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Wednesday, 07 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Microsoft reignites its war on Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

Linux-Watch: "Even the founder of the Free Software Foundation, Richard Stallman, noted last year that Linux infringes well over 200 patents from multiple companies The real question is not whether there exist substantial patent infringement issues, but what to do about them."

Going political and Linux the Ubuntu way

Filed under
Ubuntu

Life of Riley: I've posted here before some announcements about the fact that Venezuela was shifting to Linux as their preferred operating system in sync with Cuba who has made a major re-commitment to Linux in an .attempt to grow its open source community and steer further away from tech dependencies on imperialism.

Also: Ubuntu, Craft, and iTunes

Enhancing eBay with Firefox extensions

Filed under
Moz/FF

Linux.com: eBay is a great way to acquire hard-to-find collectibles. Trouble is, the best deals are often found in auctions that end in the middle of the night. When that happens, the Biet-O-Zilla (BOZ) extension for Firefox can help you, by tracking auctions and scheduling bids in advance.

Edubuntu update - still rocking

Filed under
Ubuntu

ZDNet: So all 4 of my kids spent the weekend on and off the computers in the basement. They played games, looked up cheat codes for their console games, sent emails, and wrote a research paper on Langston Hughes.

One Laptop per Child official criticizes WiMAX community

Filed under
OLPC

EETimes: An official at the One Laptop per Child project criticized the WiMAX community on Monday for mainly focusing on equipment in the licensed bands, which will stymie innovation and stall a rapid decline in equipment prices.

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 7 - Regional and Accessibility

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: Welcome to part 7 of our series on the KDE 3.5 Control Center. Today we'll be covering the "Regional and Accessibility" section. This section serves two basic purposes that are useful for everyone using KDE on a regular basis.

Distro Selectors: How Accurate Are They?

Filed under
Reviews

OSWeekly: Nearly everyday, I have people e-mailing me with questions regarding my choice of the distributions that I highlight. But then it struck me: how are beginners or even those experienced users really supposed to be expected to make time to discover that next big Linux distribution love affair?

Ten things a Linux Fanboy will not tell you: when you install linux

Filed under
Linux

Tryst with Linux: Yes, I read the list here. And as most lists are, it included somethings it shouldn’t have, and missed somethings it shouldn’t have. So, anyway, here’s my list (and perhaps my exaggerated confessional!) based/built on the earlier list.

A brief introduction to mutt-ng

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: mutt is a well known and much loved mail client well suited to the efficient handling of a large volume of email. One of the things which makes it so powerful is its extreme flexibility and customisation options. The next-generation mutt package builds upon the core mutt with some additional features; most noticeably the introduction of a sidebar, which this article introduces.

How To Back Up MySQL Databases Without Interrupting MySQL

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HowTos

This article describes how you can back up MySQL databases without interrupting the MySQL service. Normally, when you want to create a MySQL backup, you either have to stop MySQL or issue a read lock on your MySQL tables in order to get a correct backup; if you do not do it this way, you can end up with an inconsistent backup. To get consistent backups without interrupting MySQL, I use a little trick: I replicate my MySQL database to a second MySQL server, and on the second MySQL server I use a cron job that creates regular backups of the replicated database.

Create high-quality Web graphs in minutes with Plotr

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HowTos

Linux.com: Need to add professional-looking graphs to your Web site? Using Plotr, you can do this in no time and with minimum fuss.

Preview websites with Cooliris

Filed under
Software

tectonic: Do you suffer from too many pages open on your browser? Do you compulsively have to open links, just out of curiosity of what might be on the other side? If so, Cooliris Preview may just be the solution for you.

Ooh, ooh, the bogeyman is gonna getcha with his stupid patents. Or maybe not.

Filed under
Microsoft

Groklaw: I'm being buried alive in email about the Fortune article about Microsoft's patent saber rattling, which I thought so unimportant I put it in News Picks earlier. Here's why I'm not unduly worried so far.

Open Source: Can software truly ever be 'free'?

Filed under
OSS

mywesttexas: There is a revolution going on. Since the dawn of the Computer Age, software developers have met in small groups to discuss the unthinkable, Free Software. In these times, even a kindergartner knows that there's no such thing as a free lunch... or is there?

Does Tux500 violate the Linux trademark?

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Pete: One difference between corporate sponsorship and a... uh... crew of private individuals is that corporations have the forethought to establish that they have the legal blessings of the brand they intend to market before marketing it.

Questions Answered, Questions Posed - What Happened to Tux500?

