Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Interview: Prakash Advani srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 2:47pm
Story Puppy Linux founder releases Quirky 1.4 srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 2:45pm
Story today's odds & ends: srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 5:43am
Story today's howtos: srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 5:33am
Story Leslie Nielsen dead at 84 srlinuxx 1 29/11/2010 - 3:59am
Story Squeak, Scratch and Etoys on Ubuntu and Maemo srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 3:35am
Story Librarians, developers push open-source alternative srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 1:36am
Story Evolution of my netbook UI srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 1:35am
Story Hands-on: a first look at Diaspora's private alpha test srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 1:33am
Story It’s Not Easy Being Green srlinuxx 29/11/2010 - 1:31am

Please Submit your Open Source Resume in Word

Filed under
Misc

I had email today from Studio B. Apparently they are looking for technical writers in some specific areas. I'm neither interested nor qualified (and if elected, I will not serve) but I had to raise my eyebrows at this kicker: If this is of interest, please submit your resume, in Microsoft Word format...

A Gentoo diary part 1

Filed under
Gentoo

It's been a while since I promised to write about my Gentoo desktops. In the intro, I gave some general information about Gentoo, and explained my setup. This time I set up an old 300 mHz server with Gentoo, tried to make distributed compiling work, learned a bit more about Windowmaker, tried to get a Broadcom Wireless card working on a laptop, switched to Grub, and finally got rid of Xmms.

Shuttleworth computer labs ransacked

Filed under
Misc

Two of the computer laboratories set up in Cape Town schools by the Shuttleworth Foundation were ransacked during the three-week school holiday which ended on Friday.

Report advocates open-source approach for software acquisition

Filed under
OSS

A recently released Defense Department report on technology development methodologies advocates more use of open-source software and suggests ways it can be incorporated into the procurement cycle. Resuse can save money by promoting reuse of software across the different defense agencies, the report contends.

Realising the true value of Freedom

Filed under
OSS

Many people who use free software including GNU/Linux take it for granted and do not even think twice about supporting the software they enjoy using. But suppose tomorrow, the rule of law passes a decree that using GPLed free software is against the law and prohibits the sharing of free software including GNU/Linux distributions.

Making the message stick

Filed under
OSS

What is a freedom league without a bit of guerrilla branding? In an effort to increase the exposure of its cause, the Geek Freedom League (GFL) is calling on geeks to use GFL-branded stickers in ingenious ways.

UI Improvements in Evolution 2.8

Filed under
Software

Four months, in GNOME 2.16 cycle, We have added a lot of UI improvements to Evolution to make it look much better. Not just features and lot of bug fixes too!!! I have blogged them in parts. Im summarising all of them.

The State of ATI Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Well well, the day has finally come. It is now day number 50; the final day for this ATI Linux trial. With that said, it's about time for me to share some concluding remarks regarding ATI's recent Linux efforts with their monthly fglrx display drivers. On the first day, I didn't know whether I would be able to survive without going green (no pun intended), but towards the end of this experience, it was almost like achieving nirvana.

Create a secure Linux-based wireless access point

Filed under
HowTos

Wi-Fi Protected Access version 2 (WPA2) is becoming the de facto standard for securing wireless networks, and a mandatory feature for all new Wi-Fi products certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance. We all know the security weaknesses of its predecessor, WEP; this time they got it right. Here's how to implement the WPA2 protocol on a Linux host and create a secure wireless access point (WAP) for your network.

Also: WiFi Radar eases connections

Cross-platform cross-environment RPC server creation

Filed under
HowTos

Using XML-RPC it is possible to write software that can be accessed remotely by multiple means, from Ruby and Python to Perl and Ajax. Using a couple of simple libraries it is possible to setup a simple server in only a few minutes, with no need to worry about argument parsing, anything complex.

openSUSE 10.1 package manager fix due this week

Filed under
SUSE

"We love openSUSE, but we hate openSUSE's package management problems," Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, DesktopLinux.com's resident Linux curmudgeon, reports from his vacation. But there's good news: a fix is coming soon, he says.

Book review: Code Quality: The Open Source Perspective

Filed under
Reviews

Code Quality: The Open Source Perspective is aimed at the very heart and soul of the open source movement. Without code quality Open Source would be a muddied named that no one would value or deploy. This book by Diomidis Spinellis is a well written, well focused and to a high degree an eternal description of the varying types and issues that can be found in programming languages such as Java and C.

n/a
n/a
n/a

VMware Slams XenSource-Microsoft Deal

Filed under
Software

VMware has slammed Microsoft's tie-up with open source virtualization developer XenSource, announced earlier this week, calling it a "one-way street," and accusing XenSource of betraying its open source roots.

Linux Patch Management: Keeping Linux Systems Up to Date

Filed under
Reviews

Michael Jang has written a new book in Bruce Perens' Open Source Series tackling the often sticky subject of Linux patch management. Targeted squarely at the busy network admin who needs to get up to speed on Linux, it promises to cover system updating and package repository set-up from the ground up. Not only that, but to do so for a variety of distributions. Let's see how it does!

Microsoft Landed On Us

Filed under
Linux

Yesterday, after I finished building a custom desktop PC and had it working beautifully with Ubuntu Linux, I decided to do some sums on how much more the system would have cost me if I used Windows software instead.

Linspire Five-O Linux OS Gives System Builders Low-End PC Option

Filed under
Reviews

Linspire aims to take over the low-end desktop with its Linspire Five-0 Linux operating system.

What the Linux World REALLY Needs...

Filed under
Linux

It has been quite a while now since the first release of Linux. In this time, there have been small pockets where Linux has grabbed a foothold and "stolen" some market share, but for the most part it is still not setting any adoption records. Why is this?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Phoronix on Graphics

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers