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Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Novell dissolves its Linux Impact Team

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Novell this week dissolved its Linux Impact Team (LIT), headed by Nancy Faigen, and rolled the members of LIT into the regional sales teams. While disruptive to the individuals involved (and the LIT had some of Novell's very best employees - John Vigeant before he went to XenSource, Seth Shaw (not sure where he landed), Walter Knapp, etc.), I think this is a good move for Novell.

Tux Droid... cool toy, or Tuxploitation?

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A Belgian firm is shipping a wireless robot shaped like Tux, the Linux mascot. The KYSOH (Keep Your Sense of Humor) "Tux Droid" itself does not run Linux, however, leading some early observers to question whether the gadget exploits the Tux form factor unfairly.

Google starts running Dell Linux Desktop ads

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On March 28, Dell quietly announced that it would start offering a variety of laptops and desktops with pre-installed Linux. Now, Dell has started advertising its Linux desktops on Google ads.

While working on my personal blog site, which happens to have Google Adsense ads running on it, I was surprised to find Google ads for Linux-powered Dell desktops showing up. Here's what I saw:

Vector Programming with GCC

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The original intention of C was to provide a portable substitute for assembly language for implementing UNIX. C semantics are very similar to those of the PDP-11; for example, C includes shift operations but not rotation, because the PDP-11 didn’t have a rotate instruction. C did register naming for you, but everything else was designed to be trivial to map to an assembly language.

Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop

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This short guide describes how you can configure your GNOME desktop to display various icons such as My Computer, Network Servers, Trash, etc. on the desktop. By default, these items are placed on one of the panels (Trash) or hidden in the Places menu.

Do You Have Questions You'd Like to Ask FSF About GPLv3?

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Well, we've had some time to think about the new draft of GPLv3, and many of us have some questions. There is a new GPLv3 draft 3 FAQ that answers some questions that have already come up, like what do the brackets mean in the draft (that they are possible inclusions, but not certain - more on that in a minute).

Changing the Console resolution

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If you run Ubuntu on a laptop or other LCD monitor, ever wanted to get the console font perfect?

Heres how.

enter the console or open a terminal window and enter;

sudo nano /boot/grub/menu.lst

Now in there should be a line, # defoptions=quiet splash

add one of the corresponded lines appropriate for the resolution you prefer or require.

San Francisco Turns To Open Source For Mapping Urban Forest

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How can open source software be harnessed to help solve environmental issues? The City of San Francisco is now starting to find that out, by turning to MapGuide Open Source software for use in its "urban forest" initiative.

Process XML using XQuery

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Learn to search your data easier and more naturally with XQuery 1.0.

Gnumeric vs. Calc

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In my previous post Calc prevailed against KSpread, but now it's faces a new challenger. Will Gnumeric have what it takes to win the crown? Gnumeric is a Free, open source spreadsheet from the GNOME project.

I tested with Gnumeric version 1.7.0 in Kubuntu Edgy and 1.7.8 in Kubuntu Feisty. For Calc I used version 2.0.4.

Format Compatibility

Has open source gone too far?

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I come in for criticism here when I write about the open source concept being extended into areas like politics and journalism.

It doesn't belong there, the critics charge. Where's the license agreement? You're rendering the concept meaningless.

OK, so how about cars? Or music?

Anaconda Improvements In F7T3

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Anaconda, the Red Hat / Fedora installer, has seen a few minor changes with Fedora 7 Test 3. I have provided screenshots of the most evident changes to the end-user, which consists of alterations on the pages for disk, time zone, and the actual install process.

On the way to Beryl-Compiz Merge

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After months of talking (possibly more lines than there are lines of code in both projects) things seems to be on the right track for merged project..

Balancing discussion

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Recently the subject of mailing list discussion and offensiveness has erupted in the community. This has been triggered by a joke being sent to a list and the fallout that ensued after it. I am not going to comment on the specifics of that incident, but instead look at what I consider a critical issue here - the balance between political correctness and abusive discussion.

Henry's Tech Advice #6 - Deleting Spaces

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Frustrated writes: Henry. I have a problem with a text file. There are spaces at the beginning of most of the lines and I need to get rid of them. Can you suggest an easy way to do this?

Greetings Frustrated. You have certainly come to the right place, for I am Henry the Adequate, superhero, and my computer guru-ness is second only to that guy who empties the bins at the office.


Get Slack

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Slackware is the most venerable of Linux distributions, loved and trusted by hordes of users, sysadmins and programmers around the world for its solidity and closeness to the ground. Slackware comes from an earlier time when Linux users were almost exclusively hackers who walked the command line without fear or prejudice, scorned the world of point and click, and never went out overdressed.

Speed Up Google Analytics

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This method uses crontab to execute a shell script that downloads an updated urchin.js file every 24 hours and saves it into your local sites directory so that it can be served by your web server instead of the web server.

You are in control with free software, Internet guru says

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Richard Stallman doesn't own an MP3 player. He doesn't own a mobile telephone. In fact, this techno-visionary -- a founder of the Free Software Foundation -- doesn't use any of the usual computer programs many people use.

FSF admits defeat on Apache

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The Free Software Foundation has admitted defeat in its attempts to ensure that the forthcoming GNU GPLv3 is compatible with the Apache and Eclipse licenses, meaning that code from some of the leading free and open source projects can still not be merged.

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More in Tux Machines

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.

ARM/FPGA module runs Linux on Arria 10 SoC

iWave’s rugged, Linux-friendly, 95 x 75mm “Arria 10 SoC Module” expands upon the dual-core, ARM/FPGA SoC from Altera with DDR4 and 24 transceivers. The iWave Systems Arria 10 SoC Module builds upon Intel/Altera’s Arria 10 SX SoC, a faster, newer sibling to the Cyclone V SX, which iWave tapped for its Qseven based iW-RainboW-G17M-Q7 COM and iW-RainboW-G17D development board combo. Both the Cyclone V SoC and Arria 10 SoC combine dual-core Cortex-A9 subsystems with FPGA circuitry, but the Arria 10 boosts the ARM clock speed to 1.5GHz, up from 800MHz, and offers a higher end FPGA. Read more