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Monday, 25 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The other *buntus srlinuxx 18/04/2011 - 12:03am
Story Privacy settings are coming to Zeitgeist srlinuxx 18/04/2011 - 12:01am
Story Lucas Rocha Leaving GNOME Release Team srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 11:59pm
Story Linux Mint 9 LXDE, Part 2 srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 9:21pm
Story GNU/Linux (& BSD) Logo Zoo, How Many Distros You can Name srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 9:17pm
Story 3 Linux Distros That You Might Never Want to Try srlinuxx 1 17/04/2011 - 6:26pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04: Small issues, big win srlinuxx 3 17/04/2011 - 6:14pm
Story Top Five Fedora Derivatives srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 5:21pm
Story Open-Source Web-Sites, Memories Of The Past srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 5:18pm
Story Unity vs GNOME 3 – Ubuntu 11.04 srlinuxx 17/04/2011 - 5:16pm

Primed for desktop Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

The consultants that rolled out Australia's biggest known Linux desktop project are backing themselves for more.

More patent craziness--McDonalds tries to patent the sandwich

Filed under
Misc

McDonald's wants to own the rights to how a sandwich is made. The fast-food chain has applied for a patent relating to the 'method and apparatus' used to prepare the snack.

Full Blurb.

Stallman finally comments on Novell/Microsoft patent deal

Filed under
SUSE

A transcript of the speech made by Richard Stallman at the 5th International GPLv3 Conference is now online, and includes Stallman’s first comments on the Novell/Microsoft deal.

Learn the power features of zsh

Filed under
HowTos

Vincent Danen describes some of the features of the Z shell, such as tab-completion and prompt-handling.

command-line calculations using bc

Filed under
HowTos

If like me, you do most of your work from the command-line, using vim to edit files, mutt for e-mails, cd/ls/mv/find/etc instead of a file manager, then you may get annoyed by having to fire up a GUI calculator to make (what may sometimes be) a single calculation.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 179

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • News: Future of Fedora, Ubuntu vs openSUSE, Debian "etch" update, Freespire 2.0

  • First Looks: Xandros Desktop 4.1
  • Released last week: Vine Linux 4.0, dyne:bolic 2.3
  • Upcoming releases: SabayonLinux 3.2, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0
  • New distributions: DevUbuntu, EduPuppy GioveLUG, mEDUXa
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Linux hot, standards not with China, Taiwan

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Earlier this year, members of Chinese and Taiwanese IT associations announced broad plans to work together to jointly develop and promote Linux as well as home-grown standards for certain IT components. At an IT trade show in Shanghai, IDG News Service (IDGNS) caught up with Roger Liao, deputy director of international affairs at one of Taiwan’s biggest industry groups, the Taiwan Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers' Association (TEEMA), to discuss progress on both fronts.

Cook up Web sites fast with CakePHP, Part 1

CakePHP is a stable production-ready, rapid-development aid for building Web sites in PHP. This tutorial will go through the installation process, then get down and dirty by building the online product gallery. And through it all, you'll see how much time you could have saved had you been using CakePHP all along.

UK pays lip service to open source in schools

Filed under
OSS

The UK's Open Source Consortium has joined criticism of UK government education policy towards open source software, maintaining that the British Education Communications and Technology Agency 'pays lip service' to open source while effectively excluding it from purchasing frameworks.

Ubuntu open week kicks off

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Open Week kicks off this week, welcoming everyone from all walks of life, distros, skills, opinions and curiosities to come along and get involved. Taking place on IRC, the sessions run from Monday till Saturday between 5pm and 11pm South African time with the aim of growing the Ubuntu community.

Xandros Linux conquers a hostile Sony laptop

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I have an impressive talent for buying laptop computers hostile to Linux. Right now I'm using a Sony Vaio VGN-FS840/W, with more proprietary drivers than you can shake a stick at. It's so bad that even a retail edition of Windows XP won't run on it; you need the OEM Windows (and sure enough, Sony is too cheap to include the CD), or you need to go to the Sony support site, download all of the drivers, and make your own supplement CD.

Encrypted remote backups made easy

Filed under
HowTos

This is an easy way to take backups and putting them on a remote site. I invented this script in order to put backups on a reliable remote site where I unfortunately only have a user account.

Ubuntu 6.10 "Edgy Eft" review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

While still far from perfect, Ubuntu 6.10 "Edgy Eft" is both an improvement over the so-called "long-term support" release and a decent operating system in its own right. It's in a much better place than any other free-of-charge operating system has been before now, but I don't think it'll give any commercial operating systems a run for their money.

Have we raised a generation of technology drones?

Filed under
Misc

I received an interesting note today from the school my children attend. In order to save precious dollars, last school year, I suggested that they begin using OpenOffice and only install Microsoft Office where there are licenses. The note I received today listed computer needs, and one of the needs listed as "Because Open Office is a lesser program compared to the Microsoft office programs, it would be helpful to have either tutorials or at least manuals for these programs."

Review: Fluxbuntu nBuild1 Revision2

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is without a doubt one of the fastest growing desktop Linux distributions. It is so popular that it has sprouted many derivatives. One of which is Fluxbuntu.

Closing Open-Source Gaps by Developing a Policy

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software is becoming ubiquitous, but companies need to be aware that its use must be carefully managed. Problems can arise because many open-source licenses require that users who incorporate open-source code in their software must make their code available for free (at reproduction cost), permit modifications of the software and permit redistribution without charging a fee.

Shell Scripting, oooh...its easy

Filed under
HowTos

Shell scripting is nothing but a group of commands put together and executed one after another in a sequential way. Let's start by mentioning the steps to write and execute a shell script.

Open Source Procurement Turns Out To Be A Dud

Filed under
OSS

More than twelve months after the NSW Department of Commerce announced approved suppliers of open source software and services to state government agencies, there hasn't been a single sale prompting a review to evaluate and improve the contract.

Printing in OpenOffice.org Calc, Part 2: Print selection and printer options

Filed under
HowTos

In part 1 of this entry, I discussed how to use Calc's page styles to control how spreadsheets print. However, although page styles are one of the most useful tools for the task, they are far from the only ones. How you setup pages for printing and the printer or export options are also part of the arsenal.

FreeCol 0.5.2 Released

Filed under
Gaming

Version 0.5.2 of FreeCol, a free/open-source Colonization clone, has been released.

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More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more