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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 35 Is Ready For Release, Available For Download Now Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 10:50am
Story Linux, Distros, and Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 10:27am
Story Which Android smart watch is right for you? Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 10:18am
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Rebecca review - Oops. Nope. Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 10:09am
Story Use of Linux system architecture to reinvent glass container pressure testing and volume measurement Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 10:05am
Story Announcing the Mozilla Science Lab Fellowship Program Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 8:59am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 12:12am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 12:11am
Story Wine 1.7.34 Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 12:10am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2015 - 12:10am

Banshee 1.4.1 Review

Filed under
Linux
Software
Reviews

Another crappy review of Banshee? I don't think so!

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 278

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: DistroWatch Weekly - end of an era

  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 3.5.1, Ultimate Edition 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 1, Fedora 11 release schedule
  • New additions: ExTIX
  • New distributions: CAINE, Canaima, Progex, RsLive, Suriyan Linux, VortexBox, WeakNet Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

8 Great Alternative Desktop Managers For Linux

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Most of the Linux users should be familiar with Gnome and KDE since both of them are the most commonly used desktop managers in the various Linux distros. Now, if you are using an old PC with low hardware specs, you might find that the above two desktop environments are too heavy for your computer to handle.

Attack Of The Ubuntu Forks

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxhaxor.net: Every time there is a new Linux distro that is making a lot of noise in the Linux community, it is just waiting to be forked by someone. Today, we will look at some of the well-received Ubuntu based forks out there, which are not supported by Canonical.

The wit and wisdom of Linus Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Linus Torvalds is known, rightly so, as the creator of the Linux kernel. What began as his own hobby project now powers major data centres, enabled the netbook market to exist, and has given rise to many a user group install-fest. It's no wonder his opinion is canvassed regularly but the answer may not always be what you expect. Here are some of the best and most defining.

Enrich your Joomla! site with image extensions

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Several extensions can help you work with photographic images on your Joomla! content management system. Here are some of the best.

Dell’s Linux Ads: Microsoft’s Nightmare Before Christmas?

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: For at least the third time in recent weeks, prominent Dell newspaper advertisements feature the Inspiron Mini 9 Netbook running Canonical’s Ubuntu 8.04 (that’s a small Linux notebook, folks)

GTKRawGallery, a Python Based RAW Developper and Organizer

Filed under
Software

jcornuz.wordpress: Just after packing my photo computer for overseas travel, I received an email from Daniele Isca the man behind GTKRawGallery. I had been waiting for that email for months.

The extremely vocal desktop Linux tinority

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Neither Ubuntu nor any other brand of Linux is ever going to make it as a mainstream desktop operating system. Listen to a roar of protests from some of the millions of Linux desktop users around the world. Very loud they are but in the scheme of things their numbers are tiny - they are a tinority.

Mint 6 RC1 on the Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux

on-being-open.blogspot: Mint 6 is built off the solid basis of Ubuntu 8.10, and inherits most of its goodness, and layers on the extras that make Mint my favorite Distro right now.

Unjustifiable Criticism of Richard Stallman by Linus Torvalds

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: A recent attack piece against Richard Stallman was written by Linus Torvalds on the eve of Obama’s election. Linus begins with this: So I’m pretty well-known for not exactly being a huge fan of the FSF and Richard Stallman, despite the fact that I obviously love the GPLv2 and use it as the license for all my projects that I care about.

Discovering Ubuntu as a Windows User

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Going through hard financial times—who isn't? As you may already know, you can use free operating systems (OSs) and software applications, provided by the Linux open source community.

Ratpoison is very tasty stuff

Filed under
Software

it.toolbox.com: With computer interfaces getting more and more orientated towards fancy graphics and mouse orientated tasks more of your computing power is going towards eye candy than ever before. Sometimes you just don't need that sort of speed sapping click here, click there interfaces.

Linux, Windows and Mac - The OS Race

Filed under
OS

brajeshwar.com: If you belong to the “Linux Community” bandwagon, you may just have a different opinion on the fact that there are lessons to be learned from Windows and Mac.

Adobe answers cries for 64-bit Flash on Linux

Filed under
Software

cnet.com: Starting to answer the clamorous demand from open-source fans, Adobe Systems plans to release an alpha version of its Flash Player technology on Monday for those using 64-bit Linux software.

No longer a KDE fan

Filed under
KDE

ardchoille.nfshost: KDE used to be a very nice desktop environment for Linux. I thought it was the best desktop environment available for the Linux operating system. But lately things have gone downhill.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Weekend adventures with F10, GNOME 2.24, PackageKit...

  • Sun: Dead company walking?
  • Compiz With Radeon DRI2 Driver Almost There
  • NVIDIA VDPAU Benchmarks
  • Congrats Linux Community, You've Been Punked
  • Virtual Machine Backup and Restore: What’s Your Strategy?
  • The benefits of Linux in the law office
  • Boycott Novell Protesters Man-handled at Conference on Free Software
  • Vim and Qt Creator’s Quick Browse
  • NASA turns to open-source problem-tracking databases
  • first impressions from openSUSE

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Speed up web surfing in Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)

  • Managing multiple Ubuntu servers painlessly
  • Web Servers and Apache
  • How to remove Mono from Ubuntu 8.10
  • A Brief History of Build Systems #1: Introduction
  • How to Fix Usplash in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Bluetooth PAND (Personal Area Network) Howto For Debian Etch
  • Debian Sources.list Demystified
  • How to install Mod Security 2 Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10
  • Miss the animated Y!Messenger emoticons on Pidgin?
  • Deleting your digital past -- for good

Open source growth dims LAMP stack to symbolic status

Filed under
Software

techtarget.com: Four years ago, LAMP was the open stack of choice, especially for Web servers. Today, however, LAMP is like an illuminated sign with only the "A" still visible. While the existence of an all-open source application stack remains helpful, there are so many choices beyond the original group that the LAMP acronym has fallen into disuse.

Drupal, my blog, Views, and the grand experiment

Filed under
Drupal

marcelgagne.com: Lately I've been getting more and more unhappy with blogging under Drupal. Specifically, I'm developing a serious dislike (bordering on hate) for the blog module that ships with Drupal.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?