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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How the New York Times uses open source Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:58pm
Story How OpenPOWER Went From Zero to 80 in Its First Year Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:53pm
Story Manjaro KDE 0.9.0 Pre1 Provides a Gorgeous and Unique KDE Experience – Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:49pm
Story SDN Series Part VI: OpenDaylight, the Most Documented Controller Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:47pm
Story Red Hat: Security Makes Paying for Open Source Software Worth It Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:45pm
Story Should You Use Linux for A Start Up? Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 12:35pm
Story Systemd Will Be Adopted Starting With Linux Mint 18 And LMDE 3 Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 11:58am
Story 50 Open Source Mobile Tools Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 11:50am
Story Fedora Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 11:41am
Story New open source dependency manager on the scene Roy Schestowitz 22/01/2015 - 11:36am

A media player for the times: Songbird

Filed under
Software

mozillalinks.org: After about two years in the works, Pioneers of the Inevitable have released Songbird, a Mozilla-based music player, with which, POTI aims to do for music what Mozilla did with Firefox: provide an open source customizable multiplatform music player.

10 Ways To Trick Out Your Netbook for Free

Filed under
Software

gigaom.com: Netbooks are all the rage at the moment, with Asus predicting that it will sell 5 million of its Asus Eee PC netbooks by the end of this year. In this post, you’ll find 10 ways to pimp out your Windows or Linux netbook, without breaking the hardware resources bank.

Mingle brings group video chat to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The developers at Collabora have extended Jingle—a multimedia chat protocol for XMPP—so that it can support audio and video conversations with more than two participants. Support for this new XMPP extension, which they call Mingle, could eventually land in Empathy, the GNOME instant messaging client.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Yes, Linux can run Crysis!

  • Microsoft Should Worry Less About Live, More About Linux
  • I Want Sandy Back, Says Open Source Project
  • WiMAX deal "clears" Linux for takeoff
  • Yet another reason to use Linux instead of (Windows) Vista
  • From Evolution to Thunderbird (Part II)
  • Tux on a Groom's Cake
  • Q & A: Keith Curtis on Open Source
  • Nokia eyes wider use of Linux software in phones
  • SilverStone Fortress FT01
  • The Linux Newb: The Install
  • Mozilla Developer News Dec 02
  • Gentoo New Mplayer Real Support, dvdnav support
  • OpenOffice's UI will be getting a refurb
  • Reason to stay with Ubuntu 8.04
  • MySQL 5.1 released with crashing bugs
  • 40 Open Source Tools for Protecting Your Privacy
  • Blender Render Grid
  • Trumpet Windows Loudly--- Except When It's Malware Outbreaks
  • Open source phone gains "fat" distro

some howtos & such

Filed under
HowTos
  • The Best Way To View Youtube in Ubuntu

  • OMG! I am running out of memory. What to do?
  • Hidden Linux : Doing the joins
  • Predicting Solaris 10 TCP Sequence Numbers Part 1: Initial Discovery
  • urpmi tricks
  • Keeping an eye on your network with PasTmon
  • Using Linux to Overcome Comcast's Policy of FUD
  • HowTo use Dig to check if a DNS server is using random source ports
  • Gentoo, build it like Lego.
  • Vim as typewriting tutor
  • Different signal handling under FreeBSD and Linux
  • Mandriva : Fixing input drivers issues in Cooker
  • Add right-click virus scanning capability to Nautilus
  • Where is All The Disk Space Going?
  • Dealing with Command Line Options in Python

Open-source developers set out software road map for 2020

Filed under
OSS

linuxworld.com (IDG): A group of open-source software advocates set out a road map for the software industry through 2020 at the Open World Forum conference in Paris on Tuesday.

Various Mandriva Things

Filed under
MDV

Frederik's Blog: Mandriva decided to end the contracts of at least Adam Williamson, Mandriva's community manager and Oden Eriksson, maintainer of the Apache, MySQL, PHP stack and other related packages. This has triggered a haevy reaction from the community now, with a public letter to the CEO being written, an online petition and people deciding not to spend money anymore to Mandriva, but instead spent it on other free software projects.

Konqueror is losing my conquest.

Filed under
KDE

it.toolbox.com/blogs: KDE comes with the everything including the kitchen sink konqueror program which acts as a file manager and browser although the file management part is being slowly replaced by dolphin. This leaves konquerors role to be primarily a web browser.

Silverlight for Linux : Moonlight 1.0 almost complete

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: The beta version of Moonlight 1.0 is now available to download as a Firefox plug-in. The application, is the Linux version of Microsoft's rival to Flash, Silverlight. It makes it possible to play files such as WMV files under Linux.

NVIDIA 180.11 Linux Driver Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: This afternoon, NVIDIA has pushed out another driver. The 180.11 Beta brings in a couple of fixes and improvements.

Open Source iTunes Competitor Songbird Officially Released

Filed under
Software

blog.wired.com: Songbird is like an open source version of iTunes that handles just about everything that program does, while swapping out the iTunes store interface in favor of the world's music blogs.

Hands-on: KDE 4.2 beta 1 brings impressive improvements

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica.com: The first beta release of KDE 4.2, the next major version in the KDE 4 series, was made available for download last week. Thousands of bugs have been fixed since the 4.1 release and many aspects of the environment are starting to feel very smooth and polished.

Whassup with Netbooks?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.zdnet.com: It has suddenly become fashionable to diss the Netbook. Some of the blame goes to Intel, which didn’t understand who its buyers might be.

Excelixis 1.0: A new workbench

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Excelixis is the awkwardly-renamed latest version of what was previously known as Workbench Linux. I liked that distro very much, so I was curious to see what (if any) improvements had been made.

Mozilla slates second Firefox 3.0 auto-update this week

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. said today that it will take another stab this week at convincing users running older versions of its Firefox browser to update to Version 3.0.

OpenSolaris 2008.11 is ready

Filed under
OS

heise-online.co.uk: The OpenSolaris project developers have released the final version 2008.11, four weeks after the release candidate and in line with their six-monthly release cycle. Apart from Firefox 3, Gnome 2.24 and OpenOffice 3, which are mainly intended for desktop use, the operating system also offers a complete web stack.

Three graphical mount managers

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Mounting and unmounting filesystems used to be straightforward in GNU/Linux. However, with the addition of udev and the demand for hotswapping USB devices the process is now more complicated. That is where graphical mount managers such as Forelex Mount Manager, PySDM, and MountManager find their niche.

Fedora Project Taking Ideas For Next Release Name

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Distribution naming schemes are one of the more humorous aspects of the open source community. The Fedora Project is calling for suggestions on what to name Fedora 11.

Debian Project News - December 2nd

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 16th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Topics covered in this issue include: Etch-and-a-half installation images updated, GNU Affero General Public License suitable for Debian main, and Security Teams Meeting in Essen.

You're Never Too Old For Linux

Filed under
Linux

oneclicklinux.com: November 30th was a milestone birthday for me! I hit the big Five-OH! Fifty! This 50th birthday made me realize that you're never too old to learn something new.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.

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