Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Book Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 6:07pm
Story In the Android Ecosystem, Fragmentation is Nothing New Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:52pm
Story Panamax Open Source Tool Simplifies Docker Management Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:45pm
Story Linux APIC Code Prepares For A Major Overhaul Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:41pm
Story Fedora Flock 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:33pm
Story KDE Frameworks Sprint - How to Release a Platform Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:29pm
Story Upstream and Downstream: why packaging takes time Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:24pm
Story Everyday I help libraries make the switch to open source Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Story Open Potential Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 3:04pm
Story 9 Signs You Should Use Linux on Your Computer Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 12:45pm

Red Hat Summit sessions preview: Rik van Riel, Fedora 9, and RPM with Spot

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Here’s a little sneak preview of some of the educational sessions at this year’s Summit. And who better to outline their talks than the speakers themselves?

Also: Should Novell Invade Red Hat Summit?

IBM Lotus Symphony turns old OOo code into enterprise Judas goat

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Oracle and now IBM seem to have strange ideas about creating a business around open source software for the enterprise. IBM has taken old OpenOffice.org code under the now-retired Sun Industry Standards Source License and released it as a proprietary closed source freeware office suite.

Why Python is The Best

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: At the Geek Ranch we recently made a decision to implement some software in Python. Or, more accurately, I decided and there was no disagreement. Then Python gets picked as the best scripting language in the LJ Readers' Choice survey. That inspired me to write this article (and get ready for Perl and Ruby fans to start yelling at me).

"Fake" Write Support

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: In a series of seven patches, Arnd Bergmann proposed adding in-memory write support to mounted cramfs file systems. He explained, "the intention is to use it for instance on read-only root file systems like CD-ROM, or on compressed initrd images. In either case, no data is written back to the medium, but remains in the page/inode/dentry cache, like ramfs does."

Introduction to Linux Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: When you think of Linux, you probably think of open source software and security, but not gaming. Most people think if you are into gaming, Windows is your only option. A few years ago this might have been the case but not anymore.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Boost security by stopping these 10 Linux services on your server

  • Save disk space - use compFUSEd to transparently compress filesystems
  • Access your Gentoo calendar
  • Realize the flexibility of OpenSSH
  • How To Create An Ubuntu Repository Mirror on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu Mirror? What if I need it easy?
  • How do I… Set up a printer using the Common UNIX Printing System?
  • Making changes to an OpenOffice.org chart in Draw
  • Webalizer - Apache web server log file analysis Tool
  • Be in sync with your GMail Inbox with CheckGmail

All systems are go for Firefox 3 launch

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: All systems are go for the market launch of Firefox 3 for Windows and Linux but Mozilla plans another minor release candidate for the Mac OSX version due to plug-in problems tntroduced by Apple’s 10.5.3 update.

Also: Mozilla Developers News June 10
And: Firefox 3 new features walkthrough

[ANNOUNCE] linux-staging tree created

Filed under
Linux

Greg KH: Oh great, not yet-another-kernel-tree, just what the world needs... Yes, this is an announcement of a new kernel tree, linux-staging. This one is for code that is good enough to build and run, but not good enough to get merged into the main kernel.org tree just yet.

Banshee 1.0 Released!

Filed under
Software

abock.org: It is my immense pleasure to formally announce the release of Banshee 1.0. After nearly eight months of vigorous, non-stop work, it’s here - and we couldn’t be happier!

Anatomy of Linux journaling file systems

Filed under
Security

In recent history, journaling file systems were viewed as an oddity and thought of primarily in terms of research. But today, a journaling file system (ext3) is the default in Linux®. Discover the ideas behind journaling file systems, and learn how they provide better integrity in the face of a power failure or system crash. Learn about the various journaling file systems in use today, and peek into the next generation of journaling file systems.

Puppy Linux 4.00 is barking up the right tree

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: With the recent release of Puppy Linux 4.00, developer Barry Kauler and his team have provided a lightweight but functional Linux operating system. To help reduce size and include more functionality over the previous binary-package-based Puppy. Puppy has an abundance of applications, with more than enough for an average user.

Compiz Fusion Community News for June 10, 2008: Physics, Docking, Everything!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: It’s another edition of the Compiz Fusion Community News, and I’m here to tell you all about the great new development happening in the Compiz Fusion project since the last time I blogged about it.

X Server 1.4.1 Is Released, No Joke

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Today -- just 212 days after the planned November launch date -- X Server 1.4.1 is finally released! Daniel Stone announced its release this morning on the xorg mailing list. X Server 1.4.1 has had 62 changes to it since the 1.4.1 pre-release, and that release had 46 changes, which brings the change total for this release up to 108.

Opera 9.5 RC - Prepare for launch

Filed under
Software

opera.com: You might have noticed we've focused on stabilizing the Opera 9.5 snapshots lately, waxing the new look and feel of Opera, improving performance, security and most of all fixing a lot of bugs. Almost two years after the release of Opera 9.0, Opera 9.5 is now (almost) ready to be released.

