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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A swan song from this departing open source blogger srlinuxx 28/02/2013 - 4:34am
Story Michael Meeks about LibreOffice 4.0 srlinuxx 28/02/2013 - 4:33am
Story Bodhi Linux "Friends and Family" Edition srlinuxx 28/02/2013 - 4:31am
Story 9 Linux podcasts you should follow srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 10:52pm
Story Fuduntu: An Innovative Old Linux Revisited srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 10:49pm
Story Choosing an open-source CMS, part 3: Why we use WordPress srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 10:48pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 4:51am
Story Two fallacies of choice srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 2:53am
Story OpenMandriva Honing in on Logo srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 2:51am
Story Is it time for Oracle to donate MySQL to Apache? srlinuxx 27/02/2013 - 12:54am

Why Is PCLinuxOS 2007 Better Than Ubuntu ?

Filed under
PCLOS

pkblogs.com: I am one of Linux enthusiast like you people, and have used almost all major Linux distros in past. I am very impressed with PCLOS 2k7, even more than i was with Ubuntu. So here it goes as if why PCLOS 2k7 is better than Ubuntu :

An Exciting (open)SUSE Week

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers: This week was so filled with events and news that it easily qualifies for the most exciting openSUSE week yet: On Monday the rush until feature and version freeze of openSUSE 10.3 started in the evening. The Final Draft of the openSUSE Guiding Principles was posted. The announcements that both Lenovo and Dell will start to pre-load SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and offer support.

Linux: Continuing 2.6.20.y -stable

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Greg KH and Chris Wright have been maintaining a -stable 2.6.x.y patchset for the 2.6.x and 2.6.(x-1) kernels since March of 2005. Thus, with the current stable release being 2.6.22, they maintain -stable patches for 2.6.22 and 2.6.21.

The open-source community's double standard on MySQL

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Deja vu. Remember 2002? That's when Red Hat decided to split its code into Red Hat Advanced Server (now Red Hat Enterprise Linux) and Fedora. Howls of protest and endless hand-wringing ensued: How dare Red Hat not give everything away to freeriders everywhere? Enter 2007.

Linux World - Real World Success Story in the Making

Filed under
Linux

velocitywebdev: I had the opportunity to meet a lot of people at Linux World. One really caught my attention to a lot of problems that our education system faces today. In particular, inner city schools, or schools that are deprived of some of the things middle to upper class schools experience.

Big business on free software

Filed under
OSS

monitor.co.ug: Software costs money. Some people avoid this cost initially by slyly using an unauthorized version, or what is called pirated software. Ugandan businesses don't love Linux. The most efficient way to immediately migrate to Linux is to contact a Linux-friendly company, such as Red Hat or Novell.

Half-Life 2: Deathmatch on Linux

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

kahvipapu.com blogs: The original single player Half-Life 2 runs fine with Wine, even HL2DM runs fine when playing locally. But joining online game always crashed it. Gladly, someone came up with a solution! Wine has lately improved by amazing leaps, even DirectX support is nowadays pretty good.

Vista and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

BlindConfidential: For the past couple of weeks I’ve also been running VMWare and a Ubuntu distribution of the cap Linux operating environments. I’m enjoying being back in a UNIX environment for the first time in many years.

Automaker Peugeot Converts 20,000 Desktops To Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Information Week: Peugeot is planning to give Linux desktops to a wide variety of computer users, including sales force workers and workers on the manufacturing floor.

Running AMD64 Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (7.04) on an Asus P5N32-E SLI

Filed under
Ubuntu

tracylogan.com: One of the primary needs I have when shopping for a new motherboard is, like all right-thinking people, whether it will work well under Linux. Unfortunately, it's also relatively difficult to find out that information -- the manufacturers don't bother, the review sites rarely mention it, and even the Linux hardware sites are skewed by human nature: Most people only post about problems, not successes. Not so with this post!

Mozilla Aims To Warn Users About Dangerous Sites

Filed under
Moz/FF

information week: With the number of malicious Web pages mushrooming over the past several months, the Mozilla Foundation is looking to help users defend themselves. Window Snyder, who is Mozilla's "chief security something-or-other," says the company is taking a two-pronged approach.

