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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AgiliaLinux 8 GNOME review srlinuxx 08/11/2011 - 2:43am
Story One More Time: Is It Really 'Game Over' for Linux? srlinuxx 5 08/11/2011 - 2:33am
Story Linux: Now 400 Distributions Strong srlinuxx 08/11/2011 - 2:29am
Story Debian Beckons Ubuntu Refugees to Come Home srlinuxx 08/11/2011 - 1:21am
Story Debian Project News - November 4th srlinuxx 08/11/2011 - 1:14am
Story What’s Behind the Recent Spike in Rate of Adoption of GNU/Linux? srlinuxx 1 07/11/2011 - 10:58pm
Story The BIG browser benchmark srlinuxx 1 07/11/2011 - 9:30pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 430 srlinuxx 07/11/2011 - 6:45pm
Story 7 Open and Free Network Servers srlinuxx 07/11/2011 - 6:42pm
Story 10 Linux Distros Every IT Manager Should Know srlinuxx 07/11/2011 - 6:40pm

Inside Firefox 3.0, Alpha 3: Gran Paradiso

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This past Monday, Mozilla unveiled the third alpha of Gran Paradiso, the code name for Firefox 3.0. If development goes according to plan, this will be the first version of Firefox—or of any browser, for that matter—to have the three key components needed to support offline Web applications: DOM Storage; an offline execution model; and synchronization.

Boosting The Internet With BIND

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For the first time in almost three years, the open source BIND Domain Name System (DNS) (define) server, which translates and routes IP addresses into domain names, is getting a key point upgrade.

Ubuntu and Linux-based GIS in Virtual PC

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I posted about HostGIS for Linux server-based GIS the other day... Nice canned distribution, but if you want flexibility or desktop apps, you may want to try some other goodies. I am still working my way up to the whole tilecache/OpenLayers thing... I have my own AJAX WMS client that I wrote, but want to look at doing some interesting things with tile servers and some open-source backend stacks.

Echelon Scrapped After Finding Too Many Examples Of Government Misconduct

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The idea was simple. Develop the world's largest electronic surveillance system to search for suspicious activities by criminals and terrorists. The resulting system, however, worked a little too well -- it kept finding dubious transactions that it traced back to Congress and the White House.

Book Review: Linux System Administration

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If you’re an experienced system administrator looking to acquire Linux skills, or a seasoned Linux user facing a new challenge, Linux System Administration offers practical knowledge for managing a complete range of Linux systems and servers. Calc functions, part 1: Understanding functions

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A function is a pre-defined calculation entered in a cell to help you analyze or manipulate data in a spreadsheet. All you have to do is add the arguments, and the calculation is automatically made for you. Beginners might be content to use Calc for lists, but, for advanced users, functions are the main reason for spreadsheets.

Stranger Than Fiction

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As I prepare for a Sunday's worth of April Fools' stories flooding the tubes of the Internet, it strikes me that some of the things that are going on right now, in reality, would have been considered April Fool's jokes just a few years or even months ago.

Foresight Linux Launches Newsletter

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Foresight Linux is a distribution based on rPath Linux (and its Conary package management), which showcases the latest and greatest from the GNOME project. Today marks the beginning of the new monthly publication recounting the newest developments in all things Foresight.

Some of this month's highlights include:

* Foresight Linux 1.1 Released March 15th
* Latest Package Updates

Dell's March to Linux PCs Won't Be A Walk In the Park

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In pre-installing Linux on consumer PCs, Dell's biggest challenge will be in finding a full set of open-source drivers for the hardware that will run with the new machines, the software architect on the project said Friday.

HP clarifies warranty under Linux

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We received the following today by email from Hewlett Packard, which clarifies their warranty policy for customers running Linux on HP hardware, at least in the specific case we reported on recently.

Per the HP spokesperson:

HP is committed to supporting its customers and backs its PCs with a solid hardware warranty regardless of the operating system.

Kword: New feature; time to completion; 18 months

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In KWord we always had a very simple way to structure pages. We just stored the height of a page and when there is a frame at position 10000 you can calculate its at, say, page 12. Naturally, this only gets you so far and we had requests for things like differently sized pages and pagespreads.

GPL sparks openness debate in tech sector

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A divisive philosophical battle in an arcane corner of the software business could lead to some unexpected consequences for consumer electronics makers and other technology companies, according to industry lawyers and analysts.

Red Hat Reaches Adulthood

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Linux is all grown up these days.