Filed under
Linux

Blog of Helios: One hundred and seven emails were actionable questions or comments concerning the Tux500 project. Those questions or comments were broken down into catagory and because they address important matters in the community, I have decided that some of them need answered sooner than I can physically get to them individually. Herein, I will address them by catagory.

What is the difference between Shell Commands and Linux Commands?

Filed under
HowTos

About.com: The Linux / Unix operating systems come with many commands that the user can enter into the computer from the keyboard and use to interact with the computer. There are two kinds of commands that come with a Linux / Unix operating system: Shell Commands and Linux/Unix Commands. Here is a comparison of the two:

Using netselect-apt - Tip to select the fastest Debian mirror

Filed under
HowTos

All about Linux: Each time I install Debian - and I have done it scores of times on multiple machines, I get frustrated in choosing the right Debian mirror for updating the package database on my machine using 'apt-get update', or installing a new package for that matter.

How to install Ubuntu Studio in Windows using VirtualBox - a complete walkthrough

Filed under
HowTos

Simplehelp: This tutorial will take you every single step of the way through installing Ubuntu Studio using VirtualBox for Windows. In other words, even your parents should be able to follow along.

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More in Tux Machines

Office Suites

  • Microsoft Office, Google Docs beware: This open-source startup is after your users
    "That was one of the reasons why we chose an open-source model. We want be open, want people to trust us, want to overcome that barrier they have in mind, those strong beliefs that there's nothing but Microsoft Office, that nothing better could be created. We won't change our mind about open source." Bannov says he ultimately sees OnlyOffice becoming a firm that provides consulting, technical support and remote managed services to companies using its open-source products.
  • Collabora Online 2.0 Puts LibreOffice In the Cloud, Adds Collaborative Editing
    Today, December 7, 2016, Collabora Productivity, through Michael Meeks, is proud to inform Softpedia about the general availability of the long anticipated Collabora Online 2.0 office suite based on the LibreOffice, Nextcloud, and ownCloud technologies. After being in development for the past six months, Collabora Online 2.0 is finally here as the powerful cloud-based office suite that promises to protect users' privacy and freedom of expression while editing various documents formats online. Collabora Online is mainly targeted at the enterprise world, hosting and cloud businesses.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Why Is Microsoft Showing So Much Interest In Linux? [Ed: Someone needs to explain to Mathew Lodge what EEE is and how it works. Is the Linux Foundation (including Rorvalds as well) still permitted to criticise Microsoft or is it frowned upon internally?]
  • Linux on the Mac — state of the union
    The MacBook Pro introduction in October caused unusually negative reactions among professional users due to the realization that Apple no longer caters equally to casual and professional customers as it had in the past [YouTube video]. Instead, the company appears to be following an iOS-focused, margin-driven strategy that essentially relegates professionals to a fringe group. This has well-known developers such as Salvatore Sanfilippo (of the Redis project) consider a move back to Linux. Perhaps that's a good moment to look at the current state of Mac hardware support in the kernel. While Macs are x86 systems, they possess various custom chips and undocumented quirks that the community needs to painstakingly reverse-engineer.
  • How well does the Linux kernel support Mac hardware?
    There is an interesting subset of Linux users that prefer to run it on a Mac. Yes, a Mac. That might seem odd given how Apple is known for its closed ecosystems and high cost hardware, but the Linux on Mac folks really do exist out there. But how well does the Linux kernel support Mac hardware? LWN.net has a “state of the union” article for Linux on the Mac that could be quite helpful if you are thinking about installing Linux on your Mac.
  • New Kernel Vulnerability Allows Local Root For Unprivileged Processes
    There is yet another new Linux kernel vulnerability being disclosed today that allows for unprivileged processes to gain kernel code execution abilities. This new vulnerability is CVE-2016-8655 but it doesn't seem to be getting too much attention yet. CVE-2016-8655 comes down to a race condition within the af_packet.c code for gaining local root access. The researcher that found it was able to write an exploit to gain root shell on an Ubuntu 16.04 LTS system and defeats SMEP/SMAP protection too.
  • Avoiding CVE-2016-8655 with systemd
    Just a quick note: on recent versions of systemd it is relatively easy to block the vulnerability described in CVE-2016-8655 for individual services. Since systemd release v211 there's an option RestrictAddressFamilies= for service unit files which takes away the right to create sockets of specific address families for processes of the service. In your unit file, add RestrictAddressFamilies=~AF_PACKET to the [Service] section to make AF_PACKET unavailable to it (i.e. a blacklist), which is sufficient to close the attack path. Safer of course is a whitelist of address families whch you can define by dropping the ~ character from the assignment. Here's a trivial example:
  • The Best Features Of The Linux 4.9 Kernel

today's howtos