Make your windows stay on top, toggle it

Filed under
HowTos

linux by example: Do you wish to have a shortcut way to make your window stay on top and toggle it after without needing it anymore ? Any EWMH compatible Windows Manager(WM) may support it, WM such as GNOME (metacity), fluxbox, xfce, compiz, beryl etc.

How to Convert chm files to HTML or PDF files

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu geek: CHM files, known as Microsoft Compressed HTML Help files, are a common format for eBooks and online documentation. It is a proprietary format for online help files, developed by Microsoft and first released in 1997 as a successor to the Microsoft WinHelp format.

The 'spirit' of open source, now invoked

Filed under
OSS

beranger: Besides the legal aspects of the GPL, some believe there should be a 'spirit' of it too. When I criticized some other projects or companies for not acting in the spirit of the open source, I was ridiculed. Now, this MySQL developer is definitely right.

Slackware Package Management

Filed under
HowTos

tech-articles: Following commands are available in slackware to work with packages.

CompizFusion: ***Updated guide for Ubuntu 7.04***

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: This guide is about as “official” as a 3rd party how-to can get. Amaranth is the Compiz Developer and Maintainer for Ubuntu.

Grandmom’s guide to Linux/Ubuntu: Iso and DAA and Duh, oh my

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: When last we left our intrepid grandmother, she was watching NBC nightly news via MIRO (aka democracy player). So what is next?

Microsoft loses key U.S. OpenXML vote

Filed under
OSS

InfoWorld: Microsoft has lost a key vote in its quest to develop an alternative to the Open Document Format standard, backed by the open-source community.

Also: U.S. org set to vote against Open XML's approval in ISO... this time

Rescued by Linux

Filed under
Linux

richardfcrawley: One of the nice things about Linux is one thing that Microsoft Windows can never be — a tool to rescue an old or ailing computer. After Linux began to be offered on live CD, I started using them to rescue ailing systems. People would ask me to rescue their computers running Windows.

NVIDIA Releases New 3D Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

Linux Electrons: Rendering is the cornerstone of 3D creativity and the most performance-driven task in the production pipeline. NVIDIA Corporation has taken a major step forward demonstrating its next-generation, near-real-time, high-quality rendering product with performance improvements capable of re-lighting 60 frames of a complex scene in 60 seconds.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Atom Installer
    One thing that I miss about using Ubuntu is PPA’s there are lot’s of PPA in Ubuntu and you can hack around and install all types of software which are required for your usage. In the Fedora side of the world there are copr repos but they don’t have as many repos as in Ubuntu and you can’t build non-free software (don’t get me wrong here, I love FREEdom software but couldn’t resist not using some beautiful non-free applications such as Sublime). I am creating a work around for this by using shell scripts which are open source (cc0) but when those scripts are executed they install non-free software on your system.
  • MKVToolNix 9.9.0 MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New GUI Improvements, More
    MKVToolNix developer Moritz Bunkus announced today, February 20, 2017, the release and general availability of MKVToolNix 9.9.0 "Pick Up" for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows. MKVToolNix 9.9.0 represents a month of hard work, during which the developer managed to add a bunch of new and interesting features, fix as many bugs reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.8.0 point release, as well as to improve the build system, especially in regards to the man pages of the software.
  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Get KDE Plasma 5.9.2 and KDE Applications 16.12.2, More
    The developers behind the Chakra GNU/Linux operating system have announced today the immediate availability of all the latest KDE technologies released this month in the stable repositories of the distribution. Yes, we're talking about the KDE Plasma 5.9.2 desktop environment, KDE Applications 16.12.2 software suite, KDE Frameworks 5.31.0, and KDE Development Platform 4.14.29, all of which can be found in your Chakra GNU/Linux's repos if you want to run the newest KDE software.

