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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mandriva 2011 RC 1 Released, Almost srlinuxx 2 29/06/2011 - 5:40pm
Story Ten Linux apps that need to raise their game srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 5:12pm
Story Fuduntu 14.10: An interview with Andrew Wyatt 'Fewt' srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 5:10pm
Story My top 5 media players for Ubuntu srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 5:08pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:52am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:43am
Story What's This “…And the Rest” Crap!?! srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:37am
Story Security of GNU/Linux Systems srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:36am
Story Peppermint OS Two review srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:14am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 28: My Five Biggest Ubuntu Linux Complaints srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:11am

Africa: 'Microsoft is Imperialistic' Says Open Source Advocates

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corporation's products have been locked out of the on-going World Social Forum (WSF) in Nairobi Kenya. With over 300 computers provided for participants and the press, organizers of the WSF have preferred to provide open source software products.

Linux takes yet another step forward

Filed under
Linux

How can an operating system, Linux, which just so happens to be a free alternative to their costly #1 competitor, not be widespread and hugely successful? Linux is by far the greatest open source software available to any computer; yet, it struggles for many good reasons.

Adobe Photoshop 7 using Wine on old PIII 600mhz

Filed under
Software

Following on from the last post I`d like to write a little something about my experience of running Photoshop 7 on this machine. Its a subject that I expect a number of people will be interested in.

What is this ss program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

The "ss" program is an acronym for "sockstat" or socket statistics. Don't we geeks love our acronyms Smile. This program was written by Alexey Kuznetsov. But what does it do?

Opera OLPC Edition

Filed under
OLPC
Software

This is a special edition of the Opera desktop version - the Opera OLPC Edition.

Linux: Page Replacement Design

Filed under
Linux

A university student studying operating systems asked about why the Linux kernel uses two chained lists in its LRU (least recently used) page replacement algorithm. Andrea Arcangeli, whose virtual memory subsystem was merged into the 2.4.10 kernel, explained, "back then I designed it with two lru lists because by splitting the active from the inactive cache allows to detect the cache pollution before it starts discarding the working set."

Test of current RealPlayer/HelixPlayer nightly builds

Filed under
Software

After I wondered what the current state of the HelixPlayer/RealPlayer development is I asked the developers. The answer was that there is still no date given, but that I could help them by testing the players in my setup. And since that isn’t difficult at all I downloaded the rpms and gave them a try.

Run new packages on older distros with backports

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Software

If you run a stable system, you don't have to miss out on the latest and greatest releases of your favorite applications -- just use a backport to get a package of a new release that's been "back-ported" to your older distribution.

Ubuntu Quicktip - Converting Mac .dmg images into .iso images

Filed under
HowTos

I recently came across a handy script that allows you to convert a Mac OSX or Apple’s iPod (iPod firmware generated images) to standard .iso files.

GIMP 2.3.14 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Version 2.3.14 is another development snapshot to wet your appetite for the upcoming GIMP 2.4 release. The source code can be downloaded from the usual places.

Jono Bacon: Misinformation: The Enemy Of Community

Filed under
OSS

Building and running communities is hard work. What is seen by some as simply a means of providing enough hands on deck to get things done is actually a much larger and more complex web of relationships, politics, resources and diplomacy.

Linspire's CNR to go multi-Linux, remain free

Filed under
Software

Linspire announced today that it plans to expand its CNR ("Click 'N Run") digital download and software management service to support multiple desktop Linux distributions beyond Linspire and Freespire, initially adding Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu, using both .deb and .rpm packages. And, the standard CNR service will remain free.

Wal Mart endorses Novell, Microsoft deal

Filed under
SUSE

Wal Mart is a huge fan of the Novell-Microsoft collaboration, it said today. It already uses lots of Microsoft products inhouse and had pressed vendors to provide intellectual property assurance for quite a while.

Also: HP doesn't like Linux

Tee for two

Filed under
Software

For all the console warriors out there I am sure you know about shell redirection and piping the output of commands to another command or to a file. Those pipes are not made of glass so if you want to monitor the data as it flows through the pipe you are out of luck. There is a solution.

Why 2007 Won't Be the Year of Linux (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

It used to be that every January, you'd see a number of articles talking about why Linux was destined to take off in the coming year. If I were good at using spreadsheets (I prefer my 'text file / awk / bc' method), I could present you with a graph showing the decline in these public displays of optimism over the years. Now here we are in January of 2007 and a search on Google's news page has not come up with one writer willing to make the claim that 2007 will be the year Linux ``makes it''.

UK ISP devotes profits to foster OSS development

Filed under
OSS

In 2003, Jason Clifford started an Internet service provider (ISP) in Hertfordshire, England, called UK Free Software Network. What sets UKFSN apart from other ISPs is the fact that it gives away its profits to fund students working on free and open source software (FOSS) projects.

Gimmie: A New Panel for Gnome

Filed under
HowTos

Gimmie is an elegant way to think about how you use your desktop computer.Gimmie is a new concept of the panel designed to shift the direction of the desktop beyond the standard WIMP model (Windows, Icons, Menu, Pointer) towards one directly representing the concepts that modern desktop users use every day. It is being considered for inclusion in Gnome 3.0.

Will OLPC change Linux?

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

During a tutorial that Chris Blizzard gave at Linux.conf.au, there were quite a few interesting ideas and concepts raised that presented an interesting blueprint for Linux in the future.

OpenSuse 10.2 Review

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I looked at OpenSuse 10.2 as a Win2k replacement. I’ve been impressed with Suse over the years so I was looking forward to see what Novell brought to the table with 10.2. I am not going to judge a distribution on its setup process (OS installation, mp3 setup, flash setup, adding printer, etc), however I am going to mention some installation pitfalls I ran into during the 10.2 install.

Ubuntu founder doesn't "get" enterprise Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

OK, that's not really true. Mark is a sharp guy, and gets open source as well, indeed, better, than most. But he's completely wrong on his criticism of Red Hat (which Greg of the Fedora Project shoots down). His basic point? Because RHEL is a closed binary, it's proprietary.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box