Did Open Source Kill the Dev Tools Market?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: "The tools market is dead. Open source killed it. The only commercial tools that can survive today are the ones that leapfrog open source tools." That's the position that John De Goes, president of N-BRAIN.

SFLC Files Another Round of GPL Violation Lawsuits on Behalf of BusyBox

Filed under
OSS
Legal

softwarefreedom.org: The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) today announced that it has filed two more copyright infringement lawsuits, on behalf of two principal developers of BusyBox, alleging violation of the GNU General Public License (GPL).

Speaking UNIX: It’s all about the inode

Filed under
News

Have you ever wondered what Iused and %Iused mean in UNIX commands like df or what people are talking about when the say inode? UNIX and Linux systems both use inodes, and IBM AIX is no different. Discover what an inode is and why inodes are important to UNIX, the structure of an inode, and commands for working with inodes.

mpd - the Music Player Daemon

Filed under
Software

screenage.de/blog: There are dozens of nice music players around, that’s for sure. You can choose between featur rich killer applications like Rhythmbox or Amarok, use old-school but up to date standards like XMMS or even a console classic like mp3blaster. Imagine a music player daemon, that keeps your music collection and listens for clients telling him, what to play next.

Linux Mint 5.0: Solid, minty

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: LinuxMint has impressed me in the past. It offers a stable base of Ubuntu along with several useful pieces that aren't included for legal reasons and packages it all into a pleasant looking sytem. I expected much of the same with this release.

Also: Linux Mint 5.0 Builds Upon Ubuntu Hardy

Canonical OEM Strategy Deserves Applause

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: According to Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical, the company has been approached “by a number of OEM’s who want to sell netbooks (small, low-cost laptops with an emphasis on the web) based on Ubuntu.” That’s impressive.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Oracle Adds Initial Support for Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS to VirtualBox

Oracle recently updated their VirtualBox open-source and cross-platform virtualization software with initial support for the latest Linux 4.14 LTS kernel series. VirtualBox 5.2.2 is the first maintenance update to the latest VirtualBox 5.2 stable series of the application, and it looks like it can be compiled and used on GNU/Linux distribution running the recently released Linux 4.14 LTS kernel. It also makes it possible to run distros powered by Linux kernel 4.14 inside VirtualBox VMs. Read more

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • How a Linux stronghold turned back to Windows: Key dates in Munich's LiMux project [Ed: This explains the progression of Microsoft's war on GNU/Linux, typically using proxies]
    The project is temporarily put on hold while a study investigates whether it could be derailed by software patents.
  • End of an open source era: Linux pioneer Munich confirms switch to Windows 10 [Ed: Microsoft paid (bribed) all the right people, got a Microsoft fan -- by his own admission -- in power, gifted him for this]
    Mayor Dieter Reiter said there's never been a unified Linux landscape in the city. "We always had mixed systems and what we have here is the possibility of going over to a single system. Having two operating systems is completely uneconomic.
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E38 – Soft Knowledgeable Burn
    This week we refactor a home network, discuss how gaming on Linux has evolved and grown in recent years, bring you a blend of love and go over your feedback.
  • Live ISOs for Slackware-current 20171122
    I have released an update of the ‘liveslak‘ scripts. I needed the tag for a batch of new ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. These are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Wed Nov 22 05:27:06 UTC 2017“) i.e. yesterday and that means, the ISOs are going to boot into the new 4.14.1 kernel.
  • Am I willing to pay the price to support ethical hardware?
    The planned obsolescence is even worse with tablets and smartphones, whose components are all soldered down. The last tablet with a removable battery was the Dell Venue 11 Pro (Haswell version) announced in October 2013, but it was an expensive Windows device that cost as much as a mid-range laptop. The last Android tablet with a removable battery was the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 (GT-N8000 series), released in August 2012. It is still possible to find mid-range smartphones with removable batteries. Last year the only high end phones with removable batteries were the LG G5 and V20, but even LG has given up on the idea of making phones that will last longer than 2 years once the battery starts to degrade after roughly 500 full charge and discharge cycles. Every flagship phone introduced in 2017 now has its battery sealed in the case. According to the gmsarena.com database, the number of new smartphone models with non-replaceable batteries grew from 1.9% in 2011 to 26.7% in 2014, and now to 90.3% in 2017. It is highly likely that not a single model of smartphone introduced next year will have a replaceable battery.

More Coverage of New Lumina Release

  • Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Released
    The TrueOS BSD folks working on their Qt5-powered Lumina Desktop Environment have issued a new feature update of their open-source desktop.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.4.0 Released
    Lumina 1.4.0 carries a number of changes, optimisations, and feature improvements. Lumina is the default desktop of TrueOS, a BSD-based operating system. The desktop itself is lightweight, modular, built using Qt, and uses Fluxbox for window management. Although Lumina is mostly aimed at BSD users it also runs on Linux, including Fedora, Arch and — *mario coin sfx* — Ubuntu.