuntu 2.0 Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:47am
Story The future of Linux looks very, very thin Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:45am
Story SUSE, MariaDB and IBM team up to tame Big Data Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:40am
Story Linux Foundation certifications are taking off Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:38am
Story Gaming On Linux Loses Editor, Plagiarist to Blame. Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 10:44pm
Story KDE’s Plasma used in Hobbit movies [Video] Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 9:14pm

And then there are some days that suck

Filed under
Linux

newlinuxuser.com: You get an error message upon booting up. Something like kernel panic. Your friend has the webcam oh Yahoo! Messenger and you couldn’t view it. The cd you got from a friend could not be mounted...

Is Microsoft trying to kill Apache?

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When the story about Microsoft shelling out $100,000 to Apache for ASF sponsorship broke across my radar it rather tickled my funny bone and my curiosity. When ASF Chairman Jim Jagielski declared that “Microsoft’s sponsorship makes it clear that Microsoft “gets it” regarding the ASF” I had a fit of the giggles—and then, like many others, I started to ponder on the reasons why and what it actually meant.

Three things the Linux desktops needs to do to beat Windows

Filed under
Linux

sjvn: "What does Linux need to do to compete more successfully on the desktop?" We came up with several pain points, but some of them are clearly hurting Linux more than the others.

Amarok 2: a first look

Filed under
Software

celettu.wordpress: With all the hoopla that has been surrounding KDE 4, I’d almost forget there’s another major piece of software working on a milestone release. Maybe not as major as KDE, but Amarok is arguably the best and most popular media player on the linux desktop. Amarok 2 is shaping up to be as radically different from Amarok 1.4 and that’s a very good thing indeed.

Linux Users on NBC's Olympics Videos: We Don't Get No Respect

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Where is Rodney Dangerfield when we need him? There are some heated messages flying around in the Ubuntu forums because NBC has announced that it will offer its online video coverage of the Beijing Olympics to Internet Explorer and Firefox users on the Mac and Windows, but not to Linux browser users.

Linspire is going away

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Linspire, the distribution originally launched as Lindows, is no more, says Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos.

Kernel Log: Btrfs 0.16 released, new stable kernels released, Wifi drivers for 2.6.27 merged

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The developers of Btrfs have released version 0.16 of the still experimental file system. new features include Access Control Lists, support for which is needed by SE Linux, and orphan inode protection to stop losing files after a crash. Alongside these new features are improvements in the scalability and performance of the new file system.

Linux patent pool to push for 'defensive publication'

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com (IDG): A tech vendor-backed company that buys up patents in an effort to protect the Linux community from intellectual property litigation will soon launch a Web site to help inventors file defensive publications -- documents that make details of an invention public, preventing others from later making patent claims on it.

Ubuntu after One Week

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.markwill.com: In my quest to run exclusively Ubuntu Linux (a free alternative to Microsoft Windows) at home for one month, I have completed the first week.

Memopal Recruits 100 Linux Beta Testers

Filed under
Linux

marketwatch.com (PR): Memopal http://www.memopal.com continuous, automatic, and long-term online backup. Memopal is looking for 100 beta testers around the world to form a Linux community that will help it develop the first low-cost online backup system for Linux.

How I Helped Build Refurbished Linux PCs at LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: Building and using Linux-based PCs is a rewarding and fullfilling pastime for open source enthusiasts, but spreading the gospel to the masses can be even more satisfying.

3 Linux Apps That Make Me Hate Windows

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: I'm a Windows user, and it's served me well. That being said, I play with a lot of Linux distributions and there are some applications that are just so much better than anything Windows can offer that I find myself wondering how long it'll be until I make the switch.

How trustworthy are Linux binaries?

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: How truly trustworthy are binary files on Linux? I only ask this question because of a recent article on Slashdot that brought up an interesting point about binaries distributed on Linux. Not directly of course, but the implications are there.

12 Great Quotes from “The Cathedral and the Bazaar”

Filed under
OSS

junauza.com: The Cathedral and the Bazaar, a famous essay by Eric S. Raymond, has been a great inspiration by many open source software developers. I’m going to share to you a few highly inspiring quotes that I took from The Cathedral and the Bazaar:

Licensing Gives Linux the Edge over Windows in the Virtualization Battle

Filed under
Linux

oreillynet.com/onlamp/blog: There’s been a lot of interesting product wars over the years: WordPerfect vs. Word, 1-2-3 vs. Excel... One of the current product battles taking shape is in server virtualization. And, like many past product confrontations, Microsoft’s Hyper-V is the late-to-the-game underdog.

Linux games - First Person Shooters

Filed under
Gaming

dedoimedo.com: One of the major reasons why most of people still use Windows is the gaming community. It begins with constant hardware upgrades, required to stay apace in the losing game of ever-rising minimum requirements for this or that game. But this does not have to be so.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • KDE 4.1 packages under Mandriva 2008.1 Spring

  • ssh-xfer: Quickly grabbing files over an existing SSH connection
  • How to install and setup Netbook Remix on the Eee PC
  • Tweak Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) for VMware Server
  • Getting the current weather on your Ubuntu desktop
  • Connecting Ubuntu Linux to a networked printer

Thinkfree Office Suite On Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

ma65p.wordpress: I tried out Thinkfree about a year ago and just recently check back and it was a pleasant surprise. The website looks much more professional and the user interface for the online version is total awesome. Best off all, Thinkfree offers an offline version that sync seemlessly with the online storage. I love it.

Installfest: Untangle, Ubuntu Linux Save 750 PCs From Landfills

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: The final numbers are in. During Installfest at this week’s LinuxWorld Expo, Untangle and its partners put Ubuntu Linux on 750 aging PCs that now run like new.

Forgotten PC history: The true origins of the personal computer

computerworld.com: This year marks an almost forgotten 40th anniversary: the conception of the device that ultimately became the PC. And no, it did not happen in California.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.