Once, it was the Little Penguin That Could, mostly a hobby platform for system administrators to play around with on the side, or powering workstations rather than servers. Real business happened on proper Unix systems from Hewlett-Packard, or Sun, or IBM, if not on the mainframe.

Firefox tip - use a master password

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Firefox is probably the single free software project that is used by the most people and it’s a browser I personally love. Today I’m going to look at the issue of how to use a master password to protect your saved passwords.

Portrait: GNOME Foundation's Dave Neary

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Many free software advocates make a name for themselves by being involved with a single project. Dave Neary casts a wider net. He is a GNOME Foundation member, community manager of the OpenWengo project, and a former contributor to the GIMP project.

Novell dissolves its Linux Impact Team

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Novell this week dissolved its Linux Impact Team (LIT), headed by Nancy Faigen, and rolled the members of LIT into the regional sales teams. While disruptive to the individuals involved (and the LIT had some of Novell's very best employees - John Vigeant before he went to XenSource, Seth Shaw (not sure where he landed), Walter Knapp, etc.), I think this is a good move for Novell.

Tux Droid... cool toy, or Tuxploitation?

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A Belgian firm is shipping a wireless robot shaped like Tux, the Linux mascot. The KYSOH (Keep Your Sense of Humor) "Tux Droid" itself does not run Linux, however, leading some early observers to question whether the gadget exploits the Tux form factor unfairly.

Google starts running Dell Linux Desktop ads

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On March 28, Dell quietly announced that it would start offering a variety of laptops and desktops with pre-installed Linux. Now, Dell has started advertising its Linux desktops on Google ads.

While working on my personal blog site, which happens to have Google Adsense ads running on it, I was surprised to find Google ads for Linux-powered Dell desktops showing up. Here's what I saw:

Vector Programming with GCC

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The original intention of C was to provide a portable substitute for assembly language for implementing UNIX. C semantics are very similar to those of the PDP-11; for example, C includes shift operations but not rotation, because the PDP-11 didn’t have a rotate instruction. C did register naming for you, but everything else was designed to be trivial to map to an assembly language.

Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop

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This short guide describes how you can configure your GNOME desktop to display various icons such as My Computer, Network Servers, Trash, etc. on the desktop. By default, these items are placed on one of the panels (Trash) or hidden in the Places menu.

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Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • This Is the Final Artwork of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Operating System
    Today, October 25, 2016, Debian Project's Laura Arjona Reina and Niels Thykier proudly announced Juliette Taka Belin as the official artwork winner for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.
  • Rankings, Condorcet and free software: Calculating the results for the Stretch Artwork Survey
    We had 12 candidates for the Debian Stretch Artwork and a survey was set up for allowing people to vote which one they prefer. The survey was run in my LimeSurvey instance, LimeSurvey its a nice free software with a lot of features. It provides a “Ranking” question type, and it was very easy for allowing people to “vote” in the Debian style (Debian uses the Condorcet method in its elections). However, although LimeSurvey offers statistics and even graphics to show the results of many type of questions, its output for the Ranking type is not useful, so I had to export the data and use another tool to find the winner.
  • Reviews: Quirky Zorin and Boring Ubuntu
    Perhaps not so coincidentally, Joshua Allen Holm reached nearly the same conclusion today with Ubuntu 16.10. He began, "At first glance, little has changed in Ubuntu 16.10. It looks almost exactly like every other recent release of Ubuntu." He spent most of his article looking at Unity 8, which is still just a preview, and said it does show promise with its early "polish." Holm concluded there was little reason to recommend an upgrade unless you need a fix provided or wish the newer software. In addition, Chin Wong recently upgraded and came to nearly the same exact conclusions.
  • Canonical explains Ubuntu Advantage benefits -- could your business switch to Linux?
    Linux-based desktop operating systems are better than Windows because they are free, right? Whoa there, folks. Neither are necessarily better or worse -- it really depends on your needs. Cost-free operating systems, such as Ubuntu and Fedora, are definitely great for home consumers looking to breathe new life into old machines. With that said, the benefits of Linux extend beyond money and cost-savings. Linux being free is sort of misleading when it comes to business use too. While a small business with a few employees can get by with free support, larger companies would be crazy to go it entirely alone -- paid support is a necessity for success. Today, Canonical releases a well-designed infographic that explains the benefits of its paid support, called 'Ubuntu Advantage'. "Ubuntu Advantage is the commercial support package from Canonical. It includes Landscape, the Ubuntu systems management tool, and the Canonical Livepatch Service, which enables you to apply kernel fixes without restarting your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS systems", says Canonical.