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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Make Your Linux Desktop More Productive

Filed under
HowTos

lifehacker.com: Apple has convinced millions that they can make the switch from Windows to OS X, but those curious about Linux have to see for themselves if they can work or play on a free desktop. Today we're detailing a Linux desktop that helps you move quickly, work with Windows, and just get things done; read on for a few suggestions on setting it up.

Boxee aims to shake up the home theater

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Boxee is a new entrant into the increasingly crowded open source media center space. The company's eponymous application is billed as a "social media center" -- melding a smorgasbord of social networking services into an XBMC-based media center designed for the couch-centric user.

The 2008 kernel summit

Filed under
Linux

Jonathan Corbet: The agenda for the 2008 kernel summit has been posted. The summit is an annual, invitation-only event which is typically attended by 70-80 developers. It is a rare opportunity to bring part of the kernel community together for focused discussions on topics which affect the kernel as a whole.

Is Linux growing at Windows' or Unix's expense?

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Windows may be king of data centers, but Linux has a foothold in nearly every courtyard and is sure to make further inroads in the year ahead.

Mozilla Colors

Filed under
Moz/FF

bholley.wordpress: I’ve been working on getting Mozilla’s color management backend ready for the prime time. We’re finally turning it on in tonight’s nightly builds, so I thought I’d give a bit of background on the history of color management in Mozilla and on color management in general.

The open source principles of participation

Filed under
OSS

raiden.net: One of the greatest and most destructive beliefs in the open source community is that "Because I'm not a programmer, I can't participate in an open source project." Let me be the first to tell you that if you believe that, you're wrong. Dead wrong.

opensuse adds Installation over serial line

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: It’s now possible to install openSUSE if you only have a serial line (without additional tricks). Our graphical bootloader frontend used to ignore serial input. That’s now (starting with 11.1 beta1) changed.

Protecting your network with Strata Guard Free

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Being connected to the Internet means exposure to what the outside world has to offer -- including the undesirable elements. Every time you connect to the Internet, you're exposed to threats that can compromise your network's security. Although network security solutions have evolved in recent years, so have network attack techniques.

Book Review: "Intellectual Property and Open Source"

Filed under
OSS

arstechnica.com: You'd have to do a lot of man-on-the-street interviews before you'd find someone who could explain the difference between a patent and a trademark. Into this void steps Van Lindberg, a former software engineer and now a lawyer who specializes in the legal issues surrounding the free software community.

Linux Foundation Expands Fellowship Program to Support Kernel Developers

Filed under
Linux

Jim Zemlin: The Linux Foundation, in concert with several well-known industry names (hint: they start with letters like I and G), has hired a key contributor to the Linux kernel development community, the system administrator for kernel.org.

Five signs you're an e-mail addict

Filed under
Misc

itbusiness.ca: Quick: When's the last time you checked your e-mail? If you're like most Americans, the answer is likely within the last 15 minutes -- even if you're not at work.

Asia set to 'give back' to open source

Filed under
OSS

zdnetasia.com: Asia is in the middle of a mass adoption wave of open source technology, and the floodgates of innovation will open following this wave in two to three years, according to open source vendors.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • OpenMoko users open up about their phones

  • The Mini 9 NetBook: Dell’s Hardware as a Service Experiment?
  • The importance of marketing to open-source projects
  • Experts Agree (On Nothing) About Intersection of Cloud And Virtualization
  • Open source after the M&A honeymoon
  • Suse Linux virtualized on Windows--why?
  • Red Hat outlook: Clouds and virtualization everywhere
  • Browser Wars
  • HowTo get Internet Explorer for Mandriva Linux
  • Aspire One: Victorian Education Discriminating Against Linux?
  • Announcing RC1 of openSUSE-Education for 11.0
  • What's 'Commercial Use' With Open Source Derivatives?
  • New Ulteo Application System coming soon
  • Ubuntu gets user interface team
  • Why isn't Ubuntu the number 1 operating system?
  • With EasyGUI, I Can Stick with Python
  • Unlimited Potential in open source software
  • Maximizing Set Match Probability Using Perl

Post-Link Optimization for Linux on POWER

Filed under
Linux

Find out about the recent updates made to the Post-Link Optimization for Linux on POWER, also known as FDPR-Pro. This technology is a performance-tuning utility used to improve the execution time and the real memory utilization of user-level application programs, based on their run-time profiles.

Viewing the Night Sky with Linux Part II: XEphem

Filed under
Software

linuxplanet.com: Part I of this series covered a simple Linux planetarium program, KStars. But there are some questions KStars isn't very good at answering. For viewing closeups of planets, monitoring the motion of the planets, getting precise predictions of events like eclipses, and other such information, you'll do better with a more powerful tool: XEphem.

Red Hat's security issue

Filed under
Linux
Security

blog.perens.com: Last month, Red Hat issued a security bulletin. Not all that went on is clear, but it seems that the servers used to develop and distribute Fedora and Red Hat were accessed by a person with criminal intent. But there are continuing problems with Red Hat's handling of the situation.

Also: Fedora and our security attitude

Mandriva One 2009 - KDE4 - RC1

Filed under
MDV

planetoss.com: Mandriva releases a new version in every six months and this time is no exception. The team released 2009 RC1 which is scheduled for a final release on 9th October. The notable improvements from the previous 2008 Spring release are,

Is PCLinuxOS Stale?

Filed under
PCLOS

kzimm.wordpress: Recently, I’ve been reading posts talking about how PCLinuxOS is “stale”, “going downhill”, or even “dying”. They point out that the “current” version of PCLOS is 2007, has an out-of-date kernel, and won’t recognize the latest hardware.

Gates & Seinfeld’s next commercial: Better. With funny parts.

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: The second Microsoft commercial featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld is out (being broadcast tonight during Big Brother on CBS) and at least this time, there were some funny scenes. And there was clearly a message this time.

SMPlayer: A high quality wrapper

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Loosely speaking, in software terms, a wrapper is something that provides an alternate interface to another object. SMPlayer is an advanced multimedia player wrapped around MPlayer that provides a friendlier and more powerful front end to the underlying application.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.