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Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Wolvix 1.1.0 Mini-Review & Screenshots

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Wolvix is a Linux distribution released as an installable liveCD. Originally based on Slax, it is now built upon Slackware and seems to concentrate highly on multimedia. It features XFCE4 and Fluxbox and comes with a large suite of software. Version 1.1.0 was released a few days ago and I decided to give it a little spin this weekend.

Lenovo or No, Linux Not There Yet

Filed under
Linux

Red Herring: With Monday’s news that it will bundle Linux on laptops, Lenovo becomes the second major PC maker to offer the open-source operating system on consumer PCs. But though the move is a boost for the OS, analysts say it’ll be years before desktop Linux can seriously threaten proprietary systems like Windows.

First test version of klik2 available

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: A first test version of klik2 is available. The new version features among other things fuse support.

Dancing with Wolves, a Wolvix Hunter 1.1.0 Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

on-disk.com: When Kenneth (aka Wolven) submitted Wolvix Hunter and Cub 1.1.0 to us here at On-Disk.com it was nice to see he had a new release, but I had not expected more than some updates to the existing model. Then, as I did the normal double checking that is done when we prepare to post a new release, I found that this was a serious jump from previous releases based on Slax.

Granny Uses PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

In this newest "letter" from Granny, she shares how easy installing and using Linux really can be. She also has many grateful words to share with the team at KDE and PCLinuxOS... Complete article

Free Software Magazine Issue 19

Filed under
OSS

Issue 19 of Free Software Magazine is out, and so are another 18 fantastic articles. Tony Mobily opens the magazine with his editorial on file formats. Andrew Min and Gary Richmond join forces to provide useful tips&tricks, while Robin Monks reviews some of the best free software media players.

Compositing Goodness

Filed under
SUSE

Far from Perfect: As some of you know, I gave up on MS Windows a long time ago. I have a small partition with Vista on it, but I run openSuse Linux more than 90% of the time. I have also moved into the realm of Composited Desktops. I had been running Beryl, but it merged back into Compiz earlier into the year and became Compiz Fusion. A few nights ago openSuse finally released some packages of Compiz Fusion as Compiz 0.5.2 was released.

Set up user accounts quickly and securely

Filed under
HowTos

Vincent Danen: When you need to set up a user account to give a user shell access to the system, the only logical choice of login tool is OpenSSH. With SSH keys, all you need from the user is his SSH public key, and all he needs from you is the IP address or hostname with which to log in. Usually, this is sufficient. In some cases, the user may need to know what his own password is.

Review: Linux Mint 3.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: Linux Mint, a derivative of Ubuntu which ultimately is a derivative of Debian, is a distribution that seeks to take what Ubuntu did wrong, and do it right. Their goal is to provide the most complete, out of the box experience a user can have in a linux distribution. Is it all talk and no mint, or is it really a distribution you can sink your teeth into? Well, let’s dive in and find out.

KDE Commit-Digest for 5th August 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Work in Plasma, with extra sources for the Weather data engine, work on the applet browser, and the start of SystemTray and RSIBreak plasmoids and a "next generation" application launcher, named Lancelot. Cut-down versions of Korundum and Smoke libraries for writing scripted Plasma applets. More interface work for Amarok 2.

PCFluxboxOS - Progress Report

Filed under
PCLOS

mypclinuxos.com: For anybody that doesn’t know, PCFluxboxOS is a remaster spin-off series of PCLinuxOS using the Fluxbox window manager to deliver a light and fast desktop experience.

Fedora 7 does Creative Commons

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: REDHAT-SPONSORED open source project Fedora 7 will be the platform for the Creative Commons LiveContent CD, which showcases open source software.

HP Offers Open-Source Code

Filed under
OSS

pcworld: Hewlett-Packard is releasing to the open source community the computer code for a software programming interface that helps manage large data sets in high performance computing environments.

Lenovo to sell laptops with SUSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Reuters: Lenovo Group Ltd., the world's No. 3 PC maker, said on Monday it would start selling laptop computers preloaded with Linux software from Novell Inc. instead of Microsoft Corp.'s Windows operating system.

Shuttleworth: Microsoft Fracturing the Open-Source Community

Filed under
Microsoft

eWeek: Microsoft has succeeded in fracturing the Linux and open-source community with the patent indemnity agreements it has entered into with several prominent vendors, Ubuntu leader and Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth told eWEEK.

The first KDE 4.0 beta hits the streets

Filed under
KDE

arstechnica: KDE 4.0 is very exciting, though not yet production ready, and that shows with this weeks' release of the first beta. It's a beta release for a major software project and thus, it comes complete with bugs, crashes, missing artwork, and other goodies one would expect such as new code, new technologies and fun toys.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 214

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: GParted LiveCD vs Parted Magic

  • Statistics: DistroWatch in Latin America and the Caribbean
  • News: MEPIS returns to Debian roots, Ubuntu dismisses Automatix, Carmony leaves Linspire, Medison Celebrity offers low-cost notebook with Fedora, Murdock explains future of Solaris
  • Released last week: Arch Linux 2007.08, Puppy Linux 2.17.1
  • Upcoming releases: Asianux 3.0, Foresight Linux 2.0
  • Donations: FreeNAS receives US$350
  • New additions: Webconverger
  • New distributions: CPX mini, FreevoLive, JUXlala, Klikit-Linux, OSWA-Assistant
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

BLACK HAT - Mozilla says it can patch flaws in 10 days

Filed under
Moz/FF

LinuxWorld: A Mozilla Corp. executive has vowed that his company can patch any critical vulnerability in its software within 10 days, a sign that Mozilla may intend to step up its efforts to improve security.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

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