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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME Music 3.11.2 Adds Pep8 Compatibility Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2013 - 8:51am
Story KDE's Painting/Image Program Now Uses OpenGL 3.0 Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2013 - 8:46am
Story Valve and Linux may defeat Microsoft and Sony in console gaming Rianne Schestowitz 30/11/2013 - 8:22am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 11:43pm
Story $499 Gaming Console Based on GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 8:35pm
Story Free Software Foundation encourages shoppers to 'Give Freely' with new Giving Guide Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 5:21pm
Story KDE Developer Missing, Linux Reviews, and Lightweight Distros Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 4:52pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 4:16pm
Story Ubuntu and ASUS start selling affordable notebooks in the US Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 3:17pm
Story Ubuntu = Freedom! Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2013 - 3:10pm

ogg theora videos to avi

Filed under
Howtos

I've been writing a Ruby computer programming textbook (the going is slow). Along with the book will be a series of instructional videos on CD showing video computer screen clips with audio narration.

KDE Commit-Digest for 21st October 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Fortune-teller and Keyboard Layout applets for Plasma, KNewsTicker resurrected for KDE 4.0 as a Plasmoid. Rewrite of <canvas> tag support in KHTML. Various new language syntax highlighting in Kate. Internal database storage work in Digikam.

Where are the American Linux desktop users?

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linux users from around the world are filling out the Linux Foundation's desktop survey. But what John Cherry, the foundation's director of global Linux workgroups, wants to know is, "Where are the responses from the North America?"

Xubuntu 7.10: Solid as usual

Filed under
Ubuntu

distrogue: In Linux-land this week, it was pretty much Ubuntu Gutsy, Ubuntu Gutsy, and Ubuntu 7.10. The new additions, Gobuntu and Fluxbuntu, didn't seem to receive as much attention. As is tradition, neither did Xubuntu. But Xubuntu is still a solid system for people with older hardware.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

Hidden Linux : ISO magic

Filed under
HowTos

tux love (pc world blogs): In Linux, you don't need to burn a CD or DVD image to a disc to take a look at its contents. Since "everything's a file", it's just a matter of mounting it. So do you mount an ISO file?

Getting to know GNOME

Filed under
Software

techrepublic: Linux has come a long way from the early, oft-crashing days. GNOME is now one of the primary desktops for the Linux operating system; not only is it highly customizable, but it is amazingly stable. Jack Wallen explains why Linux -- running GNOME -- is a viable desktop alternative.

AMD 8.42 Driver Brings Fixes, AIGLX!

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Today it's now time where the fglrx driver reaches yet another milestone. Not only does today's release address many of the outstanding bugs for the earlier GPU generations while also introducing a few new features, but it also delivers AIGLX support! Yes, you read that right.

The Absent PCLinuxOS Release Cycle

Filed under
PCLOS

linux-blog.org: During distro comparisons, many call a lack of release cycle for PCLinuxOS one of its negative aspects. In my opinion, this is the most attractive and positive aspects of the small distribution. PCLinuxOS has a unique approach to releases and updates. Allow me a bit of time to show you the method in my madness on this one.

Linux's Colonel Of The Kernel Andrew Morton: 'Fix More Bugs'

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

information week: Andrew Morton, sometimes referred to as the colonel of the kernel, is Linus Torvalds' right hand man when it comes to getting out new kernel releases. In this interview with InformationWeek editor at large, Charles Babcock, he talks about recent kernel development including an assessment of recent patches and tools.

more ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • New Dirs in Gutsy: Documents, Music, Pictures, Blah, Blah

  • Vista vs Ubuntu: this time, it's virtual
  • October 2007 Team Reports
  • Install multimedia codecs in Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon in 2 easy steps
  • Wubi Installer on Ubuntu 7.10 Distro?
  • There goes the neighborhood

OpenSUSE 10.3: Installing And Running VMware Workstation 6.0.x

Filed under
HowTos

linux.wordpress.com: As I had VMware Workstation running on all my previous *SUSE distros, I as well installed the latest available version 6.0.2 on my openSUSE 10.3 desktop. Even though the latest openSUSE 10.3 comes with Virtualbox, problem being with it is that even the latest Virtialbox 1.5.2 doesn’t support running 64-bit guest OS.

Also: Upgrade to java-1_6_0-sun u3 on openSUSE 10.3: fixing alternatives links
And: Surprises in OpenSUSE

Criticism of criticism of Linux

Filed under
Linux

beranger: 3+1 rants = Preston St. Pierre opines on Linux.com that X/OS is an undistinguished Red Hat clone, where "undistinguished" is rather disparaging, à la "why do we need it?" My problem is not "which RHEL 5 clone to use", but rather "why is RHEL 5 so castrated"?

How Is Ubuntu Doing as a Server Platform?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itjungle.com: Canonical jumped into the Unix distribution business in October 2004 and got into Linux server distribution in June 2006. With the launch last week of Ubuntu 7.10 for desktops and servers last week and the upcoming launch in April 2008 of a new Long Term Support variant of Ubuntu, it is reasonable to stop for a second and try to assess how well or poorly Ubuntu is doing on servers.

Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks - Part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

infoworld blogs: There's this video on YouTube. It's all about the new "eye candy" in Windows and Ubuntu. Of course, like most attempts by the Linux community to parrot Windows Vista, the aforementioned "eye candy showdown" misses the forest for the trees.

A tour through Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic: Last week the Ubuntu team released Ubuntu 7.10, codenamed Gutsy Gibbon, in one of the more hyped releases of the past couple of months. Tectonic joined every other Linux fan in the world in downloading a copy on the the day it was released. Then we spent the weekend working it over.

Little Ubuntu chipping away at mighty Microsoft

Filed under
Ubuntu

nzherald.co.nz: If the battle between computer operating systems was won or lost on the basis of which has the cutest name, Ubuntu would surely reign supreme. Ubuntu is a version of Linux, the open-source OS that is chipping away at Microsoft's domination of the software market.

Also: Ubuntu Back on TOP

Free Finance Software for Windows & Linux

Filed under
Software

cybernet: Ever since we wrote about Mint, the free finance management site, we have received a few requests from those looking for good software to manage personal finances. I found exactly what I was looking for: Money Manager Ex. Not only is it free, but it is open source and available for both Windows and Linux!

Opera enters belly of the Valley

Filed under
Software

iTWire: Norway's Opera Software, intends to build on the market niche it has carved for its increasingly popular Web browser by setting up an office in the heart of Silicon Valley. Opera's new Mountain View office puts the company in close proximity to some the most important global Web players, including Google and Yahoo.

Mozilla: an open source success story

Filed under
Moz/FF

Matthew Aslett: Mitchell Baker has posted the details on Mozilla’s financial performance for 2006 and it is more good news. Revenue was up around 26% to $66.8m, while usage is also on the up.

The road to Ubuntu: Backup Hell

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: I've decided to see if Ubuntu can meet my needs, but recreating this backup regime under Gutsy Gibbon is proving quite a challenge. The people behind Handy Backup are working on a Linux version, but until it's available I'll have to come up with something else. I'm not prepared to start using Ubuntu for work until I get a satisfactory backup regime in place.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.