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About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Foundation: Will it be your friend or foe? srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 6:55pm
Story Where native Linux app development stands srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 6:52pm
Story Is Unity Tearing Ubuntu Apart? srlinuxx 1 04/11/2011 - 1:42pm
Story Wolvix: Leader of the Pack srlinuxx 5 04/11/2011 - 11:03am
Blog entry Apache Software Foundation incubating xanthon 04/11/2011 - 10:32am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 7:05am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 6:56am
Story Four Hidden Tools in Scribus srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 5:09am
Story Questions remain over $25 Raspberry Pi srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 4:59am
Story NYSE switches to open source srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 4:51am

Dell's March to Linux PCs Won't Be A Walk In the Park

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In pre-installing Linux on consumer PCs, Dell's biggest challenge will be in finding a full set of open-source drivers for the hardware that will run with the new machines, the software architect on the project said Friday.

HP clarifies warranty under Linux

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We received the following today by email from Hewlett Packard, which clarifies their warranty policy for customers running Linux on HP hardware, at least in the specific case we reported on recently.

Per the HP spokesperson:

HP is committed to supporting its customers and backs its PCs with a solid hardware warranty regardless of the operating system.

Kword: New feature; time to completion; 18 months

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In KWord we always had a very simple way to structure pages. We just stored the height of a page and when there is a frame at position 10000 you can calculate its at, say, page 12. Naturally, this only gets you so far and we had requests for things like differently sized pages and pagespreads.

GPL sparks openness debate in tech sector

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A divisive philosophical battle in an arcane corner of the software business could lead to some unexpected consequences for consumer electronics makers and other technology companies, according to industry lawyers and analysts.

Red Hat Reaches Adulthood

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Linux is all grown up these days.

Once, it was the Little Penguin That Could, mostly a hobby platform for system administrators to play around with on the side, or powering workstations rather than servers. Real business happened on proper Unix systems from Hewlett-Packard, or Sun, or IBM, if not on the mainframe.

Firefox tip - use a master password

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Firefox is probably the single free software project that is used by the most people and it’s a browser I personally love. Today I’m going to look at the issue of how to use a master password to protect your saved passwords.

Portrait: GNOME Foundation's Dave Neary

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Many free software advocates make a name for themselves by being involved with a single project. Dave Neary casts a wider net. He is a GNOME Foundation member, community manager of the OpenWengo project, and a former contributor to the GIMP project.

Novell dissolves its Linux Impact Team

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Novell this week dissolved its Linux Impact Team (LIT), headed by Nancy Faigen, and rolled the members of LIT into the regional sales teams. While disruptive to the individuals involved (and the LIT had some of Novell's very best employees - John Vigeant before he went to XenSource, Seth Shaw (not sure where he landed), Walter Knapp, etc.), I think this is a good move for Novell.

Tux Droid... cool toy, or Tuxploitation?

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A Belgian firm is shipping a wireless robot shaped like Tux, the Linux mascot. The KYSOH (Keep Your Sense of Humor) "Tux Droid" itself does not run Linux, however, leading some early observers to question whether the gadget exploits the Tux form factor unfairly.

Google starts running Dell Linux Desktop ads

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On March 28, Dell quietly announced that it would start offering a variety of laptops and desktops with pre-installed Linux. Now, Dell has started advertising its Linux desktops on Google ads.

While working on my personal blog site, which happens to have Google Adsense ads running on it, I was surprised to find Google ads for Linux-powered Dell desktops showing up. Here's what I saw:

Vector Programming with GCC

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The original intention of C was to provide a portable substitute for assembly language for implementing UNIX. C semantics are very similar to those of the PDP-11; for example, C includes shift operations but not rotation, because the PDP-11 didn’t have a rotate instruction. C did register naming for you, but everything else was designed to be trivial to map to an assembly language.

Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop

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This short guide describes how you can configure your GNOME desktop to display various icons such as My Computer, Network Servers, Trash, etc. on the desktop. By default, these items are placed on one of the panels (Trash) or hidden in the Places menu.

Do You Have Questions You'd Like to Ask FSF About GPLv3?

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Well, we've had some time to think about the new draft of GPLv3, and many of us have some questions. There is a new GPLv3 draft 3 FAQ that answers some questions that have already come up, like what do the brackets mean in the draft (that they are possible inclusions, but not certain - more on that in a minute).

Changing the Console resolution

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If you run Ubuntu on a laptop or other LCD monitor, ever wanted to get the console font perfect?

Heres how.

enter the console or open a terminal window and enter;

sudo nano /boot/grub/menu.lst

Now in there should be a line, # defoptions=quiet splash

add one of the corresponded lines appropriate for the resolution you prefer or require.

San Francisco Turns To Open Source For Mapping Urban Forest

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How can open source software be harnessed to help solve environmental issues? The City of San Francisco is now starting to find that out, by turning to MapGuide Open Source software for use in its "urban forest" initiative.

Process XML using XQuery

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Learn to search your data easier and more naturally with XQuery 1.0.

Gnumeric vs. Calc

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In my previous post Calc prevailed against KSpread, but now it's faces a new challenger. Will Gnumeric have what it takes to win the crown? Gnumeric is a Free, open source spreadsheet from the GNOME project.

I tested with Gnumeric version 1.7.0 in Kubuntu Edgy and 1.7.8 in Kubuntu Feisty. For Calc I used version 2.0.4.

Format Compatibility

Has open source gone too far?

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I come in for criticism here when I write about the open source concept being extended into areas like politics and journalism.

It doesn't belong there, the critics charge. Where's the license agreement? You're rendering the concept meaningless.

OK, so how about cars? Or music?

Anaconda Improvements In F7T3

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Anaconda, the Red Hat / Fedora installer, has seen a few minor changes with Fedora 7 Test 3. I have provided screenshots of the most evident changes to the end-user, which consists of alterations on the pages for disk, time zone, and the actual install process.

On the way to Beryl-Compiz Merge

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After months of talking (possibly more lines than there are lines of code in both projects) things seems to be on the right track for merged project..

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More in Tux Machines

Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

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