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • IOTA: IoT revolutionized with a Ledger
    Ever since the introduction of digital money, the world quickly came to realize how dire and expensive the consequences of centralized systems are. Not only are these systems incredibly expensive to maintain, they are also “single points of failures” which expose a large number of users to unexpected service interruptions, fraudulent activities and vulnerabilities that can be exploited by malicious hackers. Thanks to Blockchain, which was first introduced through Bitcoin in 2009, the clear benefits of a decentralized and “trustless” transactional settlement system became apparent. No longer should expensive trusted third parties be used for handling transactions, instead, the flow of money should be handled in a direct, Peer-to-Peer fashion. This concept of a Blockchain (or more broadly, a distributed ledger) has since then become a global phenomenon attracting billions of dollars in investments to further develop the concept.
  • Return Home and Unify: My Case for Unity 8
  • Can netbooks be cool again?
    Earlier this week, my colleague Chaim Gartenberg covered a laptop called the GPD Pocket, which is currently being funded on Indiegogo. As Chaim pointed out, the Pocket’s main advantage is its size — with a 7-inch screen, the thing is really, really small — and its price, a reasonable $399. But he didn’t mention that the Pocket is the resurrection of one of the most compelling, yet fatally flawed, computing trends of the ‘00s: the netbook. So after ten years, are netbooks finally cool again? That might be putting it too strongly, but I’m willing to hope.

Linux Devices

  • Compact, rugged module runs Linux or Android on Apollo Lake
    Ubiqcomm’s 95 x 95mm, Apollo Lake-based “COM-AL6C” COM offers 4K video along with multiple SATA, USB, GbE, and PCIe interfaces, plus -40 to 85°C operation. Ubiqconn Technology Inc. has announced a “COM-AL6C” COM Express Type 6 Compact form factor computer-on-module built around Intel’s Apollo Lake processors and designed to withstand the rigors of both fixed and mobile industrial applications. The module offers a choice among three Intel Apollo Lake processors: the quad-core Atom x5-E3930, quad-core x5-E3940, and dual-core x7-E3950, which are clocked at up to 2.0GHz burst and offer TDPs from 6.5 to 12 Watts.
  • Internet-enable your microcontroller projects for under $6 with ESP8266
    To get started with IoT (the Internet of Things), your device needs, well, an Internet connection. Base Arduino microcontrollers don't have Internet connectivity by default, so you either need to add Ethernet, Wi-Fi shields, or adapters to them, or buy an Arduino that has built-in Internet connectivity. In addition to complexity, both approaches add cost and consume the already-precious Arduino flash RAM for program space, which limits what you can do. Another approach is to use a Raspberry Pi or similar single-board computer that runs a full-blown operating system like Linux. The Raspberry Pi is a solid choice in many IoT use cases, but it is often overkill when all you really want to do is read a sensor and send the reading up to a server in the cloud. Not only does the Raspberry Pi potentially drive up the costs, complexity, and power consumption of your project, but it is running a full operating system that needs to be patched, and it has a much larger attack surface than a simple microcontroller. When it comes to IoT devices and security, simpler is better, so you can spend more time making and less time patching what you already made.
  • Blinkenlights!
  • Blinkenlights, part 2
  • Blinkenlights, part 3
  • [Older] Shmoocon 2017: The Ins And Outs Of Manufacturing And Selling Hardware
    Every day, we see people building things. Sometimes, useful things. Very rarely, this thing becomes a product, but even then we don’t hear much about the ins and outs of manufacturing a bunch of these things or the economics of actually selling them. This past weekend at Shmoocon, [Conor Patrick] gave the crowd the inside scoop on selling a few hundred two factor authentication tokens. What started as a hobby is now a legitimate business, thanks to good engineering and abusing Amazon’s distribution program.
  • 1.8 Billion Mobile Internet Users NEVER use a PC, 200 Million PC Internet Users never use a mobile phone. Understanding the 3.5 Billion Internet Total Audience
    As I am working to finish the 2017 Edition of the TomiAhonen Almanac (last days now) I always get into various updates of numbers, that remind me 'I gotta tell this story'.. For example the internet user numbers. We have the December count by the ITU for year 2016, that says the world has now 3.5 Billion internet users in total (up from 3.2 Billion at the end of year 2015). So its no 'drama' to know what is 'that' number. The number of current internet total users is yes, 3.5 Billion, almost half of the planet's total population (47%).