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Friday, 25 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Xubuntu 14.04.2 LTS Officially Released with Updated Apps and Bugfixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 11:47am
Story Red Hat bolsters cross-vendor compatibility of ARM datacentre architecture Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 11:44am
Story How To Enable Hibernate In Ubuntu Linux Mohd Sohail 20/02/2015 - 11:04am
Story RAID 5/6 Continues Being Improved For Btrfs With Linux 3.20 Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 10:47am
Story Ubuntu 14.04.2 LTS released Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 10:45am
Story LinHES R8.3 Released Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 10:38am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 1:02am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 1:01am
Story A Quick Look at Eight Recent Linux Kernel Releases Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:56pm
Story X.Org X Server Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:48pm

BadVista: We hardly knew ye

Filed under
Microsoft

fsf.org: "The fact that Microsoft has repeatedly extended XP cutoff deadlines and is releasing a public beta of Windows 7 today is proof of Vista's failure"

ASUS`s Eee Box Brings Atom to the Desktop

Filed under
Hardware

channelinsider.com: Asus offers a desktop PC that is designed for the world of Web 2.0 and green computing for under $320.

Update to openSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE
  • Update to openSUSE 11.1

  • No Paradise
  • Unofficial KDE 3.5 Live CD for openSUSE 11.1
  • Upgrading to OpenSuSE 11.1 Some issues
  • Tips to openSUSE 11.1 the most usable ever

Intel Atom 2GB Memory Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Most netbooks currently on the market offer 512MB or 1GB of system memory and only a single DDR2 SO-DIMM slot. However, with most of the netbooks a 2GB memory module could be easily installed, but what performance benefits does that yield for an Intel Atom powered device?

Linux, PhotoShop, And Disney

Filed under
Software

oneclicklinux.com: I admit that many folks out there really prefer Photoshop over every other graphics app. Eve though the Gimp is as featured packed and as easy to use, folks just prefer Photoshop. Enter Disney.

LEGO logos by and for computer geeks

Filed under
Misc

royal.pingdom.com: Lego started selling their now world-famous bricks 60 years ago, and has a certain inherent geek appeal. This post shows what happens when computer geeks combine their love for Lego with their love for certain popular tech companies and their logos.

Spot-on Unix command-line productivity tips

Filed under
Linux

Using UNIX in a day-to-day office setting doesn't have to be clumsy. The first step toward increasing your office productivity using the UNIX command line is to take a close look at your current day-to-day habits.

20 “Really Cool” Netbook-optimized Linux Wallpapers

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: If you happen to own a netbook, it is best to use medium-sized wallpapers that are optimized for small display. Because of that, I decided to collect and share to you all some really fresh, cool, and cute Linux wallpapers that will surely look good on any netbook monitor.

Where is all the Linux news from CES?

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Last year CES practically seemed like some sort of Linux show. It seemed like every company had their own netbook - based on Linux, of course. This year is not like that.

Boxee: Open Source Connected TV

Filed under
Software

pcworld.com: One of the clear trends at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show is the proliferation of ways to get Internet-based content onto your TV. But I’ve seen only one system that’s free (as in both speech and beer) and doesn’t seem to restrict where you get content: Boxee.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • TrueCrypt 6.1 Install Guide For Fedora 10

  • A gentle introduction to video encoding, part 5: constraints
  • Fixing sound-juicer segmentation faults when clicking "Preferences"
  • Adding fonts to OpenOffice.org on Linux with 'spadmin.bin'
  • openSUSE Network Installation/Upgrade Without CD/DVD
  • Adding more to less
  • Logitech Quickcam Pro 9000 on Gentoo
  • type - Linux command to know how a word will be interpreted
  • Is your firewall IPv6 aware?
  • Funtoo Portage is now Git-Friendly
  • NVIDIA 180.22 Linux Driver Released
  • Open source is liberal? Nah
  • The_Source I interview Elizabeth Garbee from Ohio Linuxfest 2008
  • WiFi digital camera runs Linux
  • Hidden Linux : Bootchart
  • Palm Pre hands-on: video
  • Hardest-to-understand EULA *ever* when you install WoW on GNU/Linux
  • Interview with Ubuntu Developer Jordan Mantha
  • Linux script to collect system statistics and send to your email
  • Grub Password-protection
  • How to overclock Nvidia cards in Ubuntu/Kubuntu 8.10 & 9.04
  • Using Sudo
  • OpenSSL accepts forged certificates

