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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Gentoo 2008.0 beta still in progress

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Gentoo

gentoo.org: The 2008.0 beta is roughly a month behind the original tentative schedule. A number of factors contributed to this, including the migration to new release processes, the usual delays that affect most open-source projects.

Also: Not the Gentoo Weekly Newsletter, Chapter 8

One step forward: a review of GNOME 2.22

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The latest release of the GNOME desktop environment includes a number of significant architectural enhancements and new applications that offer increased power and usability. Released after six months of intensive development, GNOME 2.22 will be included in Ubuntu 8.04 and Fedora 9, which are scheduled for release in April.

Is Ubuntu Really More Secure Than Mac / Vista?

Filed under
Linux

ibeentoubuntu.com: At the Pwn to Own competition, participants were awarded money and prizes for hacking into various operating systems, and Ubuntu came out as the winner over Mac OSX and MS Vista. Ubuntu was left standing, the apparent winner. And the crowd rejoiced. The blogosphere resounded with choruses of how great Ubuntu is. I say it's all BS.

Communicating With the Other Half: NTFS Support in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

linux-mag.com: NTFS support has been slow in coming to Linux. But new drivers are now available that enable you to read from, and even to write to, NTFS partitions, including removable media formatted with NTFS. We show you how.

Understanding the Ubuntu package repositories

Filed under
HowTos

bethesignal.org/blog: During a thread about daylight savings confusion here in Sydney, Martin Barry asked the SLUG list why updates to Ubuntu packages go into a separate “updates” repository. John Ferlito suggested that I blog my answer…

Is OOXML a Done Deal?

Filed under
OSS

internetnews.com: Despite a heated campaign to defeat International Organization for Standardization (ISO) status for Microsoft's Office Open XML (OOXML), over the weekend, even some staunch critics acknowledged that the company has likely garnered enough votes to win. However, that doesn't mean that they've given up the fight.

LiMo Foundation ready with mobile Linux OS

Filed under
Linux

news.com: Google's Android may get all the attention, but there's more than one industry consortium working to unify Linux development for mobile phones. The nonprofit LiMo Foundation plans to announce the launch of LiMo Platform Release 1 at the CTIA show in Las Vegas Monday.

Two out of three ain't bad

Filed under
OS

itwire.com: Of the three notebooks up for grabs in the PWN2OWN competition at CanSecWest, only two were hacked and won. But what does that say about the security of the operating systems they were running?

Full-throttle Productivity and Web-Work With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

anywired.com: If blogs are to be believed, it would seem that every aspect of the web worker’s life revolves around one Apple product or another. For the purpose of structure I’ll break the article into two parts. The first will discuss how Linux can be just as application-rich, in terms of usefulness, as OS X or Windows. In the second half, I’ll cover various productivity-boosting apps.

Secret Maryo Chronicles

Filed under
Gaming

ubuntufs.wordpress: I’ve been following the progress of this game for over four years, but up until now I’ve been a bit reluctant to recommend it to anyone. It was originally too much like the Mario Bros games, support for joysticks/pads and other controllers wasn’t very good and the game itself just didn’t feel playable enough. That’s all about to change though as version 1.5 is on the horizon and shaping up very nicely indeed.

The state of open source: Bruce Perens, Open Source Definition

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Interviews
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Bruce Perens, a longtime leader in the open source movement, is rarely remiss in speaking his mind on open source matters. Here's how Perens breaks down the key opportunities and challenges for open source in the years to come.

When in Rome: engineering the Firefox 3 user experience

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Interviews
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: This past week at the Mozilla headquarters in Mountain View, we talked to user experience design expert Alex Faaborg about the Firefox 3 visual refresh. He shared some insights about the interface design process and talked about some of Mozilla's goals for refining the look and feel of the Firefox user experience.

Also: Granny smithed by Apple

WordPress 2.5 Review

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Reviews

Yesterday the long awaited and somewhat delayed WordPress 2.5 was released. Today, I updated my installation today and though I had a few problems the upgrade to the new version was definitely worth it.

Zenwalk Live 5.0 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: If you're still on the quest of finding the best desktop Linux distribution for your needs, one worthy contender that often goes overlooked is Zenwalk.

