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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 22-Way AMD/NVIDIA OpenCL Linux Benchmarks To Start Off 2015 Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 2:56pm
Story Collabora Improves Linux Support For Tegra-Based Chromebooks Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 2:51pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 1:32pm
Story 8 great reasons to root your Android phone right now Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 1:12pm
Story Tiny Android Box is Pretty Good for TV, Not So Much for Games Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 1:09pm
Story Samsung to announce more Tizen devices in 2015, post Z1 launch Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 12:14pm
Story Citrix CDFMonitor is Now Open Source Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 12:11pm
Story € 22 885 raised Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 9:25am
Story Chromebooks spank Windows Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 8:52am
Story AntiX MX-14.3 review Roy Schestowitz 17/01/2015 - 8:45am

Why Migration Costs. Smoothing the way for software change.

Filed under
Software

People often find it overwhelming when they start to use a new program like OpenOffice.org, or a new operating system like Linux. The software feels unfamiliar, tools and options aren’t where they are expected, favourite features are missing, and the experience leads to a sense of powerlessness.

Linux Music or The Ubuntu Shuffle

Filed under
Ubuntu

homemadenoize.com: It the spirit of change I decide to give Linux a chance at being my main OS. I have liked the idea of it for a long time. Linux has always struck me as cool and not the kind of hollow coolness those admen think up for Apple commercials.

Photo Management on Linux - Part 2

Filed under
Software

community.zdnet.co.uk: When I am looking for a photo management program, I want one which meets most or all of the following requirements. So, working within these expectations, here are some of the programs that are available on Linux.

Book review: Linux System Programming

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Many people make the mistake of thinking of Linux as just another Unix. Though most system calls are indeed identical, some of them aren’t. Knowing the difference is important. The book Linux System Programming provides complete overview of Linux system calls.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The GNOME Journal

  • Linux Outlaws 65 - Engage Crap Mode
  • My Thanksgiving/Holiday giveaway - Ubuntu
  • 5 things Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex cannot do
  • The Lazy System Administrator’s Way to Virtualize
  • Gentoo love / hate
  • Linux Has to Support Closed-Source Drivers
  • Reducing IT Costs with Linux
  • Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase II: This Time Its Personal
  • A great time to start an open source company
  • Death, Taxes, And Open Source Business Models
  • Linux powers free-to-air (FTA) satellite box
  • Open source within the firewall
  • Desktop Shells, Usability and Trackers. Oh My.
  • The Turkish Pardus Linux Distribution
  • Awesome bubble bobble clone, bubbros
  • hardinfo: A Linux Info and Synthetic Benchmark Collection
  • Free as in Freedom, Not Free as in Freeloader
  • about:mozilla
  • Linux shows staying power on Top500

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • The 10 most useful Linux commands

  • Stop Compiz-Fusion From Loading Automatically
  • Python: Manipulate string or binary bytes with StringIO
  • Guide to Ubuntu Linux for Windows Users
  • Enable Medibuntu in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Less is more in modern X
  • 8 Ways to get help with Ubuntu Linux
  • Interrogating a Linux Machine
  • Cifs problem in Gentoo
  • TiddlyWiki derivatives help you get things done
  • Triple your audio volume in MPlayer
  • Quick And Easy Local Filesystem Troubleshooting For SUSE Linux
  • Testing the Linux Waters - Live CD vs Dual Boot
  • How to hide or protect folders in Ubuntu linux

Workrave: Useful or Useless?

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Workrave is a free and open source software application aimed at computer users who are suffering from occupational diseases such as Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Three applications for making disc labels

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Making labels for DVDs and their cases is an often overlooked task. Many discs are lucky to have some terse information quickly scrawled on them after burning. But there are some fine open source applications available for creating labels for CD-ROM and DVD disks and printing jewel case inserts.

little bit more fedora

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora Screenshots

  • Video: Spotlight on Network Manager
  • Fedora does FIPS
  • Fedora 10 mini-review

The Samsung NC 10 Running Ubuntu Linux 8.10

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tuxvaio.blogspot: This little marvel runs Ubuntu 8.10 in very much the same way as the Aspire One runs on Hardy Heron. A couple of things need tweaking however.

