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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux, a slice of heaven for programmers srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 7:09pm
Story Response to “Why systemd?” srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 7:07pm
Story Discrete Geometry Viewer - Quantum fun srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 7:05pm
Story In-Depth Look at Ubuntu 11.04 srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 5:28pm
Story Attachmate reveals Novell, SUSE, & Linux Plans srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 5:00pm
Story Life in a Linux-less World srlinuxx 1 29/04/2011 - 4:51pm
Story Linux Needs To Change! So They Tell Me srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 4:44pm
Story Firefox 4.0.1 fixes several security issues srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 3:27pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 'Natty Narwhal' Washes Ashore srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 3:22pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 7:24am

Network Interface Configuration Using ifconfig

Filed under
HowTos

You can configure a network interface from the command line using the basic Linux networking utilities. You configure your network client hosts with the command line by using commands to change your current settings or by editing a number of system files. Two commands, ifconfig and route, are used for network configuration. The netstat command displays information about the network connections.

Jono Bacon: Sensationalism takes a choke-hold

Filed under
Web

Oh dear. I used to like reading Groklaw and admired it for its accuracy and straight-down-the-line reporting. Recently though, I have felt it has become too much of a pulpit, and this post is just sensationalist clutching at straws.

Get your ABC's of Linux right

Filed under
Humor

Recently, one of my friends shared with me this rather funny ode to Linux which was passed on to him by a friend of his, which I am in turn sharing with you. So without much ado, here is the rhyming ode to Linux ...

Using multiple network cards in XEN 3.0

Filed under
HowTos

Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.

ET Live CD

Filed under
Gaming

An Enemy Territory live CD has been released recently by [*C]ascii at nixcoders.org. The CD is available in two versions, one including the nvidia, the other one utilizing the ati drivers for optimal support of your graphics card. More Here.

The Linux way to Flickr

Filed under
Software

The Flickr Web portal allows people to publish and share online, grouped and tagged by subject, whole galleries of digital pictures. You can use Flickr with several GNU/Linux-based applications. Developers can also use the API published on the Web site to obtain an API_KEY and build new interfaces to download, upload, or process pictures in Flickr. What might be less known is that Flickr already is another place where GNU/Linux users can meet, as well as a potentially very useful advocacy tool.

Malaysian OSS master plan gets pruned

Filed under
OSS

It was a small change, the deletion of a single sentence from the Open Source Master Plan. But the impact could be major to companies that supply software to the Malaysian Government.

Linux Grabs 75% of All Open Source Investment

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating system is the recipient of 75% of all vendor investment in open source software, according to a new report from the Harvard Business School, which also indicates that vendor support for open source is primarily motivated by boosting their proprietary offerings.

Linux adoption - it's the ecology stupid!

Filed under
Linux

Why should an operating system be important for a mobile phone? It shouldn't, but of course mobile phones are no longer simple voice communicators. The handset manufacturers' need to get different types of products quickly to market makes the flexibility of an operating system platform particularly valuable.

Latest Search for Nina Reiser Unsuccessful

Filed under
Misc

The Contra Costa County sheriff's search and rescue team searched for the body of 31-year-old Nina Reiser in a hilly area near Oakland on Saturday but wasn't able to find her, sheriff's spokesman Jimmy Lee said today.

Ripping Shoutcast Streams to MP3’s in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

There are quite a few tutorials on how to rip Shoutcast internet radio streams into MP3 files for Windows. Most of these make use of Winamp and a plugin called Streamripper. This is fine and dandy, but you are not a Windows user. So here is a way to do just as easily on Linux.

Locking Down Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Security is an important issue in computing. Unfortunately, many computers allow a cracker to gain access to them and retrieve sensitive information, or just make life hard. This article will review the basics in general security and explain how to apply it to two Linux distributions--Ubuntu and Kubuntu.

Maintaining the 2.4 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Willy Tarreau replaced Marcelo Tosatti as the 2.4 stable Linux kernel maintainer in August of 2006. In response to a series of compilation fixes sent to the lkml by Mariusz Kozlowski, Willy suggested that all patches would be postponed until 2.4.34 is released.

Combo TV/PC gadget runs SUSE Linux on P4

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Hong Kong based systems integrator Quataris has updated its all-in-one Pentium 4 based analog TV/PC design. The new Ottimo model, which features an innovative mechanical design, supports processors up to 2.8GHz, comes with 15-, 17-, or 19-inch screens, and is available pre-installed with SUSE Linux.

Firefox and Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF

At the recent Firefox Summit, a group of people led by Chris Aillon (Red Hat), Robert O’Callahan (Novell), and myself met to discuss Firefox on the Linux desktop. Historically, there has been a great deal of tension between mozilla.org and the Linux distros.

Microsoft looking into Windows on OLPC

Filed under
OLPC
Microsoft

Microsoft is looking to have its Windows operating system run on the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) notebook computers, OLPC chairman said at the Netevents conference in Hong Kong on Saturday.

"I've known Bill [Gates] his entire adult life. We talk, we meet one on one, we discuss this project," Negroponte said according to a transcript that was provided to vnunet.com.

New NVIDIA Linux Display Drivers Released

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-9631
Operating Systems: Linux x86, AMD64/EM64T, FreeBSD x86, Solaris x64/x86
Release Date: December 4, 2006

Bastille: rated security with education

Filed under
Software

Bastille is a program for improving system security on Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandriva, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and SUSE. Unlike packet sniffers, anti-virus programs, and the majority of security programs available today, Bastille does not wait to react to possible security breaches, but prevents them by removing system vulnerabilities. With many distributions softening security in their default installations in the name of convenience, this approach is enough by itself to make Bastille an essential program.

Installing Damn Small Linux onto your hard drive

Filed under
HowTos

This is a great way to extend the life of your older computers. In my case, I’ve installed it on a IBM T21 with 256MB of memory and a 30 GB hard drive. This tutorial assumes that the user has some linux and command line experience.

Get Paid to Solve Open Source Problems

Filed under
OSS

Getting help on issues related to open source projects isn't always like walking a straight line. Sure there are bug reports, mailing lists and discussion forums, but the challenge of actually getting specific local issues addressed is not a sure thing. That's the gap that OpenLogic is attempting to fill with its Expert Community program.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.