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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Netrunner Rolling 2014.09 review Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 9:17am
Story What Will Run The Internet of Things? Hint: It's Fully Open Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 9:07am
Story GhostBSD 4.0-RELEASE finally ready Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 9:01am
Story TokuMX 2.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 8:54am
Story 15 years of whois Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 8:38am
Story Actions have consequences (or: why I'm not fixing Intel's bugs any more) Roy Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 8:35am
Story Google reportedly tried to buy Cyanogen Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 8:30am
Story Genoa gradually switching to open source tools Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 2:40am
Story Ubuntu MATE Will Steal the Show of the Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn Launch Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 2:37am
Story Hamburg Greens call for a switch to open source Rianne Schestowitz 03/10/2014 - 2:24am

For The Love Of Unix

Filed under
Linux

pthree.org: “Linux users use Linux because they hate Windows. BSD users use BSD because they love Unix.” I can’t emphasize how true that statement is. I’m subscribe to several mailing lists, I subscribe to hundreds of RSS feeds, I visit forums semi-regularly, I’m on IRC 24/7 in plenty of channels. You want to know what I see?

Where is Linux in the equation?

Filed under
Linux
  • The British Library's online turn-up for the books
    --Where is Linux in the equation?

  • Photos: Rare books resurrected online
  • BL = Betrayed Library

One more reason not to trust CMake

Filed under
Software

blog.flameeyes.eu: So everybody says that CMake is great because it’s faster. Of course CMake achieves speed with an approach different from the one autotools have, that is, they don’t discover features, they apply knowledge. Hey it’s a valid method as any other, if you actually know what you are doing, and if you can keep up with variants and all the rest. Another thing that it does is to avoid the re-linking during the install phase.

Linux preinstalls rocket to three per cent

Filed under
Linux

theinquirer.net: LINUX HAS MADE headway in Microsoft's UK heartland, the PC sales channel. The number of machines shipped with Linux preloaded on them has multiplied a whopping 28 times since Microsoft launched its Vista operating system in January 2007.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • A breath of fresh air for Konsole

  • Kernel log: 2.6.25.13 corrects a vulnerability, problems with ACPI
  • Linux short tip: Extract icons from exe files
  • Install configure & use Opera 9.5 browser in openSUSE
  • IBM Lotus: we're beating Microsoft
  • My Thoughts on Linux
  • Top 10 Command Line Tools
  • Foresight Linux
  • KDE 4.1.0 disappoints
  • StarOffice Part 2
  • Ubuntu Studio Want You
  • CIO Reality Check: Linux and Virtualization
  • FSF demonstrates iPhone's incompatibility with free software and GPLv3
  • Linux Error: curses.h: No such file or directory Problem Solution
  • Mandriva 2009 Beta
  • Don’t Judge an Open Source Project by its Cover
  • Open Source Software Developer Careers
  • openSUSE Hopes to See you in San Francisco
  • Buck DNS Monoculture with BIND Alternatives

Total solar eclipse on August 1, 2008, in Northern Hemisphere

Filed under
Sci/Tech

itwire.com: A total solar eclipse will begin in northern Canada early Friday morning, and sweep through Greenland, the Arctic, Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial solar eclipse will be seen in the northeastern parts of North America, and much of Europe and Asia.

What’s next in Red Hat Enterprise Linux (part 2)

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Here’s the final installment of Bill Nottingham’s series based on the talk he gave at this year’s Red Hat Summit. Find out about the latest and greatest Fedora™ developments… and the future of Red Hat® Enterprise Linux® from this experienced engineer.

Working With Firefox Spell-Checking Tools

Filed under
Moz/FF

bmighty.com/blog: When you work online, words are like clothes: Use them carelessly, and you might as well show up for a business meeting in dirty flip-flops and an "I'm with stupid" T-shirt. Fortunately, Firefox makes it easy to spruce up your online "wardrobe" with all sorts of language-enhancing features.

Is it possible that the Linux Desktop is going to surpass the Mac in use?