Mozilla eyes extra beta for Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. will probably add a third beta to the development schedule for Firefox 3.1 to get a better handle on remaining bugs and give several new features.

more fedora stuff

Filed under
Linux
  • Fedora 10 Review, and Feature Roundup

  • Rock-solid Fedora 10 brings salvation to Ubuntu weary
  • Red Hat's winning Fedora 10 Linux arrives
  • Security Breach Can't Halt Fedora 10's Debut
  • Fedora 10 Upgrade

Nine awesome computer ads from the 70s and 80s

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: There are lots of vintage ad collections out there, and it’s always a fun to look through them. For your viewing pleasure, we have handpicked nine of the most fun, creative or just plain weird computer ads we have ever seen.

Worsed than damned lies?

Filed under
Linux

frields.org/~paul: A word about statistics: Fedora continues to be completely open and transparent about the ways we gather statistics and the ways we present them. We don’t document these statistics for purposes of competition, but because we believe our community and our sponsors are invested and interested in knowing some of the end results of the work they do in Fedora.

Why there are over 2 dozen music players

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: People often groan when they hear of someone making another game of Tetris, Window Manager, or audio program. After all, people ask, “Do we really need another? Why can’t you just contribute to fixing annoying bug X in gTetris/KDE/xmms?” I’ve always been on the side of the argument that said - “So what! But why create another?

The LXF Test: Hands on with Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

linuxformat.co.uk: Fedora 10 has just been released to the waiting masses. Andy Hudson takes the distro for an early test run, exploring the new features and seeing how it stacks up against the other major players in the Linux league...

Also: Upgrading to the newest Fedora release

More Ubuntu Kung Fu

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: Say hey again to Keir Thomas, author of the new book Ubuntu Kung Fu, who stopped by to share some more of the best material from the book, in a follow-up to his post, Some Productive Ubuntu Kung Fu.

Migrating to Linux in a business or large user environment

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Every once in a while we see discussions on the method and manner of migrating from one Operating System to Linux.

Martin's hidden blog ;-)

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Hopefully Martin won't get upset because of this post, but reading Changelogs is sometimes funnier, bolder and more informative than reading a blog!

No accounting software for Linux?

Filed under
OSS

zdnet.com/Murphy: There is no OSS accounting… solutions worth a hoot. This is the main reason we still run so many Windows machines in the office. Of course this is the main drawback of any OSS adoption. There is a serious lack of good applications.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Linuxwashing and Research Openwashing

today's howtos

Why Everyone should know vim

Vim is an improved version of Vi, a known text editor available by default in UNIX distributions. Another alternative for modal editors is Emacs but they’re so different that I kind of feel they serve different purposes. Both are great, regardless. I don’t feel vim is necessarily a geeky kind of taste or not. Vim introduced modal editing to me and that has changed my life, really. If you have ever tried vim, you may have noticed you have to press “I” or “A” (lower case) to start writing (note: I’m aware there are more ways to start editing but the purpose is not to cover Vim’s functionalities.). The fun part starts once you realize you can associate Insert and Append commands to something. And then editing text is like thinking of what you want the computer to show on the computer instead of struggling where you at before writing. The same goes for other commands which are easily converted to mnemonics and this is what helped getting comfortable with Vim. Note that Emacs does not have this kind of keybindings but they do have a Vim-like mode - Evil (Extensive Vi Layer). More often than not, I just need to think of what I want to accomplish and type the first letters. Like Replace, Visual, Delete, and so on. It is a modal editor after all, meaning it has modes for everything. This is also what increases my productivity when writing files. I just think of my intentions and Vim does the things for me. Read more

Graphics: Intel and Mesa 18.1 RC1 Released

  • Intel 2018Q1 Graphics Stack Recipe
    Last week Intel's Open-Source Technology Center released their latest quarterly "graphics stack recipe" for the Linux desktop. The Intel Graphics Stack Recipe is the company's recommended configuration for an optimal and supported open-source graphics driver experience for their Intel HD/UHD/Iris Graphics found on Intel processors.
  • Mesa 18.1-RC1 Released With The Latest Open-Source 3D Driver Features
    Seemingly flying under our radar is that Mesa 18.1 has already been branched and the first release candidate issued. While the Mesa website hasn't yet been updated for the 18.1 details, Dylan Baker appears to be the release manager for the 18.1 series -- the second quarter of 2018 release stream.