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Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Software as a subversive activity: The making of a Linux geek

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: I last booted Windows on my year-old laptop on October 8, according to my SETI@Home stats. I hadn't realized my conversion had been so complete, but over the course of the last few months, I found myself in Gates World less and less for fewer and fewer things. So it seems I'm now officially a Linux Geek.

Ubuntu Tweak: Useful and Easy

Filed under
Software

tuxgeek.me: A new version of Ubuntu Tweak has just been released and continues to make tweaking easier and fun for Ubuntu. Thanks to Ubuntu Tweak you don’t have to hack deep into the terminal for making many useful changes to your Ubuntu setup.

LoseThos: The Linux Killer?

Filed under
OS

linuxhaxor.net: If every new iteration of Ubuntu can be a Windows killer and every new touch screen phone is an iphone killer; why can’t an open source, 64-bit, kernel mode, 100k line of original code, and with a funky name like LoseThos, be a Linux killer?

Good (Linux) Things on the Horizon

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet: We seem to be in a particularly good period for Linux at the moment. We've recently gotten the Mandriva 2009.0 and Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex releases, and both of them seem to be very good. There will be a number of new releases coming in the next few weeks, as well:

Why Free Software is a Con-Trick

Filed under
OSS

opendotdotdot.blogspot: How does free software generally operate? It begins with a call for *help* - which means that it elicits the same deep human response as the con-trick described in the original post.

The Web's 11 worst blogs

Filed under
Web

itbusiness.ca: Love 'em or hate 'em, blogs are everywhere you look these days. From Britney to your boss's bratty nephew, it seems everyone has something to say--and no one's shy about sharing. We decided to seek out the lamest blogs lurking around the Internet.

AbiWord: How To Start Word Processing in Two Seconds Flat

Filed under
Reviews

AbiWord is a light-weight, open-source word processor that works under Linux, Mac OSX and Windows. Its layout will feel familiar to anyone who has used a word processor before, and you will find most things where you first look for them.

You know you are a Linux geek when...

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Not everybody is a Linux geek, or a geek at all for that matter. However some of us assimilated ones are so I decided to make a list to show what separates a Linux geek from the rest. This list is from my personal experience and is in no particular order.

First Ubuntu Jaunty Alpha imminent

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: Most of us have only just got our systems updated to Intrepid Ibex, but the Ubuntu development team is steaming ahead with plans for an Alpha 1 release of Jaunty Jackalope tomorrow.

Why I Choose CentOS for a Server

Filed under
Linux

linuxdistrochoices.com/blog: There are many options available for Linux distros, over 500. Most of them you can make into a server. However, if you are looking for the professional level server that, in my opinion, leads all other distros in functioning as a server then you need to investigate CentOS.

Mandriva, gimme a break, will ya?

Filed under
MDV

beranger.org: So I installed for a second time Mandriva 2009 XFCE. OK, it's not an official Mandriva product, but it's using its packages. And it's annoying.

Ubuntu at the Crossroads of System Logs and Community Feedback

Filed under
Ubuntu

ostatic.com: Jono Bacon, Ubuntu's community manager, has been hard at work nailing gelatin to the wall. He's putting a lot of thought into how he can best determine the vitality, growth, needs and wants of the Ubuntu community and how they best mesh with, and give back to, the wider Linux and open source communities.

Reiser seeks to appeal - says lawyer 'hates me'

Filed under
Reiser

sfgate.com: Hans Reiser, the computer programmer who admitted to strangling his estranged wife, is trying to appeal his conviction and sentence on the grounds of ineffective assistance from his lead attorney.

Should You Use Twice the Amount of Ram as Swap Space For Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Linux and other Unix-like operating systems use the term “swap” to describe both the act of moving memory pages between RAM and disk, and the region of a disk the pages are stored on. It is common to use a whole partition of a hard disk for swapping. However, with the 2.6 Linux kernel, swap files are just as fast as swap partitions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • New software in openSUSE build service

  • KDE harvest comes after the seed is planted
  • 'Free' may be losing its allure
  • Beyonce using Drupal
  • Prime Note Cartina UM, a New Linux Powered Netbook
  • ALSA 1.0.18a Released With Fixes, Updates
  • Novell releases GroupWise 8
  • Robertson--Still Hiding Details About Linspire's Demise
  • Do the Maths: GNU/Linux's Discovery
  • Should you deploy a Linux-only mainframe?
  • Netbook Smackdown: Compare the Six Top Netbooks
  • Open ATI R600/700 3D Graphics For Christmas?
  • NVIDIA 180.08 Beta Driver Adds In OpenGL 3.0
  • Improving Open-Source ATI Power Management
  • Linux Printing: A Curious Mix of Yuck and Excellence, part 2
  • about:mozilla - Developer News Nov 18
  • ARM support for openSUSE Buildservice and openSUSE
  • Linux on the Label
  • Convoluted Column Arithmetic Examples Using Awk On Linux
  • Video editing on Linux

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to create automated Linux/Unix backups

