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Saturday, 25 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Should your firm be FLOSSing?

Filed under
OSS

theglobeandmail.com: The Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) had no problem going against the grain when it decided to forgo the widely used Microsoft Office suite of business applications. Instead, it chose to replace its aging WordPerfect installations with OpenOffice.org - for free.

Valve Looking for Linux Porter

Filed under
Linux

LinuxGames: A reader pointed out this job listing at Valve Software's website. Traditionally, Valve has only released dedicated server ports for their games, and this description is vague enough to where that may still be the case.

UID and GID: the basics of Linux user admin

Filed under
HowTos

iTWire: Whether your Linux box has hundreds of users or just one account for you and one for your dog it is important to understand how Linux user accounts work. There are GUI tools for this within GNOME and KDE but here we lift the lid on the bonnet to show what really makes a user exist, and what these commands are doing to your filesystem.

Battle Over Linux: When a Win May Not be a Win

Filed under
Linux

cioinsight.com: Don't be fooled. The August ruling in Novell's favor doesn't mean SCO's claims to Linux are history quite yet. First of all, it's not a win. Interim rulings by district courts are almost never the last word in lawsuits, especially complex, well-funded intellectual property disputes.

Open Source Internet Utilities - Part 2

Filed under
Software

cybercapital.org: This is the Part 2 of 3 Open Source Internet Freeware list. Hope you’ll find them Useful.

GRUB bootloader - Full tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: One of the most frightening things about Linux is the horrible word bootloader. The primary reason for this is the fact that most new Linux users have only ever used Windows operating systems. In the Windows world, they have never bothered with bootloaders. This article is supposed to provide you with basic understanding of the GRUB bootloader.

The 0.11 Release

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "This version has a lot of corrections, and is stable at least on my machine," noted Linus Torvalds in the 0.11 Linux kernel release announcment, "I /hope/ every known bug is fixed, but no promises (and all unknown bugs are still there, probably with reinforcements ;-)".

Installing Ubuntu From A Windows System With Wubi

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Wubi is an Ubuntu installer for Windows that lets you install and uninstall Ubuntu from a Windows desktop. Wubi adds an entry to the Windows boot menu which allows you to run Linux. Ubuntu is installed within a file in the Windows file system (a loopmounted partition), this file is seen by Ubuntu as a real hard disk. That way the hard drive does not have to be repartitioned before the Ubuntu installation.

Linux's Free System Is Now Easier to Use, But Not for Everyone

Filed under
Ubuntu

Wall Street Journal: I have steered away from recommending Linux, however, I've received a steady stream of emails from readers urging me to take a look at a variant of Linux called Ubuntu, which, these folks claimed, is finally polished enough for a mainstream user to handle.

The real measure of Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: There are so many stories floating around the internet about how Linux is increasing its adoption here or is losing its hold there and every day those ratio's change. There is a much simpler and closer to home method of measuring Linux adoption and you don't even need an internet connection.

PC-BSD Day 8: Demons and Pirates?

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: It may seem like I am only busy with software management in this first week and the impression is correct. The graphical workspace -KDE by default on PC-BSD- is something I will focus on later, but first I wanted to delve into something I had no prior knowledge of.

Three addictive pop-up console utilities

Filed under
Software

linux.com: I do development work, and I require access to a console to run programs, check output, or monitor transmission packets. Up until now, I've used a terminal program in a different desktop, and use the mouse to change to that terminal. Now I've found a quicker way, by using any of three Quake-style consoles that pop up just by pressing a key.

Firefox Gets BitTorrent

Filed under
Moz/FF

internetnews: BitTorrent is one of the most popular mechanisms for peer-to-peer (P2P) file sharing. For the most part BitTorrent client applications have been standalone tools, but now, thanks to open source startup AllPeers, Firefox users can take advantage of BitTorrent inside of their browsers.

Desktop Linux - A Passionate Analysis

Filed under
Linux

linuxevangelist.blogspot: Having read numerous articles about the current Desktop War that is going on; as GNU/Linux enthusiasts, developers and administrators writing mega bytes of articles, blogs and reports on amazing capabilities and caliber of GNU/Linux in Desktop and justify their theories and predictions on it's future, I decided to write my own Blog about what I like in Desktops and my reasons to believe that GNU/Linux satisfies those reasons fairly well though improvements are always there.

Tip: Travel with your Linux Firewall in your pocket

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Tip: Yoggie has developed a small device with a powerful 520 Mhz Intel Processor that fits in your pocket. It looks like a USB Memory Stick but it runs a complete hardened Linux-based Operating System inside. The solution combines a statefull inspection firewall and NAT combined with other security applications like Proxies, Anti-Virus, Spyware- and SPAM Protection.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • i promise i'm not trying to start a flame war

  • Ubuntu Fails to Impress
  • Listadmin: command line mailman moderator queue manipulation
  • Sabayon: miniEditions update and semi-prepared path towards 3.4+ release
  • South Africa's Open Source Software Market
  • Anonymous browsing with JAP
  • Nseer ERP 6.0 isn't fully baked
  • 12 Tips for GNOME Users
  • Running Compiz Fusion on OpenSuse 10.3, its possible!
  • Linux is the road to success
  • Canonical and VMware team on mini-Ubuntu
  • Why David Beckham should not play for Team Open Source
  • Discussion around Upstart’s future
  • Atheros Driver Developments

Price up, specs down for low-cost Linux notebook?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices: As its ship date nears, the price is rising and the specs dropping on Asus's ultra-low-cost, flash-based Linux notebook, according to reports. The EEE PC (3ePC), introduced at Computex, Taipei in June, is now expected to start at about $250, rather than the $190 originally targeted.

Ubuntu Technical Board votes on Compiz for Ubuntu 7.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The Ubuntu Technical Board voted yesterday to ship Ubuntu 7.10 ("Gutsy") with Compiz enabled by default. Although Compiz has been featured in Ubuntu 7.10 Tribe prerelesases, the board has had difficulty determining whether or not it is reliable and functionally complete enough to warrant inclusion in the final release.

Five Easter Eggs for Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor: I have compiled a list of five easter eggs that I came accross over time. Most of them has been around for as long as you can remember but I though it would be fun to compile a list of all the Linux Easter eggs with screen shots.

GTK1.2 doesn’t have to be ugly

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: There are better, more refined GTK1.2 looks around the Internet, but considering my previous attempts (which I refuse to show), this isn’t too bad.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago
    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux
    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!
  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!
    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).

Leftovers: KDE