Filed under
Linux

scienceblogs.com: We can assume that Shuttleworth is being optimistic and pro-Linux because he is so invested in it. So I won't write off what he has to say, but we will not be surprised at his exuberance. Vaughan-Nichols bothers to make a comparison between the Mac system and the Linux system and bases his conclusion on that. Sorry, Stevo, but that's dumb.

tweetdeck on ubuntu

Filed under
Software

secretengineer.wordpress: I just installed the Twitter client TweetDeck on my Ubuntu laptop (Fiesty Fawn v. 7.04). In the short time I have played with it, it seems to be working as robustly as my window-based app. The Adobe AIR framework is in alpha for Linux and so it is anyone’s guess what ultimately will happen.

New Linux file system in development: Tux3

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: Recently Daniel Phillips announced that he is developing a new file system, Tux3. It plans to be a modern file system on level with ZFS and the currently also still in development Btrfs.

SSD vs. SATA benchmarks, round 2: Server applications

linux.com: Yesterday I presented Bonnie++ and IOzone benchmarks for a solid state drive in a client machine and discussed the relative merits of purchasing an SSD over a set of hard disks costing the same money. Today I'll look at deploying and taking advantage of the extremely fast seek time of the SSD on a server.

Why Virtualization isn't all that.

Filed under
Hardware

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: There are certain situations I can agree virtualization can be useful and efficient. It is a concept called "planned obsolescence" and was generally made notorious by AT&T after Ma Bell broke up. The same technological snakeoil is sold by computer and electronics makers today.

KDE 4.1: Better Than Any Mac Or Vista

Filed under
KDE

efytimes.com: This is going to give a hard time to any Vista or Mac. KDE brings to GNU/Linux the cool and bling factor with a complete arsenal of applications and tools with which you can conquer even Mars.

Will LSB 4 Standardize Linux?

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Not all Linux distributions are made with the same components, which can make it difficult for software developers to write applications for multiple Linux distributions. That's where the Linux Standards Base (LSB) comes into play.

Virtual Linux, coming to a desktop near you

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Virtualisation is on the brink of turning operating systems into a commodity item. It may be realistic to see software applications shipped as virtual computer images in the near future. Linux has much to benefit from this, with a repeat of the phenomenal adoption rate it has enjoyed since the ASUS Eee PC.

OOo Basics: Creating charts with Base and Calc

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

linux.com: While OpenOffice.org Base is good for storing and querying data, it doesn't provide any easy way to chart information. This is exactly what Calc does best, with its dedicated chart module. If you want to visualize data stored in a Base database, you can write an OOo Basic macro that pulls data from a database, inserts it into a Calc spreadsheet, and then creates a chart. Here's how.

Disasters at Whistler raining on Mozilla’s summer parade

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet: A rock slide, power outage and loss of a top engineer of Firefox 3 have some attendees of Mozilla’s 2008 summer summit wondering if the ghosts in Redmond aren’t raining on their parade. The Firefox summit is behing held at, ahem, Whistler, the code name of Microsoft’s Windows XP.

Video: ‘Your Linux is ready’

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Here’s your countdown of Linux hits for the week, plus one Novell-produced video, spoofing the Mac-PC ads. Do you suppose anyone will ever make one of these ads or parodies that doesn’t make the “winner” completely smarmy and annoying?

going wild with kde 4.1 themes

Filed under
KDE

vizzzion.org: Now KDE 4.1 is out, I've played around a bit with different themes. I've installed the KDE artwork package, and a couple of themes via GetHotNewStuff. KDE's coloring system has seen quite a lot of love, as has Plasma's theming engine. The results are quite impressive, as you can see in the screenshots.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds

Arch Linux vs. Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu Benchmarks

Last week when sharing the results of tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 to try to make it run as fast as Clear Linux, it didn't take long for Phoronix readers to share their opinions on Arch Linux and the request for some optimized Arch Linux benchmarks against Clear Linux. Here are some results of that testing so far in carrying out a clean Arch Linux build with some basic optimizations compared to using Antergos Minimal out-of-the-box, Ubuntu Server, and Clear Linux. Tests this time around were done on the Intel Core i9 7980XE system with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 Corsair memory, GeForce GTX 750, and Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe solid-state drive. The system with 18 cores / 36 threads does make for quick and easy compiling of many Linux packages. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.