  • How To Run Gnome Panel Applets in XFCE
  • Who's On Your Linux Box
  • Small tip, how to recreate fluxbox menu
  • A Guide to System Backup and Restore in Ubuntu
  • SATA: /dev/hda Instead Of /dev/sda?
  • Use Dovecot for POP3/IMAP services
  • sK1 vector in on good illustrations
  • Treat your C code like scripts with C Cod

some off-topics

Filed under
Misc
  • dinosaurs+mice, HPUX+Linux, OOo+google office, aka the Innovator’s Dilemma
  • Major League Baseball to Silverlight: You're Out
  • The Myth Of Personal Freedom In The Digital World
  • RIAA win: Tennessee to police campus networks
  • Tech layoffs: The scorecard
  • Why Google Must Die

Gartner Report Exaggerates Open Source IP Concerns

Filed under
OSS

daniweb.com: In a report on enterprise open source usage released this week, Gartner research director Laurie Wurster stated in rather strong language that companies could face a big intellectual property issue because they are using the software without understanding the IP implications of the licensing language. But is she exaggerating.

The Linux ‘weakbook’ bites back

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I was pointed toward an interesting article recently that centered on a competitive battle of netbooks v. smartphones, indicating the latter will emerge victorious. However, will the smartphone really kill the netbook? Nah. Here’s why:

A few good reasons to switch to Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

omegamormegil.wordpress: Here’s a list of a few of the reasons I think you might want to take a look at Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Virtual Reality in Mixed Reality, Taskcluster Development

  • Building Bold New Worlds With Virtual Reality
    From rich text to video to podcasts, the Internet era offers an array of new ways for creators to build worlds. Here at Mozilla, we are particularly excited about virtual reality. Imagine moving beyond watching or listening to a story; imagine also feeling that story. Imagine being inside it with your entire mind and body. Now imagine sharing and entering that experience with something as simple as a web URL. That’s the potential before us.
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 3
    This week we’re heads down focusing on adding features in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.
  • New to me: the Taskcluster team
    At this time last year, I had just moved on from Release Engineering to start managing the Sheriffs and the Developer Workflow teams. Shortly after the release of Firefox Quantum, I also inherited the Taskcluster team. The next few months were *ridiculously* busy as I tried to juggle the management responsibilities of three largely disparate groups.
  • Taskcluster migration update: we're finished!
    Over the past few weeks we've hit a few major milestones in our project to migrate all of Firefox's CI and release automation to taskcluster. Firefox 60 and higher are now 100% on taskcluster!

OSS Leftovers

  • After the First US Transaction, Propy Announces an Open Source Developer Program
    California-based blockchain startup Propy, is bringing the commercial use of blockchain technology to the US. After facilitating the first US Blockchain-based real estate deed in Vermont, Propy announced a new open source Developer Program. The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.
  • Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source
    Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads. Titus offers a convenient model for managing compute resources, allows developers to maintain just their application artifacts, and provides a consistent developer experience from a developer’s laptop to production by leveraging Netflix container-focused engineering tools.
  • Netflix's Container Management System Is Now Open Source
    On Thursday Netflix announced it's made its home grown container management system, Titus, open source.
  • Lumina Networks on delivering open source SDN
    What kinds of companies should consider open source SDN, and what are the associated challenges in using such open source deployments? Lumina Networks has unrivalled expertise in working with customers and partners to deliver implementations, and explains its processes and outlines the benefits of using open source SDN.
  • Luxoft launches PELUX 1.0 open source platform for automotive
    Luxoft’s automotive division has launched PELUX 1.0, an open source platform available to developers. This has been developed from its PELUX software suite as used by carmakers and tier 1 suppliers to build converged infotainment, autonomous driving, communication, HMI and car body control systems.
  • Dev Preview: MongoDB Enterprise Running on OpenShift
    In order to compete and get products to market rapidly, enterprises today leverage cloud-ready and cloud-enabled technologies. Platforms as a Service (or PaaS) provide out-of-the-box capabilities which enable application developers to focus on their business logic and users instead of infrastructure and interoperability. This key ability separates successful projects from those which drown themselves in tangential work which never stops. In this blog post, we’ll cover MongoDB’s general PaaS and cloud enablement strategy as well as touch upon some new features of Red Hat’s OpenShift which enable you to run production-ready MongoDB clusters. We’re also excited to announce the developer preview of MongoDB Enterprise Server running on OpenShift. This preview allows you to test out how your applications will interact with MongoDB running on OpenShift.
  • Is Open Source The AI Nirvana for Intel? [Ed: openwashing a malicious company using buzzwords and urban myths]
  • Writing Chuck – Joke As A Service
    Recently I really got interested to learn Go, and to be honest I found it to be a beautiful language. I personally feel that it has that performance boost factor from a static language background and easy prototype and get things done philosophy from dynamic language background. The real inspiration to learn Go was these amazing number of tools written and the ease with which these tools perform although they seem to be quite heavy. One of the good examples is Docker. So I thought I would write some utility for fun, I have been using fortune, this is a Linux utility which gives random quotes from a database. I thought let me write something similar but let me do something with jokes, keeping this mind I was actually searching for what can I do and I landed up on jokes about Chuck Norris or as we say it facts about him. I landed up on chucknorris.io they have an API which can return different jokes about Chuck, and there it was my opportunity to put something up and I chose Go for it.

today's howtos

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning