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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Oracle, Extreme Join OpenDaylight SDN Group Roy Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 8:14am
Story AMD boosts G-Series SoC performance-per-watt, adds security engine Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:54am
Story Calligra-powered Okular plugin for ODT, DOC & DOCX Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:46am
Story Unboxing the Intel NUC at Tizen Developer Conference 2014 #TDCSF14 Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:34am
Story Ubuntu MATE Flavor Could Arrive Soon, Prototype Looks Great Already Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:20am
Story A GTKINSPECTOR UPDATE Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:14am
Story Sound Support Gets Updated For The Next Kernel Release Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:05am
Story Kali, Makulu, and Robo Linuxes Rianne Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 7:01am
Story Linux-based NAS hosts private clouds and VMs Roy Schestowitz 06/06/2014 - 2:26am
Story This Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 9:49pm

Is Ubuntu becoming the generic Linux distro?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet: Has anyone else noticed an increasing number of Linux newbies who seem to think that Ubuntu is Linux and Linux is Ubuntu? I’m of the opinion that the evolution of Ubuntu into the generic Linux distro isn’t a bad thing.

Also: First Impressions: Ubuntu 8.04 Beta

OpenOffice may support OOXML

Filed under
OOo

news.zdnet.co.uk: OpenOffice may support Microsoft's Office Open XML standard in future, but the organisation behind the open source productivity suite anticipates that everyone including Microsoft will have "difficulty" in making the format work.

Also: Microsoft's ISO win may worsen its antitrust woes

Firefox Extension for Amazon EC2 - an EC2 for the rest of us?

Filed under
Moz/FF

raiden.net: About a year ago I looked into AWS (amazon Web Services) and EC2 (Elastic Computing Cloud), at the time I was not overly impressed simply because of the complexity of the setup that the user was expected to endure just to get it running. It wasn't until recently that I needed to re evaluate the service again for a project when I came across this beautiful utility. With this extension I hereby give EC2 to the rest of us.

Phoronix Test Suite Released

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Back in early February we announced that we were in the process of formalizing and releasing our internal test tools as a platform for facilitating easy to use, accurate, and reproducible Linux benchmarks based upon the testing work that we have been doing at Phoronix for the past four years.

Linux Gazette April 2008 (#149) Issue Ready

Filed under
Linux

The April 2008 issue of Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Some topics include: Deividson on Databases, VPN Networking, and Fun with Instant Messaging and Ruby.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 16

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue 16 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: People of openSUSE: Marco Michna, openSUSE Board election proposal, and openSUSE IRC - call for participation.

Damn Minuscule Linux: SliTaz 1.0

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: 25MB... surely this is a mistake? A Linux distribution which includes Firefox, an audio player, a CD ripper/encoder, email, FTP client and lots more... with a 25MB ISO footprint? Someone’s having a laugh, aren’t they? Er, actually, no.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OOo Basic crash course: Creating a simple game using strings in a database

  • Integrating XCache Into PHP5 (Debian Etch & Apache2)
  • HowTo: Identify your IPv4/IPv6 Loopback Address
  • How To Configure Automatic Updates Schedule In Ubuntu

Donate for the Libre Graphics Meeting

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: The 3rd annual Libre Graphics Meeting will be held in Wrocław, Poland May 8 - 11. We are trying to raise USD$ 20,000 in the next 16 days before Friday, April 18th in order to support the conference and to help developers with travel and accommodation costs.

ISO: Office Open XML ratified as standard

Filed under
OSS

news.com: As expected, the ISO on Wednesday announced that Office Open XML (OOXML) has been approved as a standard, marking the end a long and sometimes contentious path.

Also: * OOXML approval only first step in road to adoption
* ODF Alliance Statement on the ISO Vote on OOXML
* ISO/IEC DIS 29500 receives necessary votes for approval as an International Standard

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Study: April Fool's Day 37% Less Fooling

  • Mercurial - my 2 cents
  • Who wrote Linux update
  • Ubuntu’s Shuttleworth blames ISO for OOXML’s win
  • Get answers to all your Linux questions direct from the source
  • 10 Great Linux Commercials
  • Linux and FOSS - Are You An Advocate or a Zealot?
  • Mozilla Developer News April 1
  • Brasero 0.7.x, the trivial speed bug
  • PCLinuxOS, April 2008 and The Clash of Leading Linux Titans
  • Linux: Too Much of a Good Thing?
  • Reiser How-To Wiki: Sleep in a Tiny Car, Convert Hatchback to Bed

PCLinuxOS Magazine April 2008 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS Magazine, April 2008 (Issue 20) is available to download. Some highlights include: PCLinuxOS...On a Stick, Smart Package Manager and PCLinuxOS, and PCLinuxOS Based Distros.

Extensions for OpenOffice.org Impress

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: Extensions have long been written for OpenOffice.org Writer. However, the fact that attention is finally being paid to other applications seems a sign that OpenOffice.org is finally starting to develop an active extension-writing community. A case in point is the recent availability of extensions for Impress.

more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fancy a XP on Your Ubuntu? (XPde)

  • Quickzi: How To Set Cron to Run Every 5 Minutes
  • Nautilus Tip: Quickly Open Special Locations
  • Recording Skype calls in Linux
  • Using Bash To Access The Network Via File Descriptors

What Happens When You Call Microsoft Support To Remove Linux?

Filed under
Microsoft

fsckin.com: For this April Fools’ day, I’ll call Microsoft to help me uninstall Linux. Yes, that’s right. Microsoft would willingly help me uninstall Linux, they even have a Knowledgebase article on it, and all I would need to do is tell them I’m having some problems following the KB article, and they would helpfully guide me through it.

Kernel space: ELF prediction to speed application startup

Filed under
Linux

computerworld: A new technique might make it faster to get started with a large application, by giving the kernel advance notice of what are most likely to be the program's commonly used memory pages.

SliTaz 1.0 on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I’ve been getting a lot of links back to an offhand post I made about three months ago about SliTaz, but I realize now I never really “reviewed” that distro, if you can call these random notes “reviews.”

Wall Street still likes Linux, but for new reasons

Filed under
Linux

betanews.com: Of all of the industies deploying Linux and open source software, financial services have been among the earliest adopters. But what do banks and brokerages see in these emerging alternatives besides possibly lower up-front costs?

Hans Reiser Explaining 'Construction Project' and Nina's Blood

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Hans Reiser took the witness stand for the eighth day at his murder trial here Monday and offered innocent explanations over why his wife's blood was discovered at his house, the last place where she was seen alive.

Gentoo 2008.0 Beta LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Gentoo

phoronix.com: Gentoo 2008.0 Beta 1 has been released. This is no April Fools' Day joke, it's really here. We have some screenshots up of the Gentoo 2008.0 Beta 1 i686 LiveCD.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.