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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Gates & Seinfeld’s next commercial: Better. With funny parts.

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: The second Microsoft commercial featuring Bill Gates and Jerry Seinfeld is out (being broadcast tonight during Big Brother on CBS) and at least this time, there were some funny scenes. And there was clearly a message this time.

SMPlayer: A high quality wrapper

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Loosely speaking, in software terms, a wrapper is something that provides an alternate interface to another object. SMPlayer is an advanced multimedia player wrapped around MPlayer that provides a friendlier and more powerful front end to the underlying application.

How Do Open Source Installations Compare by Operating System?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: In the previous newsletter we looked at the breakdown of Linux Distributions. Many people have since asked us how open source software compares across different operating systems like Linux, Windows, and Mac, so we decided to take a look at the average number of open source packages found by operating system.

Polk Community College, USF get $812,000 grant to develop Linux curriculum

Filed under
Linux

bizjournals.com: Polk Community College and the University of South Florida Polytechnic have received an $812,726 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a four-year curriculum for Linux computer system administration. The grant funds will be issued to the two institutions over three years.

The end of physical reboots with Linux

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: I was having an interesting conversation with my BSD buddies on whether Ubuntu is suitable/not for servers and I did my usual bragging about the servers not needing to be rebooted. I was then asked about kernel updates.

Viral ethics for Linux users

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: A little while ago I found a very intelligent, well presented argument discussing the responsibility of Linux users to install antivirus software. I’m talking about Linux machines acting as carriers.

Mozilla's Proposed 2010 Goals

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler.com: What can Mozilla do with our products and our product development processes to move the Internet toward our vision of an open, decentralized, participatory place in the next two years? In my last post I suggested we develop a set of goals to answer this question. Here’s my proposal.

GNU: the revolution turns 25

Filed under
OSS

itwire.com: It's probably a sign of the times we live in that the release of a browser by a commercial organisation like Google merits significantly more coverage than the approaching 25th anniversary of the organisation that gave rise to the free and open source software movement.

Also: The Real Reason to Celebrate GNU's Birthday

Red Flag Linux Olympic Edition fails to medal

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Red Flag is China's biggest Linux supplier. The Red Flag Linux distribution is based on Red Hat Linux. Red Flag recently announced the release of a beta edition of Red Flag Linux 7, called "Olympic Edition." While it contains the expected bugs of a beta system, it also gives us an opportunity to preview the next release of Red Flag. What I saw didn't blow me away.

Lenovo Launching Linux Netbook

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: In an email to The VAR Guy, Lenovo Senior VP J. Scott Di Valerio describes the PC giant’s evolving Linux strategy, including plans for so-called NetBooks that will launch in September and October. Here’s a look at what Di Valerio had to say.

Also: Lies, Damn Lies, and Retail Linux

Software Freedom Day in Boston

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org: The Free Software Foundation is hosting a Boston event to honor Software Freedom Day, an international holiday that was observed on every continent but Antarctica last year. The FSF will be one of more than 200 teams hosting events around the world.

Also: Software Freedom Day is Coming

Ubuntu to work more with larger Linux community

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.computerworld: Those who hate Ubuntu tend to fall into two groups. The other group are those, usually Debian Linux users, who think Ubuntu, which is based on Debian, has 'stolen' their work and that its developers haven't contributed enough back to Debian or the other open-source communities that create Linux-related software. That's about to change.

Also: Shuttleworth: Open-source desktops need a facelift

openSUSE 11.0 Survey Results

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The openSUSE survey results are out now. The survey we made in July/August time frame attracted over 12,000 participants. Here is a short summary on changes compared to the last one we did approximately 1 1/2 year ago with the openSUSE 10.2 release.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Split and merge large files

  • Run Windows Apps 100% Seamlessly on Ubuntu
  • Howto solve all PulseAudio-related issues in Ubuntu
  • How to create an ubuntu 8.04.1 boot floppy
  • Evaluating Number Grids Using Perl
  • How To Fix Wrong Timestamps On Gmail Messages
  • 10 tips for lazy sysadmins
  • Force Users To Change Their Passwords Upon First Login

Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.

Filed under
Just talk

Reasons to not even bother trying Linux, ever : ( cue drum roll... )

Installing memcached And The PHP5 memcache Module On Debian Etch (Apache2)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how to install memcached and the PHP5 memcache module on a Debian Etch system with Apache2. memcached is a daemon that can store objects in the system's memory (e.g. results of database queries) which can speed up your web site tremendously.

What UUIDs can do for you

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you've ever looked in your /etc/fstab file, you have may have seen an entry that looks like UUID=62fa5eac-3df4-448d-a576-916dd5b432f2 instead of a more familiar disk drive designation, such as /dev/hda1. Such entries are called universally unique identifiers (UUID). You can use these 128-bit numbers to make hard disk management easier.

10 interesting open source software forks and why they happened

Filed under
Software

royal.pingdom.com: A benefit of open source software is the ability to take the code base of an application and develop it in a new direction. This is, as most of you probably know, called forking, and is very common in the open source community. For example, many Linux distributions can be traced back to either Debian, Fedora or Slackware.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Review

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

tabletpcreview.com: Dell offers the Mini 9 with either Windows XP or a customized Ubuntu Linux operating system. Our pre-production unit came equipped with Ubuntu, and the Dell-developed custom interface is point-and-click easy and acts similar to Windows ... only easier (if you don't try to install new applications).

KDE Congratulates CERN's Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

dot.kde.org: Today was Big Bang Day at CERN as the world's largest science experiment was turned on. Like all good technology enthusiasts the KDE developers have been keeping up with the progress of the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.