Microsoft's new weapon against open source: stupidity

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OSS

opensource.org: An Information Week article published last week appears to position Microsoft as trying to do something right when it comes to open source. And it positions the open source community as being not quite ready to make nice after past insults, threats, and abuse.

Open XML appears to clear ISO standard vote

Filed under
OSS

news.com: Early reports Sunday indicate that Office Open XML (OOXML) appears to have enough votes to be certified an ISO standard. An official tally is not expected until Monday.

Secure doesn’t mean anything

securityblog.org: During my tenure at Gentoo, running the Hardened Gentoo project, the most common question by far was “How do I secure my system?” There are different kinds of security that you might want to implement, and lots of different solutions to attain them.

Ubuntu Linux 8: Is the heron hardier?

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Ubuntu

itwire.com: It wasn’t long ago that Gutsy Gibbon was in the news; Ubuntu’s last release was touted as the easiest and most reliable Linux ever. Yet, some found it pretty gutless, or even just gusty, with hardware compatibility still a major bugbear. Linux 8.04, Hardy Heron, is now on the horizon. Does it look any better?

Asus 4G eeePC Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

1ntr0sp3ct.blogspot: I purchased Asus eeePC because I'm traveling to Europe this summer to do some studies, and didn't want to have to lug around my main laptop which is (in my opinion) too fragile to be carrying in a large backpack without special protection.

2007: Microsoft in Review

Filed under
Microsoft

nazgum.wordpress: It’s no small secret. I hate Microsoft. I think they are the most vile and corrupt corporation in the tech industry. I have read and heard many people claim Microsoft is changing, improving, and the evil Microsoft of the pass is fading; I strongly disagree.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

Red Hat News

OSS: Blockchain, Innersource, SQL and Clang

  • Banks are turning to open source for blockchain, says Google engineer
    Banks have historically developed all software in-house and maintained a fierce secrecy around their code, but more recently they’ve embraced open-source. They’re likely to use open source for one of the most hotly tipped technologies out there – blockchain.
  • Innersource: How to leverage open source in the enterprise
    Companies of varying sizes across many industries are implementing innersource programs to drive greater levels of development collaboration and reuse. They ultimately seek to increase innovation; reduce time to market; grow, retain, and attract talent; and of course, delight their customers. In this article, I'll introduce innersource and some of its key facets and examine some of the problems that it can help solve. I'll also discuss some components of an innersource program, including metrics.
  • Reflection on trip to Kiel
    On Sunday, I flew home from my trip to Kiel, Germany. I was there for the Kieler Open Source und LinuxTage, September 15 and 16. It was a great conference! I wanted to share a few details while they are still fresh in my mind: I gave a plenary keynote presentation about FreeDOS! I'll admit I was a little concerned that people wouldn't find "DOS" an interesting topic in 2017, but everyone was really engaged. I got a lot of questions—so many that we had to wrap up before I could answer all the questions.
  • A quick tour of MySQL 8.0 roles
    This year at the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference in Dublin, I'll be discussing a new feature introduced in MySQL 8.0: roles. This is a new security and administrative feature that allows database administrators to simplify user management and increases the security of multi-user environments. In database administration, users are granted privileges to access schemas, tables, or columns, depending on the business needs. When many different users require authorization for different sets of privileges, administrators have to repeat the process of granting privileges several times. This is both tedious and error-prone. Using roles, administrators can define sets of privileges for a user category, and then the user authorization becomes a single statement operation. Roles have been on the MySQL community's wish list for a long time. I remember several third-party solutions that tried to implement roles as a hack on top of the existing privileges granting system. I created my own solution many years ago when I had to administer a large set of users with different levels of access. Since then, anytime a new project promised to ease the roles problem, I gave it a try. None of them truly delivered a secure solution, until now.
  • MyDiamo Expands Open Source Database Encryption Offerings to Include PostgreSQL
  • Clang-Refactor Tool Lands In Clang Codebase
    The clang-refactor tool is now living within the LLVM Clang SVN/Git codebase.

Games: Ostriv, Back to Bed, EVERSPACE, Hiveswap: Act 1