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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ZBOSS Linux 6.5 Brings ZFS For Storage Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 6:49am
Story SparkyLinux 3.4 LXDE, e17, and Razor-Qt Distros Are Based on Debian Jessie Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 6:31am
Story OpenMandriva Lx 2014 review Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 6:22am
Story Apple Copies Ubuntu, Pimping Scientific, and 500 Steam Games Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 6:05am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 4:11am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 4:08am
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 4:05am
Story FFmpeg 2.2.3 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 3:27am
Story Linux Kernel 3.10.41 LTS Is Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 3:18am
Story RASPBERRY PI IN SCHOOLS Rianne Schestowitz 07/06/2014 - 3:13am

Factors in Making Linux Happen

Filed under
Linux

Blog of helios: In the past 3 years, I have had the opportunity to do hundreds of Linux system installs for new Linux Users.

Utilizing The Deskbar Applet to Make Your Life Easier

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: One of the overlooked feature in Ubuntu Gutsy is the deskbar-applet found on the top panel. Being one of the best desktop search tool around, I am quite surprised that only few are fully utilizing it. The only reason that I can think of is either most people don’t know how to use it, or they don’t realize how powerful it is.

Pendrivelinux - Be cool anywhere you go

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: The word cool takes an ever more significant meaning when you consider a Linux distribution running from a USB drive. Pendrivelinux.com is all about carrying your favorite Linux tools in your pocket and running them on just about any machine.

few shorts:

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu experiments in dynamic world

  • Ubuntu Mobile Screenshot on my Carputer!
  • Anticipating Ubuntu 8.04
  • An Unscientific Poll

Corraling Linux Hard Disk Names

Filed under
Hardware

Carla Schroder: The Linux kernel is a restless beast, and must continally evolve and change. Especially in ways that mystify us poor end lusers. A recent wrinkle, as of kernel version 2.6.20, is changing the /dev names for ATA devices, so that all ATA and SCSI devices are named /dev/sd*. T

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux Installation for Newbies (ubuntu)

  • How to install KDE 4 on PclinuxOS
  • Getting Flashplayer for Opera 9.5 with Debian Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • VMware Workstation 6.5 beta 1 with Unity support

  • Nokia N-Gage is live
  • OOXML: Wasn't There Supposed to be a Final Text Within a Month?
  • It's not about the price. And yes, I need the sources.
  • Horny Hamster
  • kmemcheck Aiming For Mainline Inclusion
  • Will Linux Dominate or Die?
  • Towards more progressive open source
  • The best Linux distro for a new breed of PCs
  • Linux.com Weekly Wire meets Mark Shuttleworth at OSBC (video)
  • People of openSUSE: Jakub Steiner

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Further Dissection Of Paging And Swapping On Linux And Unix

  • Language translation from the command line or clipboard
  • Updating all urpmi’s on mandriva 2008
  • Basics of iptables
  • Kicker’s hidden tweaks
  • Reinstalling GRUB on Ubuntu
  • Howto Turn Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) into Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu - Suffering Sclerosis

Filed under
Ubuntu

msevior.livejournal: Well I guess it is almost inevitable. After a few years as being first on ball and dynamic as anything, it appears Ubuntu is suffering the Sclerosis its supporters have accused other distros of having.

Fly the Linux Skies

Filed under
Linux

linuxtoday.com: Altimeters... lie. Yet for over a hundred years, these instruments were more than enough to get most aircraft safely from place to place. This sudden fixation on flying technicalities was actually prompted by the story yesterday about W3Counter.com's revelation that the Linux desktop has broken the two-percent mark in total deployment.

Over 40 Proven Ways to Get Far More Out of Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

ostatic.com: Did you know that according to a recent Forrester report, Mozilla's open source Firefox browser now reaches 18 percent of corporate desktops? That's healthy news for the Internet browser market, where competition is needed. I'm a big believer that you can get much more out of it if you investigate the excellent extensions and enhancements available for it.

Low-cost laptop wars: Vista, XP or Linux?

Filed under
OS

pcadvisor.co.uk: As the release of low-cost laptops based on Intel's upcoming Atom processor draws near, Microsoft is getting boxed into a corner. Microsoft plans to stop selling most Windows XP licences after 30 June, yet most of these low-cost laptops won't be powerful enough to run Vista when they arrive later this year. That leaves Microsoft executives with a choice: do they extend the availability of Windows XP for low-cost laptops, or possibly concede this nascent market to Linux?

LinPC: PCLinuxOS Preinstalled Systems

Filed under
PCLOS
Hardware

linpc.us: LinPC is proud to bring you PCLinuxOS systems! Our systems come standard with an AMD Athlon 4200+ dual-core cpu and 1GB DDR2 memory. We also use a Full tower case with a 430 watt power supply.

Ubuntu a generic distro

Filed under
Ubuntu

thelinuxblog.com: I was checking my daily digg news and i came across Is Ubuntu becoming the generic Linux distro?. Ok now aside from the fact that this guy has had a total of like a year of Linux use and is not very well informed, I agree with his opinion.

Report: Open-Source Features Catch Up

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: Gartner says open-source operating systems—Linux in particular—have caught up to their fee-based counterparts, but a new report predicts costs will rise as well.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Find files on your system using ‘locate’

  • Create a custum conky setup
  • Enabling Temperature Sensors in Ubuntu
  • AutoYaST: NIC Bonding
  • how to stop postgres on ubuntu Linux
  • How to Install Beryl with latest nvidia drivers in Ubuntu

Why I Really Hate Linux: Substitute Applications

Filed under
Software

distrogue.blogspot: On Windows, most people manage their music libraries via iTunes, the nice, user-friendly music manager that everyone knows about. But here on Linux, we're expected to use some program called Amarok that nobody's heard of. And it sucks.

Backed by Intel, Ubuntu, Google, mobile linux is poised for commercial takeoff in 2008

blogs.zdnet.com: Despite earlier efforts from pioneering companies like MontaVista, Lineo and Access, the open source operating system has always taken a back seat to proprietary mobile operating systems. The mood changed in 2007.

Granular distro preview is worth a look

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Granular Linux is a desktop-oriented distribution based on PCLinuxOS. Its primary goals are to be easy to use and user-friendly. With the new preview release of version 1.0, Granular has come a long way toward achieving these goals, and becoming a unique distribution with its own benefits and problems.

Ubuntu is for U

Filed under
Ubuntu

minorityblog.wordpress: Yes, I know… It’s good… why? I tested it for a couple of weeks. I just came from a longer than usual stay in Portugal and since I had no time to compile Gentoo from scratch I gave Ubuntu 7.10 a try. The hype around Ubuntu has in fact its reasons.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.