Kubuntu 8.10 vs Mepis 7.9.94 vs Puppy 4.1.2

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.wordpress: How about a smack down between 3 of my favorite distros?

OpenOffice Gripes

Filed under
OOo

workswithu.com: It’s paper-writing time again, which means I’ve spent many long hours lately with OpenOffice Writer (for now, I’m still using version 2.4). Writer is a great application and a useful tool for getting work done. But there are some components that I continue to find endlessly frustrating, namely…

Firefox 3.1 beta 3 code freeze slated for Jan 13 — maybe

Filed under
Moz/FF

Paula Rooney: The code freeze for the third beta of Firefox 3.1 is scheduled for next Tuesday but could slip if Javascript bugs are not resolved soon.

Easy Peasy Eeebuntu Netbooks

Filed under
Linux

Recently I purchased an eeepc 1000H and was quite impressed with the new and different operating system. I hail from a windows only background and anything apart from the Microsoft offerings I have left well alone, until NOW.

ReactOS Attempts to Clone Windows--A Heapin' Helpin' of Chutzpah!

Filed under
OS

ostatic.com/blog: Now here is an open source (or at least partially open source) project that may have a strong chance of drawing legal action from Microsoft: ReactOS.

How to Learn Linux - Part I

Filed under
Linux

lovehateubuntu.blogspot: The first step to learning Linux is actually installing it. There are some pre-requisites to installing it yourself, as there would be with installing any operating system: you need some computer know-how.

The Netbook Experience Is A Little Less Shiny Right Now

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Caitlyn Martin: During the holidays I received some Hanukkah gelt from family specifically earmarked for buying myself a new computer. I ordered the one that seemed to give me the most power for the least money in a very small and lightweight case: a Sylvania g Netbook.

Linux-based HP Mini Mi ships with command line disabled

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: Yesterday, while looking through the Comdex news feeds, I stumbled across a Mini Mi 1000 HP product announcement from HP. What caught my eye on the product page wasn't the description of the GUI, it was what followed on the next line. Preceded by "Please note" in bold, the HP page states "the Linux command line interface is disabled on this edition."

Biting into the Linux Sandwich of 2009

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I wrote last year about how 2008 would be the ‘Year of Non-desktop Linux’. As we embark on 2009, I have a similar view, but in keeping with all of the turkey and ham and leftovers from the holidays and to present a more appetizing analogy, I envision the ‘2009 Linux Sandwich.’

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More in Tux Machines

MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance. In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence. [...] MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different. Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care. Read more

The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more

Success for net neutrality, success for free software

We've had great success with the United States Senate voting in support of net neutrality! Congratulations and thank you to everyone in the US for contacting your congresspeople, and all of you who helped spread the word. However, it's not over yet. Here are more actions you can take if you're in the United States. Now that the (CRA) has passed the Senate, it moves to the House of Representatives. Just as we asked you to call your senators, now it's time to call your House representatives. Find their contact info here and use the script below to ask them to support the reinstatement of net neutrality protections. The timing hasn't been set for future votes and hearings yet, but that's no reason to wait: make sure your representatives know how you feel. Read more Also: GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 18 new GNU releases!

today's leftovers

  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record
    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.
  • Linux Works For You
    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.
  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller
    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.
  •  
  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release
    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.
  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities
    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.
  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center
    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…
  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards
    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports. The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.