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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 28/10/2011 - 5:26am
Story Q&A with Enlightenment Lead Developer "Rasterman" srlinuxx 1 28/10/2011 - 2:22am
Story Linuxcon: BMW might use Linux in future cars srlinuxx 28/10/2011 - 2:06am
Story OMG! Ubuntu!: The Interview! srlinuxx 28/10/2011 - 2:04am
Story The First Development Release For GNOME 3.4 srlinuxx 28/10/2011 - 2:01am
Story 4 Tools To Make Use Of That May Improve Your Writing srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 10:58pm
Story Is Open Source Innovative? srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 10:56pm
Story Sabayon Definitely Has a Personality All Its Own srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 10:39pm
Story Ubuntu in Retail Stores in China srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 8:08pm
Story Multi Boot vs Virtual Machine srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 8:04pm

Dell and the Linux Desktop

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There’s quite a bit of speculation going on at what distribution of Linux Dell will choose to put onto its desktops or if they’ll even attempt to put Linux on the desktop.

Use key-based authentication with SSH

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It’s really simple to login with your username/password combination on the remote machine, but sometimes it can be a better idea to use key-based authentication.

Key-based authentication is where instead of authenticating that you are you with the remote machine credentials, you use a cryptographic key pair.

Prevent Firefox from overwriting your tabs

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By default when you click the Open All in Tabs option in a bookmarks folder or a live bookmark, the bookmarks are opened in different tabs replacing the current tab set you have at that time.

monitor custom programs with ps and watch

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ps is a very useful tool to list all current running processes with various info such as CPU usage, memory usage, process status, process id etc.

watch is another good tool to continuously execute some programs in infinite loop. watch allows you to make use of commands such as ps, netstat, lsof into monitoring purpose.

How to Fix broken Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

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Ubuntu Development team released ubuntu feisty fawn beta on 23rd March 2007 some of them started upgrading their edgy to feisty .If your feisty broken here is the procedure to fix that.

Boot up with a live cd, or ubuntu CD from a different partition.

Mount your feisty drive somewhere in this example i am mounting on /media/feisty

Create a directiory when do you want to mount

Who speaks for Microsoft on open source?

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Does Steve Ballmer speak for Microsoft on open source? He's the CEO, and he seems to think that open source does not exist, has no right to exist, and can be ground down with lawyers.

Or how about Brad Abrams? Is it Jason Matusow? Should we look to the Microsoft legal team, its executive ranks, or what about the geek standing in front of you on the trade show stand?

Building the XO: The Anatomy of an Activity

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Last time, we talked about installing Sugar so that you could emulate the OLPC environment on your system. Now it’s time to explore how activities work on the XO.

Finding your activities

Novell takes Microsoft’s InfoCard technology open source

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Novell is developing an open source implementation of Microsoft’s identity card technology that is functionally equivalent to the Windows software but will run on both Linux and Macintosh.

Novell steering Microsoft defectors back to Microsoft?

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Oh, my. On the one hand, Mary Jo is reporting that, just as Novell's Bruce Lowry had said, Novell's pact with Microsoft seems to be earning it back market share against Red Hat.

Here come the RHEL 5 clones

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If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Red Hat should be flattered. Less than two weeks after the company introduced RHEL 5 (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5), StartCom Ltd. released the first RHEL 5 clone, StartCom Enterprise Linux AS-5.0.0.

Gentoo attempts to deal with developer conflicts

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Earlier this month, Slashdot posted a piece asking whether the Gentoo project is in "crisis." The project has responded to the issues discussed in the posting, in part, by adopting a Code of Conduct (CoC), with "proctors" who will address breaches of the CoC. So far, that move seems of limited worth.

Quicker open source editor: Emacs

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The open source Emacs editor (one of the powerhouses of UNIX computing) is a large, complex application that does everything from editing text to functioning as a complete development environment.

Debian/etch Xen: Nice, but not quite ready for me

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n my previous post I explained how I set up my new server as a Xen server in order to maximize my flexibility. It's been little over a week now and I am saddened to say that Xen has gone out the Window. While I love the flexibility, it's just not ready for me yet.

Snag 1: Running NFS

Benchmarking With VDrift

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Chris Guirl sent me a note this weekend alerting me to the release of VDrift 2007-03-23 and letting me know that this drift racing game now supports benchmarking.

Linux-Optimized Laptops: Does the Hardware Matter?

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Even though interest in server-side Linux has been steadily growing in enterprises and organizations around the world, desktop and laptop-based Linux solutions have faced a steady series of uphill climbs.

Novell: It's Cheaper Than Linux

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Lately, I have watched various companies make marketing blunders on a near everyday basis. Some in the general media, others in niche arenas, where most people will never see just how huge of a mistake was actually made. But all of them aside, Novell has had the pleasure of topping them all and solidifying fears that many Linux users share, with one single statement.

Non-free repositories!?

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There’s a discussion going on on my LUG mailing list today which seems to have diverged from its original topic to the question of the inclusion of officially supported non-free repositories in distributions: is this merely facilitating freedom or does it have more sinister implications for free software?

Nero for Linux V3 is almost out

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NERO WAS SHOWING two things at CeBIT, one was a great thing, the other potentially interesting. One requires hardware, the other doesn't require Windows.

Changing the look of Wine

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One of the nicer things of Linux is that you have tons of thinkerers around. One of my online buddies who goes by the nick of Tripl showed this solution to change the default look of Wine (simply horrible) into the human theme of Ubuntu.

All the text bellow needs to be pasted bellow the line above in ~/.wine/user.reg that is your home directory .wine folder


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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.
  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells
    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it. We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42
    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday). But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • The Open Source Way
    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large. It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.
  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti
    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.
  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version
    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively. Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying. Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.
  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript
    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta. Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.
  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop
    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.
  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading
    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks. SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects. In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.
  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.