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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Osmo PIM: The Strong, Silent and Incredibly Capable Type srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 5:17pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 6:59am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 6:50am
Story The real reason most source is closed? srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 6:46am
Story Firefox 5: New, but improved? srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 12:54am
Story Open Source Innovation and Commoditization srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 12:51am
Story LibreOffice vs OpenOffice: srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 12:48am
Story 50 Must-Have Open Source Apps for Your Home Office srlinuxx 22/06/2011 - 12:47am
Story John Carmack Closer to Quake 1 srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 10:03pm
Story Linux is speed and power srlinuxx 21/06/2011 - 8:59pm

Open Source Needs More Concerted Efforts

Filed under
OSS

Major corporate houses choose open source partly due to the economic gains and mainly due to the control the open source system gives to their hands.

Linux quicktip - find and replace from the command line using sed

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve ever had to modify files on your Linux system and simply change a word or two, there’s a fast and simple way to do this using sed.

People Behind KDE: Daniel Molkentin

Filed under
KDE

For the next interview in the fortnightly People Behind KDE series we meet a developer who has unfinished business with midges, someone who prefers bullets to stars -- tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Daniel Molkentin.

Also: Amarok Weekly Newsletter - Issue 5

PCLinuxOS Reloaded and Rebranded 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

As some of you know, I own and operate mypclinuxos.com, which is a community projects website for PCLinuxOS. What some of you may not know is that PCLinuxOS held an official contest earlier last summer to select a new logo.

Peek through the Looking Glass with LG3D-LiveCD

Filed under
Linux

Sun's Project Looking Glass is a 3-D desktop environment for Linux, Windows, and Solaris. If you are interested in seeing what it offers but are not ready to install the packages directly on your system, you can still get a feel for the avant-garde interface with the just-released LG3D-LiveCD 3.0.

Interview with Firefox Founder and Creator Blake Ross

Filed under
Interviews

As Opera users we owe a lot of credit to Firefox for successfully bringing more awareness to alternative browsers. We benefited a great deal from it by having less compatibility issues with broken webpages. Hopefully this interview will show the best of what our communities have to offer. I’d like to personally ask to keep the trolling away – let’s set an example here.

Manage Your Personal accounts with Eqonomize

Filed under
HowTos

Eqonomize! is a personal accounting software, with focus on efficiency and ease of use for the small household economy. Eqonomize! provides a complete solution, with bookkeeping by double entry and support for scheduled recurring transactions, security investments, and budgeting.

Working with Partitions in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Each hard disk that you use in a Linux system will have a number of partitions on it (except in the rather rare cases when we write to raw disk devices).

FireFTP ftw!

Filed under
Moz/FF

FireFTP is probably one of the coolest plugins for Firefox I’ve ever seen. I’ve never liked gFTP; I find it slow, clunky and counterintuitive. Since I use Firefox at home and at work, the FireFTP extension is an absolute godsend.

How to internationalize your PHP apps

Filed under
News

Localizing an application can be planned, or it can happen as a rushed afterthought. Discover techniques and tools such as gettext, XML, XSLT, and design patterns that can help when retrofitting localization into a mature product or planning for localization up front.

Linux Standard Base plans cross-format package API

For independent software vendors (ISV), one of the major problems in supporting GNU/Linux is the variety of package management systems. However, if the Free Standards Group has its way, the next version of the Linux Standard Base (LSB) will solve that problem by providing an application programming interface (API) that acts as a bridge between the major package systems and software installers. Ian Murdock, CTO of the Free Standards Group, says the solution could be included in the most widely used distributions by early 2008.

Is HelixPlayer still alive?

Filed under
Software

I wonder what the state of RealPlayer, HelixPlayer in generel, is. As you might now, the HelixPlayer or the RealPlayer in its current version, 1.0.something (or RealPlayer 10.0.x) was released in its first version almost three years (!) ago. As you can see in this list there have been minor updates but none of them is really important.

Installing The Native Linux Flash Player 9 On Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

This article describes how to install the new native Linux Flash Player 9 from Adobe on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft desktop so that it can be used within Firefox. The procedure works for other Ubuntu versions and Debian as well.

Consumer Electronics: Closing In on Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Linux has the remarkable ability to be adapted and scaled to specific purposes. It can run corporate servers, personal computers and even small consumer electronics devices. Open source isn't a CE manufacturer's only choice for a micro OS -- among other options are WinCE and Wind River. Unlike other applications, however, a Linux system demands no royalties.

Easy discussions with Simple Machines Forums

Filed under
Software

Many Web sites host discussion boards to bring together people with common interests, to help diagnose problems, or to gain a following for a project. Popular discussion board software includes phpBB, Invision Power Board, and, on the low end, PunBB. One system that is growing in popularity is Simple Machines Forum (SMF), which offers extended features while keeping to a minimalistic approach.

Mark Shuttleworth: Keeping it FREE

Filed under
Ubuntu

We have to work together to keep free software freely available. It will be a failure if the world moves from paying for shrink-wrapped Windows to paying for shrink-wrapped Linux.

Kernel space: KVM virtualization layer progress

Filed under
Linux

Linux virtualization frenzy has a new challenger: the simplified virtualization technology, KVM, has made it into the standard kernel. Could it be a better approach to using the virtualization features of new Intel and AMD processors?

Fun with free software astronomy

Filed under
Software

Astronomy software comes in many forms—from the details of computer intensive Grid computing of the distribution of stars (okay that’s astrophysics) to rendering the night sky in artistically detailed and sumptuous graphics. Being a devoted backseat observer to the evolution of the Universe in general and GNU/Linux software in specific, I thought it was time to show off what I consider to be the elite of desktop elegance.

Aaron J. Seigo: backward compat is good, bad

Filed under
OSS

i read ian murdock's blog entry on the importance of backwards compatibility i found myself at once agreeing and wincing. backwards compatibility, like most things in life, is neither all good or all bad.

Open Source Viewed as Not Obstructing Government's Activities

Filed under
OSS

Judith M.S., Head of the Indonesian Internet Café or Warnet Association, has said she considered that the government's activities will not be hampered by the utilization of open source software.

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More in Tux Machines

25 things to love about Linux

Today marks 25 years of Linux, the most successful software ever. At LinuxCon this week, Jim Zemlin of the Linux Foundation spoke words of admiration, praise, and excitement from the keynote stage, saying "Linux at 25 is a big thing" and "You can better yourself while bettering others at the same time." To celebrate, we asked our readers what they love about Linux and rounded up 25 of their responses. Dive into the Linux love! Read more

GNU/FSF

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.